Episodio / Episode #
20
January 7, 2022

Reflecciones | Reflections

English

Español

English

Happy New Year, friends! Today, for our first episode in the New Year of 2022, I’ll be speaking to you all by myself in order to offer some brief reflections on our show.

I’ll be using the structure that you’ll be familiar with if you’re a regular listener: I’m going to reflect a little on where we’ve come from, and then pass on to consider what’s coming. It turns out to be an exercise particularly well suited to the season of the New Year. The month of January in which we find ourselves right now takes its name from the Roman god Janus, a curious figure who had two faces, one turned toward the past and one toward the future. I don’t know if Janus knew how to sing; but today I plan to make my reflections with the help of the many and diverse musics that our interviewees have brought us in the course of the last nine months.

But first, let’s begin with a little data. From our first episode, released on March 19, 2021, to today, we’ve brought 19 episodes before the public—this one makes #20 -- one every two weeks, right up to our December break. Most have been long-form interviews with people who live or work in Santa Ana, CA. And It’s worth recalling that every episode is released in two languages. We continue to be one of the very few podcasts in the world that is completely bilingual. Every interview is translated, re-recorded with an actor or actress, and re-edited, along with all the commentaries and introductory materials. A little while ago, Wes, one of our Audio engineers, commented that this means that in effect we’ve produced 40 episodes in only 35 weeks! We’re quite proud of this accomplishment.

Our interviewees, the heart and soul of the project, represent all adult age groups, from 19 to 84 years of age, and a range of occupations that includes artists, musicians, nurses, teachers, house-cleaners, students, gardeners, professionals, and more. Some are parents. And it’s notable how many are community organizers. Activism is an electric current that runs through the veins of our show, and it’s something that makes Santa Ana a very exciting place to live.

With all this, I want to point out that we’ve only managed to represent a few corners of the multi-ethnic, multi-lingual human landscape in which we’re based. Now Janus puts on his forward-looking face: we’d really like to be able to connect with the local communities that speak Asian languages, and with more members of the Black community; and I wish we could find a suitable way to connect with the many Santanerxs who presently live unhoused, scrabbling out their lives among the streets and alleyways, chased out of so-called public spaces by the police, as if homelessness were a crime.

It remains to be seen if we’ll realize these hopes. Of course we cannot be all things to all people, and “Si yo Fuera” has its planned termination at the end of June this year, when our grant funding runs out. But naming a dream can be the first step toward its realization, and the year is yet young!

________________________________________

Now, dear listeners, I want to invite you to accompany me on a lightning musical journey through the 40-some songs we’ve featured so far, touching on the most striking and relevant themes that they’ve evoked in our interviews to date.

Fasten your seatbelts, please!

I think the theme that encompasses all the others in our show, the meta-theme, is the question of our due place in this world. Every single one of will ask ourselves about this repeatedly during our lives, and every one of us is going to come to different answers on their path. This human tendency to question and to seek gets a classic expression in the song, “La maza,” or “The hammer,” by Silvio Rodríguez, which Laura Pantoja shared with us in Episode 15.

[ “La maza”]

The question of our place in the world has a particularly sharp edge for migrants and the children of migrants, a large population in Santa Ana that includes two thirds of our interviewees to date. Some of them have chosen songs that directly explore the migrant condition. Thus Jorge Drexler, in his song “Movimiento,” from Episode 6 with Lucy Dale:

[Drexler, ““Movimiento”]

So too, Ana Tijoux in “Vengo,” from Episode 12 with Marlha Sánchez.

[ “Vengo”]

The great Atahualpa Yupanqui, whose music was shared by Luis Sarmiento in Episode 4, expresses the tension between past and future that migrants know so well, as a fundamental aspect of the human condition, in his beautiful “Tú que puedes, vuélvete:” “You who can, come back.”

[Atahualpa “Tú que puedes”]

The river of nostalgia that flows through this song has become at times a very strong current in our show. Many participants have chosen songs that evoke the places they were born; and many of these places are in Mexico. Accordingly our show has at times become a nostalgic revisiting of Mexican regional musics; and it must be said that Mexicans do nostalgia like no one else!

Angélica Sánchez, in our very first episode, kicked off with  the wonderful “Canción mixteca” an archetypal example of Mexican longing for the far away.

