Episodio / Episode #
18
November 19, 2021

Patricia Flores

English

Español

English

Greetings and welcome to the latest episode of “Si yo fuera una canción”  -- “If I Were a Song.” We are a community-based podcast and radio show, in which people of Santa Ana, California, tell us in their own words about the music that means the most to them.

ELG: I am Elisabeth Le Guin, your program host, and Director of this project.

This project is based on my conviction that we people in the modern world need to learn to listen to one another; and that music, and all it brings us, is the perfect place to begin.

DAVID: My name is David Castañeda, music researcher here for the SYFUC podcast. I am so happy to be a part of this project, using my scholarly training and my performance experience to bring you the stories, music, and lived experiences of those living right here in Santa Ana

Today’s interviewee has a lot to tell us and tell the world. We talked for a long time, and yet it seems like we barely got started!

Patricia – often known as PJ by fellow organizers and community members – is a human whirlwind of ideas and projects, knowledge and observation, and yet they can drop easily into heartfelt reflection. I was inspired and stimulated by the experience of interviewing them, and I hope you will be as inspired by hearing our conversation.

ELG: Welcome, Patricia. I've been looking forward to interviewing you for quite a long time, and finally have you online, and really, really delighted to have you with us here. And so, I generally start things out with these interviews by just asking the interviewee to say their full name and talk a little bit about what you would like our audience to know about you, what you do, who you are. And very importantly, since this is a Santa Ana focused podcast, what it is that brought you to Santa Ana? Why are you here?

PJ Flores: So my name is Patricia Jovel Flores Yrarrázaval, or PJ for short. My pronouns are she/hers and they/them/theirs. And I grew up in Santa Ana. I like to say I'm born and raised in Santa Ana, but I always feel a little deceitful in saying that because, you know, a lot of people in Santa Ana are born in Fountain Valley Hospital, which is the nearest hospital where you can have, like, a birth and not worry too much. [laughs]

ELG: I did not know that.

PJ Flores: Yeah. So you know, from the moment I left the hospital, I was raised in Santa Ana. And yeah, I have loved my time, you know, living here, growing here, learning about myself in the world through Santa Ana. To, I guess, to say a little bit about myself: So I grew up on Parton Street in Santa Ana, like near Edinger and Flower. I say that for people who are local, I suppose. And then, you know, after that, once my parents split, I went with my mom and we lived on Townsend Street in my grandma's house. So, you know, even though I've moved around quite a bit, I've always been kind of centered in Santa Ana, on based in Santa Ana. And really just appreciative of, I guess, like the ways that, like my parents have, you know, raised me with a love for this place. Both of them, you know, emphasized since I was like a little kid, that we are who we are based on, like, who is around us, who, you know, grows with us, who teaches us. And just like the community that we live in, you know, like how that shapes who we are. They raised me with a sense of obligation that we also have to return the favor, giving back with whatever it is that we are given to share with the world, you know? And the journey is just figuring out what that is, and how best to find your place, right? In your community.

ELG: Absolutely. Absolutely. Wow, what great values to be raised with! And it strikes me how few parents take that attitude with their children. Do you think your parents are unusual in that regard?

PJ Flores: My parents are very unusual in many regards! [both laugh] But I think, you know, it is a sense that I got from the rest of my family as well, my grandmother and all that, but I definitely have to say my parents are unique in the sense that, like, they're... They were activists when I was a kid. I mean, the FBI tapped our house on Parton street when I was a kid!

ELG: You are kidding me.

PJ Flores: Yeah. You know, my mom and my dad went down to Nicaragua during the Civil War to help out with the Sandinistas. And then they went to Cuba for a little bit. I think that's probably what got them tapped by the FBI, was going to Cuba, 'cos they did so back when it wasn't allowed and all that. They really did have this sense because of how they were raised. You know, my mom, during, like the sixties and seventies, you know, she saw the Chicano Movement, the Black Power movement. Back when she was a kid, there was a Black Panther Party in Santa Ana! And the Brown Berets would walk her and my aunties to school to protect them from harassment, from men, you know, from  white terrorism. And so she really grew up with that sense of, like, community takes care of each other when nobody else does. My dad's chileno. He went to go find his own dad in Chile when he was 19, and he became a Marxist because of the Pinochet regime. And so he was protesting down there against Pinochet and all that, and gained a lot of insight about community organizing  and stuff like that. I think both of them because of their unique experiences, raised me with those values of, like, things get done by people coming together to take action. You can't just vote it. You can't just wish for it. You have to actually come together and create the solutions yourself.

ELG: Yeah... Wow, that is quite something to grow up in and be a part of, you know, since your early years. So tell us a little bit about how you have, as you've become an adult, taken that forward into your livelihood and what you spend your days doing.

PJ Flores: Okay. Yeah, absolutely. So I mean, since I was a kid, I felt like whatever I was going to do, it needed to be playing a part and making the lives of working families like my own better, and then also taking care of the Earth and the water that sustains us, right? And that's something that, you know, my mom being of Cuyuteca heritage from the Sierra in Southwest Jalisco, that's something that she raised us with, and my grandma too, and my great-grandma, I got to be raised with all those women! And they really emphasized that like, you know, the land is what births us. And so we have to take care of her while we're here. And... So I think that like as I was a kid, that was a big part of my imagination, imagining what the world could look like. And as I got older, I realized, like, the only way to make that happen is by doing it ourselves, you know? And so I think I be when I was around 18 or 19, I started taking more of an active role, you know, like I started getting involved with, like union organizing. I went off to school at UC Berkeley, I had to work at a cafeteria in Berkeley to pay, you know, to help pay for my tuition and stuff. And so I made friends with all the workers there in the cafeteria, and I ended up joining the union as an organizer.

I think that there's a lot of issues with union organizing, but it's also where I gained a lot of my skills with, like, building a campaign, like planning an escalation. I mean, doing like what I call "radical detective work." TM, trademark. [laughs] Which is like, you know, being able to gather information in often sneaky ways to build pressure on people with power, right? I learned that from my uncle, my uncle, my Tío Juan. He came from El Salvador after being put on a blacklist by the government down there as an organizer. And he, like, was an organizer with the same union, actually. And so he told me, like, "Well, when we want information that the university isn't sharing with us, we'll create a distraction, go into their offices and get the files." And so like, you know, doing those kind of things like, I used the fact that I was working at a cafeteria to sneak people in to do a demonstration inside the cafeteria, you know, try to charm people to figure out what's going on with the university, and stuff like that, and...

ELG: Oh, my gosh, I'm almost wondering whether we should publish this part of the interview! [both laugh] I guess it's all this is in the past now and--

PJ Flores: Statute of limitations...

ELG: --and you are no longer in Berkeley.

PJ Flores: Yeah.

ELG: Yeah. As you know, I'm an employee at a sister university to UC Berkeley --

PJ Flores: That's right.

ELG: -- And have been for a long time. And the longer I stay there, the more unhappy I am made by the structural injustices that the university embodies. Universities are very problematic places from the standpoint of labor justice, and I'm not sure how aware a general listenership might be of that fact, but I'm really glad you brought it up. And I mean, what -- honestly, what better place to learn organizing, you know, real community and union organizing, than Berkeley, California?

PJ Flores: [laughs] Yeah, I will say that.

ELG: It's kind of the mother ship, at least as least as far as the United States go.

PJ Flores: And by no work of the University, I will say. The faculty themselves, a lot of them are actually pretty conservative. But it's really the students that make it that way, and the workers, you know. Berkeley has the reputation that it does because of student movements pushing against the university's abusive policies, to be honest.

ELG: That's really important. Yeah, I'm glad, I'm glad you brought that up. So. Now, today, in Santa Ana, how do you make your living? How does your professional life weave together with this amazing background that you bring to it?

PJ Flores: So right now, I'm Director of Orange County Environmental Justice. So we're a nonprofit here in Orange County dedicated to investigating and then combating environmental injustices and climate injustices across the county. I'm someone who's very based in Santa Ana, it's my home, it's like the community that I love. But also, I see so many similarities between the struggles we face there and folks in Anaheim, Garden Grove, Fullerton, Buena Park. And so I always try to make sure that like, I'm having a perspective across the region, you know? We organize around, for example, like soil lead contamination in Santa Ana. That's one of the major campaigns that's gained us some more notoriety in recent years because we did a study with UCI public health professors like Alana LeBron and Dr. Jun Wu, as well as folks in the history department like Juan Manuel Rubio and the Community Resilience projects at UCI.

Basically what we found in that study was that the majority of the residential samples were far above the CAL EPA threshold for safety, which is 80 parts per million of lead in the soil. And that threshold is at the level at which it notably starts to affect the IQ of children. And so we're talking about neurological damage in that sense, right? And the threshold is 80 parts per million majority, I believe, were, you know, approaching 400 parts per million. But there are particular neighborhoods in central Santa Ana that had upwards of two thousand all the way to four thousand parts per million –

ELG: Yikes!

PJ Flores: -- that's twenty five to 50 times higher than the CAL EPA threshold for safety. And so it's a huge issue that's actually been there generationally. It's not just the lead in the paint, but lead in gasoline, because we've noticed that a lot of the most concentrated areas of soil lead pollution in Santa Ana are around the freeways and around the major streets.