[Canción mixteca]

Laura Pantoja, in Episode 15, evoked the nostalgia for the long ago, with her childhood memories of the music of Cri Cri:

[Cri Cri, “La patita”]

Mariachi, a musical symbol of Mexicanness recognized the world over, evokes for many a potent mix of nostalgia and national pride. Graciela and Jorge Holguín, in the double Episode 5, guided us through some memorable moments from this grand tradition of Jalisco State.

[Mariachi: Guadalajara – Chapala – La culebra]

But mariachi is only one of many musics from Jalisco. Our interviewees Diana Morales, in Episode 13, as well as Patricia Flores, in 19, evoked indigenous musics from the same area, reminding us of the P’urhépecha and Cuyuteca traditions respectively.

[Indigenous musics from Jalisco: Tarheperama - El tecolote].

Meanwhile,  in Episode 11, Yuritzy Elizabeth shows us a kind of nostalgia with a wry twist in “La tapatía,” an affectionately ironic musical recollection of the capital city of Jalisco, Guadalajara.

[ “La tapatía”]

Passing to the other side of the isthmus, the pride and struggle of indigenous youth in the coastal regions of Veracruz can be heard in the song “Marap,” shared by Luis Sarmiento in Episode 4.

[ “Marap”]

In the end, no show that tries to represent the musical lives of migrants would be complete without the famous song of Facundo Cabral, “No soy de aquí ni de allá,” “I’m not from here nor from there,” which Yax Montaño brought us in Episode 16. Yax prefers the iconic version sung by Chavela Vargas, whose inimitable voice lends another layer of ambiguity to the already ambivalent lyrics.

[Vargas, “No soy de aquí…”]

But of course, nostalgia, remembrance, and reflection make up only one face of the human condition. The other, Janus-style, faces what is to come, with courage, resolution, imagination – and sometimes rage, over lived injustice.

[ “I’m enough/I want more”]

The screams of Victoria Ruíz of The Downtown Boys erupt from her throat against the social and human outrages that capitalism inflicts on the world. It’s one of the songs that Marilynn Montaño brings to Episode 19. Its message, though not its musical style, finds an echo in “What it Means” by The Drive By Truckers in Episode 2 with Fernando Agredano, as well as “Robinn Hood Theory” by Gang Starr, from Episode 18 with Patricia Flores. Both songs openly protest USAmerican racism.

[ “What it means” & “Robinn Hood Theory”]

At the heart of any effective protest is the simple act of simply speaking truth to power. This can even be done in a friendly, even a happy tone, as the group Emma’s Revolution does in “Code Pink,” shared by Kahlo Quinn in Episode 9.

[ “Code Pink”]

Direct protest is only one way of facing the future, of course. Marching alongside resistence and protest, hand in hand with them in a manner of speaking, come imagination, dream time and even fantasy, as Alberto Cortez reminds us in Episode 10 with “Castillos en el aire,” “Castles in the Air,” shared by Abel Ruíz;

[ “Castillos en el aire”]

--and also the Nicaraguan duo Guardabarranca, introduced by Cat Quinn in Episode 3.

[“Mi Luna”]

The rich vein of fantasy, imagining alternative landscapes, worlds, and futures, is mined by all ages, as we are shown by young Yax Montaño in Episode 16 with the sonic flyover of “Flight 319,” as well as the mature Don Apolonio Cortés in Episode 14 with the evocative sonic landscape of “Blue Navajo.”

[ “Flight 319” y “Navajo Azul”]

What’s certain is that the voyage forward, whether we fly or we march, will ask a lot of us. It’s for this reason, I think, that another theme that has arisen regularly among our interviewees is the necessity of good self-care. Our playlist abounds in songs dedicated to raise confidence and sustain faith in oneself. For some reason I haven’t been able to analyze yet, this kind of musical advice is mostly offered through hip hop and R&B.

Thus we find Ana Tijoux singing “Creo en ti,” “I believe in you,” in Episode 13, shared by Diana Morales;

[Creo en Ti”]

in Episode 19, Marilynn Montaño shares “Mija,” a tender evocation of parental support by Vel the Wonder, an independent rapper;

[“Mija”]

--and in Episode 6, Lucy Dale also touches on the theme of the body as temple with the song “Holy,” by the poet and rapper Jamila Woods of Chicago.