That's where the majority of residents are renters. The majority of residents are low income with no college degree. A majority of residents are from migrant families, usually Latinx families, and the majority of residents are, come from families with children. And since children are the ones that are harmed the most by lead contamination, that's incredibly concerning, right?

ELG: Yeah.

PJ Flores: And so, that's like one of the major projects that we do specifically in Santa Ana, where we've been trying to advocate for policies to not only remediate the lead from the soil, but to do so in a way that is sustainable, right? The practice is usually that they just dig up the dirt and move it somewhere else. Um, and really --

ELG: [laughs] Right.

PJ Flores: --We want, like we're trying to use native California plants and fungi actually, to try to bio-remediate the soil, which is a lot more sustainable and something that all residents can do. And we're also trying to make sure that undocumented residents get access to health care, since most undocumented people aren't covered by Medi-Cal.

We want to make sure that the city puts in work to get them access to health care services, to address the effects of lead contamination.

And we want to push for rent control and tenant protections so that they don't get priced out of the homes that just got remediated, so the landlords don't put the cost of that remediation back on the tenants.

ELG: Onto them, yes, that... Yes, there's so many things -- I think our listeners can probably sense this from as you're talking, when you talk about "environmental justice" in a complex urban community like Santa Ana, you are talking about so many things at the same time.

PJ Flores: And the thing is that lead stays in the air and the soil gets kicked up again through traffic and it gets moved across like this kind of central area of Santa Ana. And so --

ELG: Of course, of course. And then the way, you know, that this deadly stuff that's in our soil and and intermittently in our air, inevitably, it seems, affects the most vulnerable populations in the city. And then that, of course, intersects with issues like rent control.

PJ Flores: Mm hmm.

ELG: You know, so it's like this huge complex chain of factors and they've all got to be dealt with together. It's...

PJ Flores: Exactly. And I do want to just point out, like I mentioned earlier, that the Black Panther Party had a chapter here in Santa Ana. And it was actually the Black Panther Party, locally, but also across the country, that was the first to bring attention to the issue of lead pollution and how that affects communities of color, and just youth in general. A lot of like the black veteran families that are still here, who were the ones that actually fought for desegregation locally in Santa Ana back in the day, seeing how hard they worked and how their families are really dedicated to staying in Santa Ana because of that work that they put in, I think that it's insulting that the city still hasn't done something to remediate the lead. Because they've been bringing attention to this for decades.

And it's something that's already affected so many generations of our children. And lead stays in the bones! If you grew up in Santana and in these areas, it's likely, as bones degenerate as you get older, that lead will be released into your system again. So it's something that's not just affecting youth, but it'll affect all generations at some point.

ELG: Yeah, well, I'm sure this has crossed your mind, but it will affect you. You grew up in central Santa Ana.

PJ Flores: Yeah.

ELG: It's frightening.

PJ Flores: Definitely, it's crossed my mind.

ELG: Frightening. Yeah, it's no joke.

Let's turn our attention to a song! So. Let's see. I'm kind of tempted to just play your first song without actually talking about it for him beforehand. I think it'd be nice to bring in a little music. And just let the the amazing sounds of this song bathe us for a little while.

PJ Flores: I like that.

ELG: And then kind of talk about how it connects to your ideas about where you came from.

MUSIC CLIP #1: Earth, Wind & Fire: “September”

PJ Flores: [spoken over the music] I'm dancing over here. [laughs]

ELG: [spoken over the music] Oh, yeah.

PJ Flores: [spoken over the music] I had to get up for a second to really dance to this.

[end of clip]

ELG: That is like the most cheerful nostalgia I have ever heard.

PJ Flores: [chuckles] I agree.

ELG: You know, I mean, "do you remember"-- it's definitely looking back, right?

PJ Flores: Absolutely.

ELG: But it's just so cheerful!

PJ Flores: Yeah, I mean, like the 21st of September is the last day of summer, right? of summer, I mean – and all the fun that you try to pack in as a kid, like before you have to go back to school. And everything like that. [both laugh]

ELG: Yeah, yeah... And yeah, I think one reason it's so cheerful is it sounds to me like they are having a good time as they sing and play.

PJ Flores: Oh, yeah, no, Earth, Wind and Fire, that is what I love about them, like they sound like they're having the time of their life as they're making the music and like, you can't help but do the same, you know? Like to catch off of that energy.

ELG: Yeah, it's totally infectious, and I gotta say that the YouTube video that goes with this recording, they're having the best time in those costumes! Oh my God!

PJ Flores: That's what I love about music at that time, it's just like the creativity, not just with the music, but like what people were wearing, the way they're performing, like it was all about being, like as out there as you could be creating music from the future, you know,  because like, we needed that right now. That's what I really love about that song.

ELG: Yeah. Yeah. 1978 was when the song was released, so quite a while before you were born, and I was younger than you are now. And but yeah, it... The cheerfulness just carries it through. Tell us a bit about why this song, in response to the prompt of, like, where you come from.

PJ Flores: It was a difficult choice, to be honest, if I can give a shout out to the two other songs that were on the consideration list?

ELG: Oh, please, yeah.

PJ Flores: The other two songs, one was called "El Tecolote," which is a song, it's in the style of  the son del Sur de Jalisco. That was going to be in honor of the town that my family comes from, Tecolotlán, which is in the Sierra Madre Occidental down in like South Jalisco, close to Colima. And, you know, like my family's culture coming from there, like all the lessons that we took from the land there, like being Cuyuteca, has a, you know, a big impact on who I am. And then, "As," by Stevie Wonder, was the other

Choice.

INSERT #1: Lxs Cuyuteca, “El Tecolote”

Listeners to our show may recall Episode #13, our interview with Diana Morales, in which she talked about her P’urhépecha indigenous heritage. The modern Mexican state of Jalisco now includes P’urhépecha as well as Cuyuteca territory, which elides the fact that they are different peoples, speaking different languages.

The Cuyuteca, whose ancestral land is to the South and West in Jalisco, speak a version of Nahuatl, the language of the Aztec Empire; Tecolotlán, the pueblo of Patricia’s family, means “place of the owls.”

And here, in honor of that place and its musical heritage, is a little bit of the son jalisciense that Patricia mentions, “El tecolote,” that is, The Owl.

MUSIC CLIP #2: “El Tecolote”

____________________________________

PJ Flores: But really, like my mom is the person who's had like the most influence, I think, on who I am. And ultimately, I chose "September" because yesterday was her birthday! And so --

ELG: Awwww.

PJ Flores: -- it makes me think of her as well, because she was born in September and everything, and that Libra energy of, you know, like being like in pursuit of justice and pursuit of creating a more beautiful world, but also being able to just have a great time and enjoy yourself with the people you care about. And I think that's like what my mom has taught me the most in my life just how to like, truly love in the freest way. I think that she definitely showed me what compassion was in terms of the way that she showed up for me, the way that even when things are difficult in her own life, like... You know, for a while, it was just the two of us, you know, we shared a room in my grandma's house. My uncle was in the room next to us, my great grandma down the hall, my grandparents next door, you know, it was a packed house and you know, she was going through her own struggles. But even then, she would take the time to hear me and like, like, really listen to me in a way that I felt like other adults didn't. You know? I think that it's very easy, like for adults to dismiss children as not having formed thoughts or anything like that, you know, not having enough experience. But my mom never treated me like that. She always treated me like someone who had my own perspective and needs in the world and that I deserved to be listened to. And I think that's why I chose that song because it represents her for me and because, like, that's how I try to be in the world.  My mom loves Earth, Wind and Fire. Like when she was a kid here in Santana, like cruising down Bristol Street, she used to go cruising with her cousins all the time, listening to funk music. Santa Ana used to be the funk capital, you know, of Southern California, and folks would come from L.A. down to Santa Ana to cruise and to like, just listen to music down here. Actually, you could just be able to hear funk like rolling down the street all the time when I was a kid. And so just --

ELG: Wow. And that's not that long ago.

PJ Flores: Yeah, exactly it kept going, you know, as part of the culture here, that's how like Santa Ana was known. And so I love that my mom taught me that history and shared that part of herself. And so I knew like, I'm doing this the day after her birthday. I have to do this dedication to her.

ELG: Aww...yeah, well, so a shout-out to your mom! That is just awesome in so many ways. So you said Bristol Street, was that the main cruising street?

PJ Flores: Yeah, and you know, that's my suspicion, is that they widened Bristol Street to crack down on cruising. People were always getting pulled over by the police for cruising, especially on Sundays. So many people would come out in their old cars and it's just like everyone just rolls down the street, playing all kinds of funk music. And yeah, so I feel like that's why they widened the street. So you don't see it as much anymore, because traffic's moving a lot quicker. There's like a lot more police up and down Bristol, but you still see on Sundays people rolling around Santa Ana playing funk.

INSERT #2: Cruising culture in Santa Ana

“Cruising” might be called an archetypical USAmerican youth pastime since World War II. A police bulletin I read about the phenomenon describes it, amusingly but tellingly, as “unnecessary repetitive driving.”

The question of how, and to whom, this is necessary or unnecessary, drives a lot of the conflict and repression that surrounds the phenomenon of hundreds—even thousands—of cars, many specially decked out at great expense to their owners, driving slowly up and down the main drag of a community, blasting music very loudly, and the drivers and passengers socializing from car to car.