[“Holy”]

On the R&B side, Episode 8 with Brian Peterson brought us the hyper-animated “Man in the Mirror” de Michael Jackson, while Episode 12 with Marlha Sánchez featured the more introverted “Authors of Forever,” by Alicia Keyes.

[“Authors of Forever”]

However, the will to keep going, to get ahead, and to change the world isn’t just found in inspiring lyrics, however beautifully sung. Bodily movement also inspires us, and it’s inspired in turn by a kaledioscopic range of rhythms and grooves. Dance turns out to be another important theme.

Veracruzan traditional dance is featured in Episode 7, with Teri Saydak:

[“Siquisirí”]

A little more sedate, perhaps, is the vallenato that Fernando Agredano offers us in Episode 2:

[“Los caminos de la vida”]

While the son abajeño shared by Diana Morales in Episode 13 is on the animated side:

[“Adios California”]

And dance can also evoke tender memories, as does the vals shared by Abel Ruíz in Episode 10, the classic “Sobre las Olas.”

[“Sobre las olas”]

Dance music moves us forward physically as well as spiritually, even if the words are all about the past, which is what happens in “September,” the happy classic funk song shared by Patricia Flores in Episode 18.

[“September”]

The good cheer and hopefulness that just overflow from Earth, Wind & Fire can also be found in the last group of songs I’m going to discuss here: those that deal with unity and love, the meta-theme that inspires not only many of our interviewees, but this entire project.

[ “La marseillaise”]

Unity and love march together under the flag of great inspirational phrases like those of the choruses of “All You Need is Love,” shared by Teri Saydak in Episode 7, or “We Are the World,” shared by Brian Peterson en Episode 8.

[“We Are the World fake”]

Unity can be explored through acts of radical identification with the Other – the “I am you” suggested by the great songwriter Luis Pastor in “En las fronteras del mundo,” offered by Yuritzy Elizabeth in Episodio 11.

[“En las fronteras del mundo”]

Or else it can be found at home, around the table, passing the time with beloved ones, but with the door open to whomever shows up—a scene both familiar and radical painted by The Highwomen with their country song, “Crowded Table,” shared Cat Quinn in Episode 3.

[“Crowded Table”]

For me, all these different ways of exploring and expressing unity and love are braided together and added up in the sweet but powerful song by Maren Morris that Kahlo Quinn shared with us in Episode 9, “Dear Hate.”

[“Dear Hate”]

There is one song left from our playlist that I’ve saved for the end, and that’s the one that Angélica Sánchez chose in Episode 1:

[“Gracias a la vida”]

I want to close today’s show by expressing my special thanks to my production team.

Over the past year we have gone from being a motley crew of students and new professionals, led by a musicologist in her 60s with no experience in podcasting -- through a million lessons large and small about what it means to launch and sustain a community media project -- to becoming, step by step, a small, close-knit community of our own.

That was something I didn’t see coming when I began this project, and it continues to be a joy despite all its challenges.

I am eager to see what this New Year brings us, and where we will take our show in the months to come!

Would you like to know more?

On our website at siyofuera.org, you can find complete transcripts in both languages of every interview, our Blog about the issues of history, culture, and politics that come up around every song, links for listeners who might want to pursue a theme further, and some very cool imagery. You’ll find playlists of all the songs from all the interviews to date, and our special Staff-curated playlist as well.

We invite your comments or questions! Contact us at our website or participate in the Si Yo Fuera conversation on social media. We’re out there on FaceBook and Instagram. And then there’s just plain old word of mouth. If you like our show, do please tell your friends to give it a listen. And do please subscribe, on any of the major podcast platforms. We’ll bring a new interview for you, every two weeks on Friday mornings.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, and Wesley McClintock are our sound engineers; Zoë Broussard and Laura Díaz hold down the marketing; David Castañeda is Music Researcher; Jen Orenstein translates interviews to and from Spanish; Deyaneira García and Alex Dolven make production possible. We are a not-for-profit venture, currently and gratefully funded by the John Paul Simon Guggenheim Foundation, UCLA’s Faculty Grants Program, and the Herb Alpert School of Music.