The nature of the music differs from decade to decade, and from community to community. In the early days of cruising, disco predominated. Funk, as Patricia notes, has long been popular in Santa Ana; so too hip hop. What’s key, it seems, is a powerful bass, boosted by special sub-woofers installed in the cars.

The well-known 1973 film “American Graffiti” portrays cruising but also whitewashes it; the phenomenon is rooted in Chicano culture.

Santa Ana’s Bristol Street has been known for decades as a major destination for cruisers, who come in from all over Southern California despite repeated repressive crackdowns by the police. It seems that it has not occurred to local authorities to open a community dialog around cruising in which the point of view of youth of color can be represented.

ELG: Well, what a what a wonderful little window. I want to sort of circle back, just thinking about the song and thinking about how your mother used music like Earth, Wind and Fire and presumably how you, too, use it. When we're involved in very serious, very urgent work, as you clearly are, the importance of keeping our hearts open and the way music can help us do this. How music supports -- and I'm talking now more generally, I mean, yes, Earth, Wind and Fire, definitely, but they're just one example, I think, [of] how music supports activist work. What thoughts do you have about that?

PJ Flores: Well, you know, to think about that, like I think about how, you know, music is like one of the first like human art forms, right? Because like, we all have a beat already inside of us with our heart, you know? And so like, that is like the first thing that we hear when we're in our parents' womb and all that, is like their heartbeat. And then we're able to match it with our own. And that's like the first kind of harmony right there. And so I think about that in terms of as activists, a lot of times, what we're trying to do is build the communities that we didn't get to have, you know, in a lot of ways, right, like build the lives that we were denied by oppression, right? And try to do that for the people that come after us. And hopefully to fight for something better. I think that music in that way brings us back home. It keeps us with that momentum of being able to like push forward with that same beat in our heart. You know, when we're out in a march, you usually have someone, you know, leading a chant, maybe someone with a drum standing [there], or something like that. And those kind of things remind us of why we're in this, is for that heartbeat and for the heartbeats of the people around us, right? Like what keeps us alive and what keeps us going is the fact that we're taking care of each other. And that's what activism is. It's like showing love for each other.

ELG: Wow! Patricia, I just... It's so beautiful the way you put that, oh my gosh.

PJ Flores: Thank you. Yeah, I think like... Just in general, I think like with Earth, Wind and Fire in particular, I will say, like with all of that, like we need to take time to celebrate and to have joy. When I ask myself, you know, in my most depressed times, like what would make my ancestors the happiest right now? What would make them the most proud of me? What would they want me to be able to freely do right now? And that's dance, you know? Things like Ghost Dance in the United States, which was an indigenous movement to be able to remove colonization from the land, right? And that was criminalized, because people are genuinely afraid of just the ancient power of music, the ancient power of dance to actually have some magic with it to create a change. And I think that like when we're really able to just give ourselves to the rhythm, like lose thought and worry, and just be as we're supposed to be, I think that's one of the most beautiful and healing moments. And I think that we need it both as a momentum for our movements, but also as a time to heal and celebrate before we keep going.

ELG: That's one of those cool, mysterious things that music will do for us. And gosh, yeah, I mean, what a great choice, because Earth, Wind and Fire. They... I feel like so much of their music does precisely that.

Well, thank you for that choice, and I'm going to pivot us right away, actually, to your second song, because I think there's really strong connections, but obviously it's a really super different kind of music.

PJ Flores: Mm-hmm.

ELG: So let's talk about it just briefly before we listen to it. Tell us a little bit about your second choice of a song, the one that in some way for you points toward your hopes for the future.

PJ Flores: Right, so this song we're going to listen to is "Robin Hood Theory," by Gang Starr. And so... Gang Starr is an amazing group, they're a classic hip hop group from like the late eighties to nineties. And it consists of two people: Guru who's the MC, the rapper, and the DJ is DJ Premier. They're a power team like right there, and I have found a lot of healing in their music, especially like songs like "Moment of Truth." But this song in particular, really, I feel, speaks to the way that I would want to show up for youth in my community in particular. And thinking about, like, all of the ways that our families, our ancestors before us have been robbed of the chance to have the livelihoods we need, and given our labor to people who often do not compensate us, for one, but also just use it for our own destruction. And also the image of criminalization, right? And of casting our communities as thieves and stuff like that, and flips it on its head and says, "Actually, no, we're taking what's owed to us.” And so, yeah. That's I guess what I'd want to say about the song.

ELG: Let's listen to it.

________________________________

[MUSIC CLIP #3: “Robin Hood Theory,

Gang Starr]

________________________________

ELG: Wow. So much to talk about here, yeah?

PJ Flores: Yeah, and definitely very explicitly on point.

ELG: I was really saddened to learn that Guru died, that… You know, he says,"I'm sent to be leading the army of the century / mention me and snakes will retreat eventually." But he's not here anymore, and I was really sad to learn that.

It's an amazing, if you will, the political theory that he's putting forth here. And one of the things that really, really grabs me about this, and a lot of his music: he never sounds like he's in a hurry.

PJ Flores: Yeah!

ELG: And, you know, and it's really easy to understand what he's saying.

PJ Flores: Yeah, he calls the style "The Monotone."

ELG: Well, it's not the monotone, I just think his diction is really good, you know? The way in which his  rhyming, his speaking, his rapping, just it comes into our ears very easily, this amazing clarity of expression and powerful vocal presence. And I feel like there's a... There's a lineage going on here. You can hear it.

PJ Flores: Absolutely. And you know, I will say, like with MCs, everyone takes a different approach to these things. You know, like some people come with like a message, right? Other times, lyrics are just about musicality. Like actually, you know, with the last song, "September," in an interview with like one of the singers from Earth, Wind and Fire, he was talking about, "Well, everyone has their interpretations of why I said the twenty first night of September. But actually, we tried a bunch of dates and that was the only one that sounded good with the music!" [both laugh]

ELG: Right.

PJ Flores: And so, you know, a lot of it, sometimes I feel like... With different MCs, sometimes it's about like just being able to rap and use your words in a way that, like, lend its own instrument, even if it's not about the particular word choice. Other folks, it's just about having  clever rhymes. I think Guru in particular was about the poeticism and the message that he was trying to share. I think that comes a lot, you know, with the influence of the Five Percenter Nation out there. And how that was a big moment in New York at the time, recognizing the power of the Black community, you know, in shaping the world and in their own ability to like, create their own justice in this world.

And so when they have that opening line, "Whether it's Islam, Christianity, Judaism, Buddhaism, old schoolism or new schoolism," everyone was coming out at the time with a different philosophy.

And often, you know, I see this in Santa Ana as well. There'll be debates about  different philosophies of organizing, you know, like, "Are you a communist, are you an anarchist, are you a liberal?” All these different like approaches to organizing. And I've never really like ascribed to any label in particular in that way, because, you know, I agree with what the song says! Like, "No matter what we say religion is / if we're not schoolin' the youth with wisdom / then the sins of the father will visit the children." And I love that message, you know, because it's just about like, what are you actually teaching, in terms of the values for each other and for human life, right? Like what are we actually teaching about, the ways that we can, you know, get justice, to provide what we need for our communities to actually thrive in this world? Actually taking action directly, you know, and advocating for that.

ELG: Yeah, it's I mean, there's a kind of implicit question in there that it's like, OK, what have you got to show for your spirituality?

PJ Flores: Mm hmm.

ELG:] You know, what is it doing here in the world for the people that need things?

PJ Flores: Exactly.

ELG: You know, which is a pretty challenging question.

____________________________________

INSERT #3: The 5 percenter nation

Gang Starr, the American hip hop group, comprising of DJ Premier and MC Guru, enjoyed the height of its popularity from 1989 to 2003. They are considered one of the best MC-and-producer duos in hip hop history. Central to their music, as is the case with much of Hip-hop, are the unseen influences of the “Five Percent.”

As the rapper RZA says, “About 80 percent of hip-hop comes from the Five Percent … In a lot of ways, hip-hop is the Five Percent.” I thought it would be a good time to explain this important part of hip-hop history because its reflects the complicated history of race-relations here in the United States and its connection with popular music.

The “Five Percent” can be defined as a Black Nationalist movement, started in 1964 by Clarence 13x (also known as Allah the Father). The main idea is that the ten percent of the population know the truth of existence, and they work to keep the other 85% of the population from this truth; the remaining 5% are those who work to dismantle this oppressive relationship between the 10 and 85%. Clarence’s teaches a set of principles— Supreme Mathematics and Supreme Alphabet—as a way to understand mankind’s relationship with the universe. He also teaches that the first peoples of the Earth were Black people and are therefore responsible for civilization. While the Five Percent utilizes terminology and concepts of Islamic teachings, it is not ideologically or religiously aligned with the Islamic religion; it is closer to a “culture” than a “religion.”