For now, and until the next interview—keep listening to one another!

I’m Elisabeth Le Guin, and this is, “Si yo fuera una canción -- If I were a song…”

Español

¡Feliz Año Nuevo, mis amigxs! Hoy, para nuestro primer episodio del nuevo año de 2022, les voy a hablar yo sola, con unas breves reflecciones sobre nuestro show.

Voy a emplear la estructura que, si eres un oyente regular, ya conocerás: voy a refleccionarme un poco sobre lo ya vivido, y luego pasar a considerar lo venidero. Resulta ser un ejercicio muy adecuado a la temporada del año nuevo. El mes de enero en que nos encontramos ahora toma su nombre del dios romano Jano, una figura insólita que tenía dos rostros, uno mirando hacia atrás, el otro, hacia adelante. Ignoro si Jano sabía cantar; ¿acaso tendría dos voces diferentes? pero hoy, quiero hacer mis reflecciones a través de las muchas y variopintas músicas que nos han traído nuestrxs entrevistadxs durante los últimos nueve meses.

Pero primero,  empecemos con unos datos. Desde nuestro primer episodio, lanzado el 19 de marzo de 2021, hasta hoy, haremos traido al público 19 episodios (éste es el vigésimo) uno cada dos semanas sin fallar, hasta el descanso del mes de diciembre. La mayoría han sido entrevistas de largo formato con gente que vive o trabaja en Santa Ana, CA. Vale recordarnos que cada episodio se lanza en dos lenguas. Seguimos siendo uno de los muy pocos podcasts completamente bilingües en todo el mundo. Cada entrevista se traduce, se re-graba con un actor o actriz, y se re-edita, así como todos los comentarios y materiales introductorios. Tal como me comentó hace poco Wes, uno de nuestrxs soniderxs, ¡esto quiere decir que en efecto hemos producido 40 episodios en tan solo 35 semanas! Estamos bien orgullosxs de este logro.

Nuestrxs entrevistadxs, el alma y corazón del proyecto, representan todas las edades adultas, entre 19  y 80 y tantos años, y un abanico de oficios, entre ellos artistas, músicxs, enfermerxs, maestrxs, limpiadorxs de casa, estudiantes, jardinerxs, profesionales, y más. Varixs tienen hijxs. Y es muy notable, cuántxs son organizadorxs comunitarixs. El activismo es un corriente eléctrico que se mueve por las venas de nuestro show, y es algo que hace de Santa Ana un lugar muy emocionante en que vivir.

Con todo esto, quiero señalar que aún así sólo hemos representado algunos rinconcitos del paisaje humano multi-étnico y multi-lingüe en que nos basamos. Ahora, Jano pondrá el rostro que mira hacia adelante: nos gustaría mucho, poder conectarnos con las comunidades de habla asiática que viven por aquí; así como con más representantes de la comunidad negra; y ojalá que pudiéramos encontrar un modo digno de conectarnos con lxs muchxs santanerxs que actualmente viven sin techo, escarbando sus vidas como mejor puedan entre las calles y callejones, corridxs de los espacios llamados públicos por la policía como si fueran criminales.

Queda por ver si cumplimos estas esperanzas. Claro que no podremos ser todo para todxs, y “Si yo fuera” ya tiene un fin programado para los finales de junio de este año, cuando se acabarán nuestras becas. Pero el año es todavía joven, y nombrar un sueño puede ser el primer paso hacia su realización.

________________________________________

Ahora, me gustaría invitar a ustedes, queridxs oyentes, a acompañarme en un recorrido musical de relámpago por las 40 y tanto canciones que hemos presentado hasta la fecha, tocando en algunos de los temas más llamativos y relevantes que han evocado entre las entrevistas realizadas hasta la fecha. ¡Abrochen sus cinturones de seguridad por favor!

Creo que el tema que abarca todos los demás de nuestro show, el meta-tema por así decirlo, será la cuestión de nuestro lugar debido en este mundo. Cada unx de nosotrxs se pregunta repetidamente sobre esto durante la vida, y cada unx va a llegar a varias respuestas durante su camino. Esta tendencia humana, buscadora y preguntadora, recibe una expresión clásica en la canción “La maza” de Silvio Rodríguez, la cual compartió Laura Pantoja en el Episodio 15.