As explained by Christian Baker the common thread of hip-hop in the 70s and 80s, was the “Islamic Black nationalist rhetoric and infusion from the Nation of Islam and the Five Percent Nation specifically. “Hip-hop pioneer,” Afrika Bambaataa connected with Nation of Islam and harnessed that influence in creating the Zulu Nation to “spread socially and politically conscious ideas and ideals.” It would be safe to say that these influences have stayed with the music even to the present day. For more information, check out our references on the is yo fur website to read these articles yourself. Whether or not these hold merit is for you—the listener and consumer of the arts—to decide. Movements like the Five Percent provide a perspective to the cultural and societal struggles that individuals were living through in the second half of the twentieth century here in the United States. There are elements of reclamation, of self-defense, and of resilience in the rhetoric of the Five Percent. How effective they have been in their aim of deepening our understanding of our relationship with universe and between one another remains open to interpretation.

____________________________________

ELG: One of the things that this got me thinking about was that, you know, he does not sound angry, I don't think ever in this whole song. But there is anger coded into his words, very deep anger and and justified anger, and that got me thinking about the the juncture between anger and spirituality.

PJ Flores: Hmm.

ELG: So I'm going to talk for just one minute here about where I'm coming from, which is upper middle class white girl raised in Portland, Oregon, one of the whitest cities in the United States.

PJ Flores: Yeah.

ELG. In the world I come from, anger and spirituality are almost divorced from one another. I think [that for] a lot of people who look like me and have a demographic like mine, spirituality is actually a place to escape from really uncomfortable emotions like anger.

PJ Flores: Hmmm.

ELG: And so I'm just so intrigued by this song, the anger that it encodes, but in a certain sense, does not express. And I just wonder what you think about all of that. What your response might be to, kind of, my perspective on the song.

PJ Flores: Absolutely, so I feel like for one stylistically like the way that Guru does it, so he describes his voice as like "the monotone" or "the drone." I agree, it's not monotone, but like what I think that he tries to do with his lyrical style is, like, he keeps the same tone evenly so you really have to pay attention to his words and what the words evoke, you know? And like, what emotions you get from those, you know?

ELG: Ahhh. OK.

PJ Flores: And so it really takes you on this ride that is completely guided by the poeticism of the lyrics. And so I think that that's like definitely one of the tools that he uses to, like, get people to think through his songs. But definitely, I think that this song is about that unity. And I think that, you know, like from my own experience, you know, like I can say that like, definitely spirituality is a source of refuge, like of comfort, when you experience those feelings of anger about like what we're going through, like... Which you can't help but experience! Like, I was a very angry kid, to be honest, even though I was very loving and like, tried to be as carefree as possible. But I was upset because there's so much pain going on around me. You know, like my family, you know, was harassed by like white supremacist gangs when I was a kid and like, there was my grandparents constantly working and cleaning homes, you know, and thinking about, like, all the health problems that they would get from all this work. I felt very helpless as a child and helplessness leads to anger in a lot of ways, right? Because it's a frustration.

ELG: Absolutely.

PJ Flores: Yeah, and I think that spirituality could only really be a refuge to me when it was also coupled with action. I think in my own spirituality now, it is a source of immense beauty and peace for me to be able to recognize how, you know, countless generations of the people before me have created the life that I have now, and how interrelated we are with the entire world around us. That is my spirituality. It's about how can we create that heaven on earth for all of us now, you know? How can we do that work of creating justice to care for the world that we've been granted, and to care for the people that we've been blessed to be around? That is the obligation of spirituality, in my opinion, is like, if we have these values, if we have these lessons, then we need to put that into action every day. And what we're experiencing right now is a hell instead of a heaven. You know? The world that we live in that's been created by colonization is one that goes against every value of life. It is a system of death. And if we want to rectify that, if we want to restore the relationships between all forms of life here, then we need to take on that spiritual undertaking of confronting things directly, taking action against these systems and restoring the relationships here. It's a spiritual obligation. It's the obligation among people. And I think that all of those are connected when you're in this place of knowing that the oppression of your people is at the center of that destruction.

ELG: Yeah. Yeah, I'm just taking a minute here to absorb all of that. It... There's something very damaged and damaging, I think, about the idea that the realm of "the spiritual" is somehow fundamentally separate from everyday realms. You know, in the incarceration of ideas of divinity and spirit in special buildings, built just for them.

PJ Flores: Mmm.

ELG:  I mean, temples are a lot of things. But if the spirit can't come out of the temple and kind of just inhabit our daily life, you know, when we're mopping the floor or picking tomatoes or marching for justice, or whatever it may be --

PJ Flores: Mm hmm.

ELG:  -- then something's, something has broken, it seems to me.

PJ Flores: Yeah.

ELG: And... Yeah. And, you know, just to circle back around to this amazing song. It's not broken in the song.

PJ Flores: Yeah.

ELG: The, you know, the forward march of this beat and the forward march of his rapping is, it's like very, very integrated. What he's saying needs to happen, and what he's saying he's going to be doing about it, and what he is exhorting us to do about it.

PJ Flores: Yeah, I mean, prayer isn't just what you do, like you're saying, like in a temple or a church. Prayer isn't just when you're petitioning for help, right? in your own privacy. Prayer is in our hands and in our feet. Prayer is in our action and in our words, right? Like when he's busting down doors in defending the poor. That's a form of prayer, right? And you know, I think that all of the things that we do to show up like that are prayer, because they're trying -- they are a petition to create a different life.

ELG: Yeah. Yeah, and hence, of course -- taking it back to Earth, Wind and Fire -- the importance of dancing!

PJ Flores: Mm hmm.

ELG: Because that's your hands and feet too. And it's just taking that prayer out a little farther.

PJ Flores: A lot of the elders I work with, you know, and a lot of the healing I've done for my own self, you know, elders in my family,  Indigenous elders that I've worked with, have talked about how like dancing is like, you know, you're sending energy down to the earth, to your feet, right? And that is like one of the most beautiful forms of prayer. It's something that all animals do in their own way.  And I can say for sure that my family has raised me to know that dancing is incredibly important. My grandpa was known in Tecolotlán, where we were from. And then when he came here, like all the dance halls across Santa Ana would wait for him because he was a really good, like with the zapateado, he could move his feet so quickly.

ELG: Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh, I wish I could have seen him.

PJ Flores: Yeah, I mean, me too. Back in that day... He did still dance when he was older, but I would love to see his swift movement back then, you know?

ELG: [Sure, sure. Well, there are few things more beautiful and moving actually than seeing a very elderly person who in their day was a very good dancer. And the way I mean, it's all about like the economy of their movements, right? Because they probably don't have as much flexibility in the joints and stuff. But the body still remembers, like, "This is how it goes," and you can see that. It's so beautiful.

PJ Flores: Absolutely. I love my grandmother for that reason. If she has music playing, she'll grab one of us and start dancing with us, which I love. She's also a really great dancer since she was a kid, you know? That's really what my grandparents did. They, like every year when there was a festivity in the, in Tecolotlán, as much as they could when they had the money, they would go back and they would dance for -- like they told me up to like four days straight, before they had to take a nap. [laughs]

ELG: I've heard stories like this. Yeah, it's a thing.

PJ Flores: I think my mom carries that tradition forward with Earth, Wind and Fire, you know, in her own way. Like, she'll dance for days straight, and I'm amazed because she can still do that. My mom... OK, I can't say on the air, how old she turned yesterday, but she doesn't look anything like her age, and she dances with more energy than I can at my age right now. So...[laughs]

ELG: Yeah. That's awesome. My goodness. All right, let's wrap things up a little bit. I'm thinking, I want to wrap them up with you by asking just one more kind of complicated, but I think very important question that has to do with this amazing intersection of joyousness and activism that you inhabit. And this would really just have to do, for those of us who are embedded in institutions -- [sighs] How shall I say this? The corruption and the brokenness that comes, as you alluded to earlier, through the fact that we're all living with the consequences of colonialism. It is structurally built into those institutions. Every single one of them, I would say. And, at least certainly the big ones, like my university, like UC Berkeley, that we were talking about earlier -- It's not an option for most of us to simply break with those institutions in order to find our own path. It would harm us economically. It could harm us in other ways.

And what are your thoughts, just in closing, about how we go on working with the flawed systems we have inherited, while holding to the radical ideals that we might have about how we could really change things. And yet we're more or less obliged, many of us anyway, to stay within existing systems that embody values that we may not completely share. How do we work that one through? Do you have any thoughts about that?

PJ Flores: I do! So I will say that, like for one, I never expect any job that I have, like within the System, to lead to liberation in any way for my people. I really appreciate the ways that I've been working with OCEJ to like, investigate environmental justice issues, give those tools to community members. But I stay active in grassroots organizing work that's not paid, because I define myself most by the work that I don't get paid for. So groups like Colectivo Tonantzín, where we work together to like, work with day laborers and domestic workers to fight wage theft and build like that underground worker economies' organizing power right? And then with groups like Protect Puvungna, working with Ajacchemen and Tongva indigenous peoples here to defend ancestral villages and sacred sites. That's the work I define myself by the most because I feel like we're allowed to imagine new worlds in a different way. And so I think it's important to have something outside of your job that allows you to think differently, to imagine something beyond the world that we're forced to engage with every day.

And I think that a big part of that also is recognizing what you bring to the table, what uniquely you bring to the table, you know, like if it's, you know, you’re a coder and, you know really well like how to create websites, how to spread information on social media, you know, everyone has a talent that they bring to the table and finding a way to work that into subverting the systems that are oppressing people.