[ “La maza” ]

La  cuestión de nuestro lugar en el mundo tiene un filo particularmente agudo para lxs migrantes y lxs hijxs de migrantes, una población ya grande en Santa Ana que incluye dos tercios de nuestrxs entrevistadas hasta la fecha . Algunxs de ellxs han elegido canciones que exploran la condición migratoria. Así Jorge Drexler en su canción “Movimiento,” desde Episodio 6 con Lucy Dale:

[Drexler, “Movimiento”]

Y así también Ana Tijoux en “Vengo,” desde Episodio 12 con Marlha Sánchez:

[ “Vengo”]

El gran Atahualpa Yupanqui, cuya música compartió Luis Sarmiento en Episodio 4, expresa la tensión entre el pasado y el futuro, que conoce tan bien lxs migrantes, como un aspecto fundamental de la condición humana, con su joya de canción, “Tú que puedes, vuélvete.”

[Atahualpa, “Tú que puedes”]

El río de nostalgia que fluye por esta canción se ha vuelto a veces un corriente fuerte en nuestro show. Muchxs participantes han elegido músicas que evocan sus tierras natales; y muchas de aquellas tierras están en México. Resulta que nuestro show se ha vuelto, a veces, un recorrido nostálgico de la música regional mexicana; y hay que decir que ¡lxs mexicanxs hacen la nostalgia como nadie! Angélica Sánchez, en el primer episodio de todos, lanzó la pelota con la maravillosa “Canción mixteca,” un ejemplo architípico del anhelo mexicano para lo lejano.

[Canción mixteca]

Laura Pantoja, en Episodio 15, evocó la nostalgia del antaño, con sus recuerdos infantiles de la música de Cri Cri.

[Cri Cri, “La patita”]

El mariachi, símbolo musical mundial de la mexicanidad, evoca para muchxs una mezcla potente de nostalgia y orgullo nacional; Graciela y Jorge Holguín, en el doble Episodio 5, nos guiaron por algunos momentos memorables de esta gran tradición jaliscience.

[Mariachi: Guadalajara – Chapala – La culebra

Pero el mariachi es sólo una música de las muchas del estado de Jalisco. Nuestras entrevistadas Diana Morales, en Episodio 13, y Patricia Flores, en el 19, evocaron las músicas indígenas de la misma zona, recordándonos respectivamente de las músicas P’urhépecha y Cuyuteca.

[Músicas indígenas jalisciences: Tarheperama - El tecolote].

Mientras tanto, en el Episodio 11 Yuritzy Elizabeth nos enseña una nostalia con una vueltita un tanto saleroso de “La tapatía,” un recuerdo musical afectuoso e irónico de la capital de Jalisco, Guadalajara.

[ “La tapatía”]

Pasando al otro lado del istmo, se escucha el orgullo y la lucha de jóvenes indígenas de los litorales de Veracruz, en la canción “Marap,” que compartió Luis Sarmiento en el Episodio 4.

[ “Marap”]

En fin, ningún show que pretende representar las vidas musicales de migrantes sería completo sin la famosa canción de Facundo Cabral, “No soy de aquí ni de allá,” que nos trajo Yax Montaño en Episodio 16.

Yax prefiere la versión icónica de Chavela Vargas, cuya voz inimitable presta otra capa más ambigüedad a una lírica ya ambivalente.

[Vargas, “No soy de aquí…”]

Pero claro, la nostalgia, el recuerdo, la reflección, componen sólo una cara de la condición humana. La otra, estilo Jano, mira el porvenir con valor, resolución, imaginación -- y a veces la rabia por las injusticias vividas.

[ “I’m enough/I want more”]

Los aullidos de Victoria Ruíz de los Downtown Boys, erupcionan de su garganta en contra a los estragos sociales y humanos que inflige el capitalismo en el mundo. Es una de las canciones que aporta Marilynn Montaño en el Episodio 19. El mensaje, aunque no el estilo musical, hace eco con “What it Means” de los Drive By Truckers, en el Episodio 2 con Fernando Agredano, así como con “Robinn Hood Theory,” del dúo hip hop Gang Starr, desde Episodio 18 con Patricia Flores. Ambas canciones protestan abiertamente el racismo estadounidense.