Because what I always think about is that there are those of us like, like myself, you know, being someone like who was born in this country, who has a college degree, that are allowed to access certain positions within institutions, right? But there is then another part of our community that has no ability to access that. It could be through immigration status. It can be through race, because job discrimination is a huge factor. It could be mental health issues or disabilities, right? that prevent us from working within the capitalist system at a 40 hour work week. There will always be a group of people who is not allowed to access these institutions. And those are the people that I want to fight for: the people who, like my brother who's incarcerated, the people who are houseless, you know? folks who have addictions and mental health issues. Those are the people who will [be] constantly barred by a system that doesn't value them and those are the people who therefore we need to fight the hardest for because they have the solutions. If we fight for the people who are most vulnerable, then we'll be serving all of the rest of the people within this world because, you know, all of us have needs that fit in with that, too. So I think that recognizing that is what keeps me fighting to use whatever talent I have, whatever information I have, to contribute to that and subvert even as I operate within. So -- be a spy! [both laugh] Be, you know, like an informant! And like use whatever you can and throw it towards the people that need it the most. You know, I think that's what I tell folks.

ELG: Wow! Well, that is a great message for us to sort of wrap up with, and I'm not going to talk too much more because I want that message to resonate out past the end of this interview. Be a spy! Subversion! -- My mother used to say, "Subversion through friendliness."

PJ Flores: [laughs] You know, I've had to practice that a few times. I can shout and I can be friendly. Both are helpful.

ELG: It is true, it is true. Oh, my goodness, thank you so much, Patricia. Just a beautiful, beautiful interview and so much wisdom from such a young heart! I predict great things for you, and I am going to be proud and happy to be in your orbit for as long as possible.

PJ Flores: Thank you. That means a lot.

ELG: Yeah. Thank you so much for sharing your insights with us. And I'm going to wrap things up here

Patricia mentions so many things of interest that we were not able to delve into in her interview: The Brown Berets, the little-known role of the Black Panther Party in developing public health policy in the United States, the way lead-poisoned soil correlates with resource-poor communities, the importance of subversion (and some useful tips & tricks about how to practice it), and perhaps most centrally, the ways in which the social, musical, spiritual, and political elements of life weave and braid together inextricably.

We’ve provided some links for further reading and exploration in our Research Bibliography for this episode, and we hope you’ll be able to follow some of the pathways there that we didn’t have time to follow today.

Would you like to know more?

On our website at siyofuera.org, you can find complete transcripts in both languages of every interview, our Blog about the issues of history, culture, and politics that come up around every song, links for listeners who might want to pursue a theme further, and some very cool imagery. You’ll find playlists of all the songs from all the interviews to date, and our special Staff-curated playlist as well.

We invite your comments or questions! Contact us at our website or participate in the Si Yo Fuera conversation on social media. We’re out there on FaceBook and Instagram. And then there’s just plain old word of mouth. If you like our show, do please tell your friends to give it a listen. And do please subscribe, on any of the major podcast platforms. We’ll bring a new interview for you, every two weeks on Friday mornings.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, and Wesley McClintock are our sound engineers; Zoë Broussard and Laura Díaz hold down the marketing; David Castañeda is Music Researcher; Jen Orenstein translates interviews to and from Spanish; Deyaneira García and Alex Dolven make production possible. We are a not-for-profit venture, currently and gratefully funded by the John Paul Simon Guggenheim Foundation, UCLA’s Faculty Grants Program, and the Herb Alpert School of Music.

For now, and until the next interview—keep listening to one another!

I’m Elisabeth Le Guin, and this is, “Si yo fuera una canción -- If I were a song…”

Español

Saludos y bienvenidxs al episodio más reciente de “Si yo fuera una canción.” Somos un podcast y programa de radio, en donde la gente de Santa Ana, California nos cuenta en sus propias palabras, de las músicas que más le importan.

ELG: Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, la anfitriona del programa, y Directora del proyecto.

Este proyecto se basa en mi convicción que nosotrxs, la gente del mundo moderno, necesitamos aprender a mejor escucharnos; y que la música, con todo lo que nos conlleva, es el lugar perfecto para empezar.

DAVID: Mi nombre es David Castañeda, investigador de música aquí en el podcast SYFUC. Estoy muy feliz de ser parte de este proyecto, utilizando mi entrenamiento académico y mi experiencia profesional como músico, para traerles las historias, la música y las experiencias vividas de quienes viven aquí en Santa Ana

Lx entrevistadx de este episodio tiene mucho que decirnos, y que decir al mundo. Hablamos por mucho tiempo, pero parecía que apenas hubiéramos empezado.

Patricia, que a menudo, entre sus colegas organizadorxs y de comunidad se llama por el apodo PJ – es un torbellino de ideas y proyectos, conocimientos y observaciones, con todo templado y aterrizado por una gran capacidad de reflección. Me encontré inspirada al entrevistarle y espero que les pasa igual al escucharnos

ELG: Bienvenida, Patricia. He estado anticipando esta entrevista por mucho tiempo, y ahora me hace tan felíz tenerte aquí con nostorxs. Entonces, yo, generalmente comienzo por preguntar a lxs entrevistadxs por sus nombres completos, y les pido que hablen un poco de lo que les gustaría que la audiencia sepa de ellxs, de lo que hacen, y quienes son. Y, como que este podcast se enfoca en Santa Ana, te pregunto ¿qué fue lo que te trajo aquí? ¿Por qué estás aquí?

PJ Flores: Bueno, mi nombre es Patricia Jovel Flores Yrarrázaval, o, como apodo, PJ. Mis pronombres son ella/elle.  Crecí en Santa Ana. Me gusta decir que nací y crecí en Santa Ana, pero siempre me siento que es un poco engañoso porque, o sea, muchas personas en Santa Ana nacieron en el hospital de Fountain Valley, que es el hospital más cercano donde puedes tener, como, un nacimiento sin tener que preocuparte tanto. [se rie]

ELG: No sabía eso.

PJ Flores: Sí, entonces, desde el momento en que salí del hospital, me criaron en Santa Ana. Y, sí, me encanta haber vivido y crecido aquí, aprendiendo sobre yo misma y el mundo a través de Santa Ana. Bueno, un poco sobre mí: Crecí viviendo en la calle Parton en Santa Ana, cerca de Edinger y Flower. Se lo digo para la gente que es local, supongo. Y luego, cuando mis papás se separaron, me fui a vivir con mi mamá en la casa de mi abuela en la calle Townsend. Entonces, aunque he cambiado de casa varias veces, mi vida siempre se ha centrada, se ha basada en Santa Ana.

Y aprecio mucho como mis papás me criaban con un amor por este lugar. Los dos, pues, enfatizaban desde cuando yo era pequeña que somos la gente en que nos basamos, que nos rodea, la que crece con nosotrx, la que nos enseña. Y, pues, como la comunidad en que vivimos moldea quiénes somos. Me criaron con un sentido de compromiso, también: que tenemos que devolver ese favor, dar a los demás lo que es que tenemos para compartir con el mundo, ¿sabes? Y el viaje es tan solo buscar lo que sea esa cosa, y cómo mejor encontrar tu lugar, ¿no? Tu lugar en la comunidad.

ELG: Total, totalmente. ¡Órale, qué buenos son esos valores con que te criaban! Y me llama la atención cuán pocxs papás y mamás toman esa actitud con sus hijxs. ¿Crees que tus padres son distintxs en ese sentido?

 

PJ Flores: ¡Mis padres son distintxs en muchos sentidos! [ambas se ríen] Pero sabes, creo que es un sentido que me llegó desde toda la familia, de mi abuela y de lxs demás. Pero tengo que decir que mis papás son distintxs en el hecho de que eran activistas cuando yo era niña. Digo, ¡El FBI intervino la línea telefónica de nuestra casa en la calle Parton!

ELG: No me digas.

PJ Flores: Sí. O sea, mi mamá y mi papá se fueron a Nicaragua en los tiempos de la guerra civíl, para ayudarles a lxs Sandinistas. Y después se fueron a Cuba por un tiempo. Probablemente fue por eso lo del FBI, porque en ese tiempo, los viajes a Cuba no se permitieron. Y realmente tenían esas sensibilidades a causa de las maneras en que se criaron. O sea, mi mamá en, pues, los años sesenta y setenta, sabes, vió el movimiento Chicano, el de Black Power. Cuando ella era niña, ¡había un partido de las Panteras Negras, el partido Black Panther, aquí en Santa Ana! Y los de los Brown Berets solían acompañarle a ella y a mis tías a la escuela para protegerlas del acoso de los hombres, o sea, del terrorismo blanco. Y entonces, ella crecía con ese sentido de que la comunidad se cuida entre sí, cuando no haya nadie más que lo haga.

Mi papá es chileno. Él partió para buscar a su propio papá en Chile cuando tenía 19 años, y ahí se volvió marxista por lo del régimen de Pinochet. Entonces él estaba ahí protestando en contra de Pinochet y todo eso, y así aprendió mucho sobre la organización comunitaria y cosas así. Creo que ambxs mis padres, debido a sus experiencias únicas, me criaban con esos valores de, pues, que los cambios llegan cuando la gente se une a actuar. No puedes tan solo votarlo. No puedes tan solo desearlo. Tenemos que juntarnos de verdad y crear las soluciones nosotrxs mismxs.