[“What it means” y “Robinn Hood Theory”]

Al corazón de cualquier protesta eficaz es el simple acto de pronunciar la verdad ante el poder. Esto hasta se puede hacer en tono amable, aun feliz, tal como hace el grupo Emma’s Revolution en “Code Pink,” compartida por Kahlo Quinn en el Episodio 9.

[ “Code Pink”]

La protesta directa es sólo un modo de afrontar el futuro, por supuesto. Al lado de la resistencia y la protesta, marchando mano en mano por así decirlo, vienen la imaginación, el sueño, y aun la fantasía, tal como nos recuerda Alberto Cortez con “Castillos en el aire,” en Episodio 10, compartido por Abel Ruíz.

[“Castillos en el aire”]

-- así como el dúo nicaragüense Guardabarranca, quienes nos presentó Cat Quinn en el Episodio 3.

[“Mi Luna”]

La veta rica de la fantasía, de imaginar paisajes, mundos, y futuros alternativos, está minado por todas las edades, como nos enseñan la joven Yax Montaño en Episodio 16, con el vuelo sonoro de “Flight 319,”

igual que el ya maduro Don Apolonio Cortés en el Episodio 14, con el paisaje sonoro evocativo del “Návajo Azul.”

[ “Flight 319” y “Navajo Azul”]

Lo cierto es que el viaje hacia adelante, sea que volemos o que andemos, nos va a exigir mucho. Por eso, creo, otro tema que ha surgido con regularidad entre nuestrxs entrevistadxs es la necesidad de cuidarse bien. Nuestro playlist es rico en canciones dedicadas a suscitar el ánimo y sostener la fé en unx mismx. Por alguna razón que todavía no he podido analizar, este tipo de consejo musical se ofrece principalmente a través del hip hop y el R&B.

Así contamos con Ana Tijoux en “Creo en ti,” compartida por Diana Morales en Episodio 13;

[Creo en Ti”]

en el Episodio 19, Marilynn Montaño comparte “Mija,” un recuerdo tiernísimo del apoyo paternal por la rapera independiente, Vel the Wonder;

[“Mija”]

--y en el Episodio 6, Lucy Dale también toca en el tema del cuerpo como templo, a través de la canción “Holy,” de la poetisa y rapera Jamila Woods de Chicago.

[“Holy”]

En el lado R&B, el Episodio 8 con Brian Peterson nos trajo la animada “Man in the Mirror” de Michael Jackson, mientras en el Episodio 12 con Marlha Sánchez, lucía la más introvertida “Authors of Forever,” de Alicia Keyes

[“Authors of Forever”]

Sin embargo, el ánimo para seguir, para sacarse adelante, y para cambiar el mundo no sólo se encuentra entre las líricas inspiradoras, ni importa cuán bien se cantan; también los movimientos corporales nos inspiran, inspirados en su turno por un kaléidoscopio musical de ritmos y grooves. El baile resulta ser otro tema importante.

El baile tradicional de Veracruz sale en el Episodio 7 con Teri Saydak.

[“Siquisirí” ]

Más pausado, quizás, será el vallenato que nos ofrece Fernando Agredano en el Episodio 2.

[“Los caminos de la vida”]

Y más al lado animado, el son abajeño “Adios California,” compartido por Diana Morales en Episodio 13.

[“Adios California”]

Y el baile aun puede suscitar las memorias tiernas, como hace el vals que comparte Abel Ruíz en Episodio 10, el clásico “Sobre las Olas.”

[“Sobre las olas”]

La música del baile nos mueve hacia adelante fisicamente igual que espiritualmente – aun cuando la letra hable del pasado, como escuchamos en “Septiembre,” la feliz clásica funk que compartió Patricia Flores en Episodio 18.

[“September”]

El buen ánimo y la esperanza que desbordan de Earth, Wind & Fire también se encuentran en el último grupo de canciones de que voy a hablar aquí: las que se tratan de la unidad y el amor, un meta-tema que inspira no sólo a nuestrxs entrevistadxs, sino a todo este proyecto.