ELG: Sí… guau, es algo impresionante haber crecido así, y de haber sido parte de eso, pues, desde la infancia. Entonces, cuéntanos un poco de cómo, ya convertida en adulta, lo has incorporado a tu trabajo y a tu vida cotidiana.

PJ Flores: Bueno, sí, por supuesto. Entonces, desde de era niña, he sentido que cualquier cosa que fuera a hacer en la vida, tendría que tratar de mejorar las vidas de familias trabajadoras como la mía, y también de cuidar la Tierra y el agua que nos sostiene, ¿verdad? Y eso es algo que, o sea, siendo mi mamá de orígenes Cuyuteca, de la sierra en el suroeste de Jalisco, pues son valores con que nos criaba, igual que mi abuela, y mi bisabuela, ¡me tocó ser criada por todas esas mujeres! Y ellas enfatizaron el hecho de que la Tierra es la que dió luz a nosotrxs. Y por eso tenemos que cuidarla mientras estemos aquí. Y… bueno, creo que en mi niñez eso formaba una gran parte de mi imaginación, o sea, imaginar como podría ser el mundo. Y al crecer más, me daba cuenta que la única manera de lograr [esos cambios] es realizarlos nosotrxs mismxs, ¿sabes? Así que, creo que cuando tenía unos 18, 19 años, empezaba a tomar un papel más activo, o sea, empezaba a involucrarme en la organización de los sindicatos. Me fui a estudiar en la Universidad de California en Berkeley, y tenía que trabajar en la cafeteria para pagar la matrícula y cosas así. Y me hice amiga de todxs los que trabajaban en la cafeteria, y acabé uniéndome al sindicato como organizadora.

Pienso que hay muchos problemas con la organización de los sindicatos, pero es ahí donde aprendí varias habilidades, por ejemplo, cómo armar una campaña, o planificar una escalación. Digo, hacer cosas que yo llamo “trabajo de detective radical”. Marca registrada [se rie], lo cual es, sabes, poder juntar información, a menudo de manera disimulada, para presionar a la gente de poder, ¿no? Eso aprendí de mi tío, el Tío Juan. Él vino de El Salvador después de que el gobierno ahí lo pusiera en la lista negra por ser organizador. Y resulta que era organizador del mismo sindicato. Y me dijo que “Pues, si queremos información que la universidad no quiere compartir con nosotrxs, creamos una distracción, luego nos metemos en sus oficinas y sacamos esos archivos.” Y pues, [en Berkeley] hicimos exactamente así, por ejemplo, yo aproveché de mi puesto en la cafeteria para dejar entrar a la gente a hurtadillas para armar una manifestación dentro de la cafeteria, o bien, tratando de encantar a la gente para saber más de lo que pasaba con la Universidad, y cosas así…

ELG: ¡Híjole, hasta me pregunto si deberíamos de publicar esta parte de la entrevista! [ambas se rien] Supongo que todo eso ya está en el pasado, y--

PJ Flores: La ley de la prescripción…

ELG:-- y ya no estás en Berkeley.

PJ Flores: Sí.

ELG: Sí… Como ya sabes, yo soy empleada de una de las universidades hermanas de UC Berkeley –

PJ Flores: Cierto.

ELG: -- Y he trabajado ahí mucho tiempo. Y cuánto más tiempo me quedo ahí, más infeliz me siento, por las injusticias structurales que encarna la universidad. Desde el punto de vista de la justicia laboral, las universidades son lugares muy problemáticos. Y no sé cuánto sabría una audencia general sobre eso, pero me gusta que lo hayas mencionado. Y, digo, honestamente ¿qué lugar sería mejor para aprender sobre la organización, pues, la verdadera organización comunitaria, que Berkeley, California?

PJ Flores: [se rie] Bueno, eso sí.

ELG: Es como el punto cero, por lo menos en los Estados Unidos.

PJ Flores: Pero yo diría que, sin gracias a la universidad misma. La mayoría de la facultad en sí es bastante conservadora. Es más bien gracias a lxs estudiantes, y lxs trabajadores, sabes. Honestamente, Berkeley tiene la fama que tiene, debido a los movimientos estudiantiles que empujan contra las políticas abusivas de la Universidad.

ELG: Eso es muy importante. Sí, me alegra que lo menciones. Entonces. Ahora, hoy en día, en Santa Ana, ¿cómo ganas la vida? ¿Cómo se entrelaza tu vida profesional con esta historia personal asombrosa que aportas?

PJ Flores: Bueno, ahorita soy directora de una organización sin fines de lucro, se llama Orange County Environmental Justice, es decir, Justicia Medioambiental del Condado de Orange. Se dedica a investigar y combatir las injusticias medioambientales y climáticas por todo el condado. Yo soy una persona muy de Santa Ana, es mi hogar y la comunidad que amo. Pero también veo muchas similaridades, entre las luchas que enfrentamos aquí, and las de la gente de Anaheim, Garden Grove, Fullerton, y Buena Park… Entonces, siempre trato de mantener una perspectiva de toda la región, ¿no? Nos organizamos, por ejemplo, en torno a la contaminación de plomo en el suelo de Santa Ana. Esta es una de las campañas que nos ha traído un poco más notoriedad en años recientes, porque hicimos un estudio con profesores de la salud pública, como Alana LeBron y el Dr. Jun Wu de la UCI, y también con gente del departamento de historia, como Juan Manuel Rubio y los proyectos de Resiliencia Comunitaria de la UCI. Basicamente, lo que encontramos en aquellos estudios era que la mayoría de las pruebas residenciales estaban muy arriba del umbral de seguridad de la CAL EPA – eso es la Agencia de Protección Medioambiental de California – y el umbral es 80 partes por millón de plomo en e suelo. Es el nivel en que el plomo ya empieza a notablemente afectar el CI de lxs niñxs. Es decir, estamos hablando de daño neurológico, en ese sentido, ¿no? pero la mayoría de las pruebas [que hicimos] se acercaban, creo, a 400 partes por millón. Además hay vecindarios particulares in la parte central de Santa Ana que llegaban a niveles de más de dos mil, hasta cuatro mil partes por millón—

ELG: ¡Híjole!

PJ Flores: -- Eso es 25-50 veces más que el umbral de seguridad de la CAL EPA. Así que es un problema enorme, que realmente ha existido por generaciones. No es tan solo el plomo en la pintura, sino también en la gasolina, porque nos hemos dado cuenta de que muchas de las zonas de Santa Ana con niveles más altamente concentradas de contaminación por plomo en el suelo están cerca de las autopistas y las calles principales. Ahí es que la mayoría de lxs residentes son inquilinxs. La mayoría de lxs residentes son de bajos ingresos, no han cumplido estudios postsecundarios. La mayoría de lxs residentes son de familias migrantes, usualmente son latinxs, y, la mayoría de lxs residentes son familias con niñxs. Y como que los niñxs son lxs más afectadxs por la contaminación por plomo, es increíblemente preocupante ¿no?

ELG: Sí.

PJ Flores: Y entonces, eso es uno de los proyectos principales que manejamos específicamente en Santa Ana, donde hemos estado intentando de abogar por políticas no solamente para remediar el plomo del suelo, pero también de hacerlo de manera sostenible, ¿verdad? Pues normalmente normal es que sacan el suelo y lo ponen en algún otro lugar, pues, y, de verdad—

ELG: [se rie] Claro.

PJ Flores: -- queremos, pues, estamos tratando de utilizar plantas y hongos nativos a California para biorremediar el suelo, que es mucho más sostenible, además es algo que todxs lxs residentes pueden hacer. Y también estamos intentando de asegurarnos de que todxs lxs residentes indocumentadxs tengan acceso a la atención médica, porque la mayoría de las personas indocumentadas no se benefician de Medi-Cal. Queremos asegurarnos de que la ciudad trabaje para darlxs acceso a los servicios de atención médica dirigidos hacia los efectos de la contaminación por plomo. Y queremos abogar por la congelación de rentas y protecciones para lxs inquilinxs, para que no les suban las rentas hasta quedar fuera de su alcance después de la remediación, para que lxs dueños no les cobran a lxs inquilinxs el costo de esa remediación.

ELG: Para que lxs inquilinxs no sean lxs que tienen que pagar… sí, hay tantas cosas—creo que la audencia pueda percibir, a través de todo esto que estás diciendo, cuando hablas de “justicia medioambiental” en una comunidad urbana compleja como Santa Ana, estás hablando de mil cosas al mismo tiempo.

PJ Flores: Y la cosa es que el plomo se queda en el aire, y el suelo se levanta [como polvo] con el tráfico, y atraviesa esa zona, como, central de Santa Ana, y entonces—

ELG: Claro, claro. Y luego, la manera de que, pues, este material tóxico que está en el suelo, y a veces en el aire, inevitablemente llega a afectar a las poblaciones más vulnerables de la ciudad. Y entonces, eso, por supuesto, implica cuestiones como la congelación de la renta.

 

PJ Flores: Mm hmm.