[ “La marsallesa”]

La unidad y el amor marchan juntos bajo la bandera de los grandes lemas de inspiración, como salen en los coros de “All You Need is Love,” “Sólo Necesitamos el Amor,” que trajo Teri Saydak al Episodio 7, o bien “We are the World,” “Somos la Tierra,” que compartió Brian Peterson en Episodio 8.

[ “We Are the World fake”]

La unidad y el amor también pueden explorarse a través del acto de identificación radical con el otro – el “Soy tú” que sugiere el gran cantautor español Luis Pastor en su “En las fronteras del mundo,” ofrecida por Yuritzy Elizabeth en el Episodio 11.

[ “En las fronteras del mundo”]

O bien, se pueden encontrar en casa, alrededor de la mesa, conviviendo con seres queridxs, pero con la puerta abierta a quién llegue—un cuadro a la vez familiar y radical que pintan The Highwomen con su canción country,  “Crowded Table,” compartida por Cat Quinn en el Episodio 3.

[“Crowded Table”]

Para mí, todos estos modos diferentes de explorar y expresar la unidad y el amor se trenzan y se suman en la canción dulce, pero igual de poderosa, de Maren Morris que compartió Kahlo Quinn en el Episodio 9, “Dear Hate,” es decir, “Querido Odio.”

[“Dear Hate”]

Queda una canción más de nuestro playlist que he guardado hasta el final, y es la que eligió Angélica Sánchez en el Episodio 1:

[ “Gracias a la vida”]

Quiero cerrar nuestro show de hoy con mis agradecimientos especiales a mi equipo de producción. En el trascurso del último año hemos pasado desde ser un grupo abigarrado de alumnxs y nuevxs profesionales, liderado por una músicóloga sesentena sin experiencia en el podcasting – por mil y una lecciones, grandes así como pequeñas, sobre lo que realmente significa, lanzar y sostener un proyecto mediático comunitario – hasta volvernos, poco a poco, una comunidad propia, chiquita pero estrechamente unida. Es algo que no previ para nada, al empezar este proyecto, y sigue siendo una gran fuente de alegría y felicidad a pesar de todos los retos. ¡Tengo muchas ganas de ver lo que nos traerá este Año Nuevo, así como adónde llevaremos nuestro show en los meses venideros!

¿Quisieran saber más?

En nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, pueden encontrar transcripciones completas en ambas lenguas de cad entrevistaa; nuestro Blog, donde indagamos más en los asuntos históricos, culturales, y políticos que surgen en torno a cada canción; enlaces para oyentes que quisieran investigar un tema más a fondo; y unos imágenes muy chidos. Encontrarán un playlist con todas las canciones de todas las entrevistas hasta la fecha, así como otro playlist elegido por nuestro equipo.

¡Esperamos sus comentarios o preguntas! Contáctennos en nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, o bien pueden participar en la conversación “Si yo fuera” a través de los medios sociales. Estamos en FeisBuk e Instagram. Y, pues, también hay el modo antiguo, de boca en boca. Si les gusta nuestro show, por favor digan a sus amigxs y familiares que lo escuchen. Y por favor, suscríbanse, a través de su plataforma de podcast preferida. Les traeremos una nueva entrevista cada dos semanas, los viernes por la mañana.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, y Wesley McClintock son nuestros soniderxs; Zoë Broussard y Laura Díaz manejan la mercadotecnia; David Castañeda es Investigador de Música; Jen Orenstein traduce las entrevistas entre español e inglés; y Deyaneira García y Alex Dolven facilitan la producción. Somos una entidad sin fines de lucro, actualmente y agradecidamente apoyada por una beca desde la Fundación John Simon Guggenheim, así como fondos desde el Programa de Becas de Facultad de la Universidad de California, Los Angeles, y de la Escuela de Música Herb Alpert en la misma Universidad.

Por ahora, y hasta la próxima entrevista--¡que sigan escuchando unxs a otrxs! Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, y están escuchando, “Si yo fuera una canción.”

English

https://feeds.captivate.fm/siyofuera/

Español

https://feeds.captivate.fm/siyofuera/

La Maza - Silvio Rodrigo

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language
Traducción | Translation

Movimiento - Jorge Drexler

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language
Traducción | Translation

Vengo - Ana Tijoux

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language
Traducción | Translation