ELG: Entonces, es como una cadena enorme y compleja de factores, y tienes que tratar de todos a la vez. Es…

PJ Flores: Exactamente. Y quiero mencionar, como ya dije, el partido de lxs Black Panthers tenía un capítulo aquí en Santa Ana. Y, de hecho, era el partido de lxs Black Panthers, al nivel local pero también en todo el país, que era el primero en llamar la atención al problema de la contaminación por plomo, y a cómo afecta a las comunidades de gente de color, y a lxs jóvenes en general. Muchas de las familias de veteranxs Negrxs que siguen aquí, quienes eran lxs que originalmente luchaban por la desegregación de Santa Ana en el pasado, pues, al ver qué tanto trabajaban, y cómo sus familias se han dedicado a quedarse en Santa Ana a causa de estas luchas, pues me parece un insulto que la ciudad aún no ha hecho nada para remediar el plomo. Porque han estado llamando la atención al asunto durante décadas. Y es algo que ya ha afectado a tantas generaciones de nuestrxs niñxs. Y, ¡el plomo se queda en los huesos! Si creciste en Santa Ana en esas zonas, es probable que, mientras los huesos degeneran con la edad, van a soltar el plomo en tu sistema de nuevo. Entonces, es algo que no solo afecta a lxs jóvenes, pero que en algún momento afectará a todas las generaciones.

ELG: Sí, pues, estoy segura de que ya lo hayas pensado, pero te va a afectar a ti. Tú creciste en la parte central de Santa Ana.

PJ Flores: Sí.

ELG: Es espantoso.

PJ Flores: Definitivamente, se me ha ocurrido.

ELG: Qué miedo, sí, no tiene ninguna gracia. Bueno, ¡vamos a enfocarnos ahora en una canción! Entonces, a ver. Tengo ganas de simplemente poner tu primera canción sin decir palabra sobre ella antes. Me parece buena idea poner un poco de música. Y tan solo bañarnos un ratito en los sonidos maravillosos de esta canción.

PJ Flores: Me encanta eso.

ELG: Y después, hablaremos de cómo la canción está relacionada con tus ideas sobre tus orígines.

CLIP DE MÚSICA #1: Earth, Wind & Fire: “September”

PJ Flores: [hablando con la música al fondo]

Me tiene bailando aquí. [se rie]

ELG: [hablando con la música al fondo] Oh, sí.

PJ Flores: [hablando con la música al fondo] Me tuve que parar un momento para realmente bailar a esta.

[final del clip]

_____________________________

ELG: Eso es como la nostalgia más alegre que he escuchado nunca.

PJ Flores: [suelta una risita] Estoy de acuerdo.

ELG: Digo, sabes, “Do you remember? -- ¿Tú te acuerdas?”—definativamente se está mirando hacia atrás.

PJ Flores: Totalmente.

ELG: Pero, ¡es tan tan alegre!

PJ Flores: Sí, o sea, el 21 de septiembre es el último día del verano, ¿verdad? Y pues, toda la diversión que uno trata de vivir como niñx, pues, antes de que tienes que volver a la escuela. Y todo eso. [ambas se ríen]

ELG: Sí, sí… Y sí, creo que una de las razones por la cual es tan alegre es que me parece que se están disfrutando mientras cantan y tocan.

PJ Flores: Sí, claro, eso es lo que me encanta de Earth, Wind, and Fire, parece que se están divertiendo un montón mientras hacen su música, y pues, no puedes evitar divertirte también, ¿no? O sea, su energia es contagiosa.

ELG: Sí, es totalmente contagiosa, y, tengo que decir que en el video de YouTube que acompaña la grabación, ¡se lo están pasando réquete bien en aquellas disfraces! ¡Mama mía!

PJ Flores:  Eso es lo que me encanta de la música de esa epoca, como, la creatividad, no solo con la música, pero con el vestimiento, la interpretación en el escenario… se trataba de ser, creo, lo más estrafalario posible, de crear una música del futuro, sabes, porque, pues, lo necesitábamos en aquel momento. Es eso que me encanta de esa canción.

ELG: Sí. Sí. La canción se lanzó en 1978, entonces ¡bien antes de que naciste tú! y cuando yo era más jóven que eres tú ahora. Y, pues, sí… la alegría nomás nos lleva.

Cuéntanos un poco de por qué esta canción, en terminos de la cuestión de tus orígenes.

PJ Flores: Era una decisión dificil, te lo digo. ¿Puedo mencionar las otras dos canciones que estaban en la lista?

ELG: Claro, por favor, sí.

PJ Flores: Una se llama “El Tecolote,” que es una canción en el estilo del son del sur de Jalisco. Eso hubiera sida para honrar al pueblo de donde viene mi familia, Tecolotlán, que está en la Sierra Madre Occidental, en el sure de Jalisco, cerca de Colima. Y, sabes, la siendo la cultura de mi familia de allí, pues todas las enseñanzas que recibimos de la tierra allí, por ser Cuyuteca, tienen una gran influencia en quien soy… Y, la otra elección era [la canción] “As,” por Stevie Wonder.

____________________________________

ENCARTA #1: Lxs Cuyuteca, “El Tecolote”

Tal vez nuestrxs seguidorxs recuerdan el Episodio #13, nuestra entrevista con Diana Morales. Allá, Diana habla de su ascendencia indígena P’urhépecha.

El estado moderno mexicano de Jalisco abarca los territorios P’urhépecha así como los de lxs Cuyuteca, y así el mapa actual borra el hecho de que la región hospedaba pueblos diferentes con lenguajes y culturas distintos. Lxs Cuyuteca, cuyos territorios ancestrales quedan en el SurOeste de Jalisco, hablan una forma de Náhuatl, la lengua del Imperio Azteca. Tecolotlán, el pueblo de la familia de Patricia, quiere decir “lugar de los buhos.”

Aquí, en honor de ese lugar y su tradición musical, escuchamos un rato al son jalisciense que menciona Patricia, “El tecolote.”

__________________________________

MUSIC CLIP #2: “El Tecolote”

____________________________________

PJ Flores: Pero, realmente, mi mamá es la persona quien más me ha influido, creo, en quien soy. Y entonces acabé escogiendo “September” ¡porque ayer fue su cumpleaños! Y entonces—

ELG: Awww.

PJ Flores: --me hace pensar en ella, porque nació en septiembre, y esa energía de Libra, de, es de, buscar la justicia, procurar crear un mundo más hermoso, pero también poder tan solo pasar un buen rato y disfrutarse con la gente a quién quieres.

Y creo que es la mayor enseñanza que mi mama me ha dado en la vida: como amar, verdaderamente amar en la forma más liberada. Yo creo que definativamente me ha enseñado lo que es la compasión, por la manera en que se presenciaba en mi vida, aún cuando los asuntos de su propia vida fueran dificiles, como… Sabes, por un tiempo eramos nada más las dos, o sea, compartíamos un cuarto en la casa de mi abuela. Mi tío estaba en el cuarto al lado de nosotras, mi bisabuela estaba al final del pasillo, y mis abuelxs en el cuarto vecino, sabes, la casa estaba abarrotada, y, pues, ella pasando por sus propias luchas. Pero aún así, ella realmente tomaba el tiempo de ecuscharme, en una manera de que me parecía que lxs demás adultxs no hacían. ¿Sabes? Creo que es muy fácil, pues, para lxs adultxs a desechar a lxs niñxs, por no tener los pensamientos plenamente desarrollados, o bien por no tener la experiencia suficiente. Pero mi mamá jamás me trataba así. Siempre me trataba como alguien que tenía su propia perspectiva, y necesidades, como una persona que merecía estar escuchada. Y creo que es por eso que elegí esa canción, porque, pues, es cómo trato de ser en el mundo.

A mi mamá le encanta Earth, Wind, and Fire. Cuando ella era chavita aquí en Santa Ana, iría a hacer cruising en la calle Bristol. Haría cruising con sus primxs todo el tiempo, escuchando a la música funk. Antes Santa Ana era la capital de la música funk en el Sur de California y la gente solí llegar desde Los Ángeles a Santa Ana para hacer cruising y, pues, a tan solo escuchar la música aquí. De hecho, cuando yo era niña uno podría escuchar la funk en la calle todo el tiempo, y entonces--

ELG: Guau. Y eso ni fue hace tanto tiempo.

PJ Flores: Sí, exactamente, la cosa seguía, o sea, como parte de la cultura aquí, Santa Ana tenía bastante fama por eso. Y bueno, me encanta que mi mamá me enseñara esa historia, y compartiera esa parte de su historia. -- Entonces yo sabía, que como que estoy haciendo esta entrevista en el día después de su cumple, pues tenía que dedicar la canción a ella.

ELG: Aww… pues, sí, entonces ¡un saludo a tu mamá! Eso sí es padrísimo, en muchos sentidos. Entonces, dijiste que la Calle Bristol era la calle principal para cruising?

PJ Flores: Sí, y sabes, sospecho que [el proyecto actual] de ensanchar la calle Bristol es precisamente para reprimir el cruising. La policia siempre solía parar a la gente por hacer cruising, sobre todo en los domingos. Tanta gente saldria en sus carros viejos, y es como todxs circulando lentamente por la calle, tocando todo tipo de música funk. Y, sí, creo que fue por eso que ensancharon la calle. Entonces ya no lo ves tanto, porque el tráfico se está moviendo mucho más rápido. Así como hay mucho más policías por Bristol… pero los domingos todavía ves a personas andando en carros por Santa Ana, tocando funk.

_________________________________

INSERT #2: cultura del “Cruising” en Santa Ana

El “cruising” puede denominarse una afición architípica estadounidense desde la 2da Guerra Mundial. Leí un boletín policiaco sobre el fenómeno que lo describe, chistosamente pero también reveladoramente, como el acto de “manejar repetidamente e innecesariamente.”

Esa es la cuestión, por supuesto: cómo, y para quiénes, sea necesaria o innecesaria. Hay bastante conflicto y represión que rodea este fenómeno de centenares—a veces, miles—de coches, varios arreglados especialmente a gran costo de sus dueñxs, rodando lento por arriba y por abajo de la calle principal de una comunidad, con la música a tope, y lxs conductorxs y pasajerxs saludándose de carro en carro.

La naturaleza de la música cambia según la decada y la comunidad. En los años tempranos del “cruising” predominaba la disco. La Funk, como nota Patricia, ha sido popular en Santa Ana, igual que la hip hop. El elemento clave parece ser un bajo poderoso, aumentado por bocinas especiales instaladas en los coches.

La película conocida de 1973, “American Graffiti” se trata del cruising mientras pasa por alto del hecho de que el fenómeno se arraiga en la cultura Chicana. La Calle Bristol en Santa Ana ha tenido fama durante décadas como un lugar importante del cruising; a pesar de represiones repetidas de la policía, la gente acude aquí desde todas partes del Sur de California. Hasta la fecha, a las autoridades no se ha ocurrido la posibilidad de abrir un diálogo comunitario en torno al cruising, en que la perspectiva de lxs jóvenes de color pueda representarse.  

__________________________________

ELG: Pues qué bonita ventanilla [sobre una costumbre cultural...]

Quiero volver un poco para pensar en la canción y en como tu mamá -- y me imagino que tú también -- utilizan música como la de Earth, Wind and Fire. Cuando estemos involucradxs en trabajo muy serio, muy urgente, como evidentemente estás tú, se vuelve muy importante mantener nuestros corazones abiertos, y la música nos ayuda en eso. ¿Cómo es que la música—y ahora estoy hablando en general, no solamente de Earth, Wind and Fire, porque ellos son un ejemplo entre muchos – cómo es que la música apoya el trabajo activista? ¿Cuáles son tus pensamientos en torno a esta cuestión?

PJ Flores: Bueno, sabes, pienso en como la música es una de las manifestaciones artísticas primordiales humanas, ¿no? Porque, pues, todxs ya tenemos un ritmo dentro de nosotrxs, el del corazón, ¿no? Es la primera cosa que escuchamos dentro de la matriz, los latidos. Y luego nos unimos con ese ritmo, con nuestros propios latidos.  Y entonces ahí lo tienes, como la armonia primordial. Y bueno, al pensarlo en terminos de ser activista, la mayoria del tiempo, lo que estamos tratando de hacer es construir las comunidades que no nos tocó tener. Construir las vidas que la opresión nos ha negado, ¿no? Y luego, intentar hacerlo para lxs que vienen después. Y con esperanza, luchar para algo mejor.

Creo que en este sentido la música nos trae de vuelta a casa. Nos da el ímpetu a seguir adelante, con ese mismo ritmo en nuestro corazón. Como, cuando estés en una manifestación, a menudo tienes a algiuén que encabeza un canto comunal, quizás con un tambor, o algo así. Y esas cosas nos recuerdan de la razón por la cual estamos en esto, es por ese latido, así como los latidos de la gente que nos rodea, ¿no?

El hecho de que nos estamos cuidando entre nosotrxs es lo que nos da animo a seguir adelante. Y eso es el activismo. Es como demostrar el amor entre nosotros.

ELG: ¡Guau! Patricia, yo… muy hermosa la forma en que has dicho eso. Estoy sobrecogida.

PJ Flores: Gracias. Sí, pienso, como… en  general, y particularmente con Earth, Wind and Fire, diría que, con todo lo que vivimos, tenemos que tomar tiempo para celebrar y tener alegria. Cuando me siento deprimida me pregunto, como, “¿Qué les haría más felíz a mis ancestros en este momento? ¿Qué les haría lo más orgullosxs de mí? ¿Qué les gustaría que yo pudiera tener la libertad de hacer en este momento?” Y la respuesta es, pues, bailar, ¿sabes? Cosas como el Baile de los Fantasmas, el Ghost Dance, in los Estados Unidos. Era un movimiento Indígena para liberar la tierra de la colonialización, y se criminalizó. Porque la gente realmente tiene miedo ante el poder antiguo de la música, el poder antiguo de la danza, que realmente llevan algo de magia para generar los cambios. Y creo que cuando nos podamos entregar al ritmo, o sea dejar de pensar y de preocuparnos, y tan solo ser como debemos ser, creo que es uno de los momentos más hermosos, más curativos. Y creo que lo nesesitamos, tanto para dar ánimo a nuestros movimientos, como para sanarnos y celebrar antes de continuar.

ELG: Eso es una de las cosas geniales y misteriosas que la música hace para nosotroxs. Y, guau, sí, digo, qué buena elección, porque Earth, Wind and Fire, ellos… Me parece que mucho de su música hace precisamente eso. ¡Bueno! gracias por esa canción, y ahora vamos a pasar a la segunda, porque creo que hay unas conexiones muy fuertes. Aunque obviamente es un tipo de música super distinto.

PJ Flores: Mm-hmm.

ELG: Bueno, vamos a platicar un poco sobre la canción antes de escucharla. Cuéntanos un poco de esta segunda canción, la que en algun sentido indica tus esperanzas para el futuro.

PJ Flores: Bueno, pues, la canción es "Robin Hood Theory", o “Teoría de Robin Hood” por Gang Starr. Y bueno… Gang Starr es un grupo fantástico, un grupo de hip hop clásico de finales de los ochenta, comienzo de los noventa. Y consiste en dos personas: Gurú, el MC, el rapero, y el DJ, Dj Premier. Es un gran equipo, por cierto, y he encontrado mucha sanación en su música, especialmente en canciones como “Moment of Truth,” es decir, “Momento de la verdad.” Pero esta canción en particular, “Robinn Hood Theory,” muestra la forma en que me gustaría apoyar a lxs jóvenes en mi comunidad. Y pensando en, como se han robado a nuestras familias, y de nuestrxs antrepasadxs, de la oportunidad de tener la vivienda que necesitamos, como hemos prestado nuestro labor a personas que frecuentamente ni nos paguen, y que también lo utilizan para nuestra propia destrucción. Y también está el imagen de la criminalización, ¿no? de estereotipar nuestras comunidades como ladrones, cosas así. Esta canción se revolca todo eso, y dice “Realmente no es así, nomás estamos tomando lo que nos deben.” Y entonces, sí. Eso es lo que quiero decir de la canción.

ELG: Vamos a escucharla.

____________________________________

[CLIP DE MÚSICA #2: “Robin Hood Theory, Gang Starr]

____________________________________

ELG: Órale. Hay tanto que se puede decir, ¿no?

PJ Flores: Sí, y muy explícitamente pertinente.

ELG: Me dió mucha tristeza saber que Gurú se falleció, que… Es que él dice "I'm sent to be leading the army of the century / mention me and snakes will retreat eventually.", o bien, “Me mandaron a liderar el ejercito del siglo/ Me mencione y los serpientes se huirán eventualmente.” Pero él ya no está aquí, y me puse muy triste enterarme de eso. Es una teoria política impresionante que él presenta aquí. Y otra de las cosas de esta canción, y mucho de su música es que él nunca parece llevar prisa.

PJ Flores: ¡Sí!

ELG: Y, sabes, es muy fácil entender lo que dice.

PJ Flores: Sí, le llama a su estilo como “El Monótono”.

ELG: Bueno, no tanto el monótono, es que yo creo que tiene muy buena pronunciación, ¿sabes? La forma en que sus rimas, su habla, su rap, entran el oído de manera muy fácil, con esa claridad de expresión y imponente presencia vocal. Y me parece que hay un… un linaje aquí. Se lo puedes escuchar.

PJ Flores: Por cierto. Y, bueno, con los MCs, todxs tiene su manera distinta. O sea, algunxs vienen con un mensaje, ¿no? Otras veces las líricas tan solo se tratan de la musicalidad. Por ejemplo, con la última canción, “September”, uno de los cantantes de Earth, Wind, and Fire dijo en una entrevista que “Todo mundo tiene su interpretación de por qué dije la vigésima primera noche de septiembre. Pero, en realidad, es que lo intentamos con varias fechas y ¡esa fue la única que se iba bien con la música!” [ambas se rien]

ELG: Eso.

PJ Flores: Y entonces, a veces siento que… con diferentes MCs se trata tan solo de poder rapear y usar tus palabras en un estilo que presta así su propio instrumento, sin preocuparse tanto de la elección de palabras. Para otrxs, lo importante es tener rimas ingeniosas. Creo que a Gurú en particular le importaba el poeticismo y el mensaje que quería compartir. Creo que mucho de eso viene con, pues, la influencia de The Five Percenter Nation. La llamada “Nación de los 5 por ciento.” Y bueno, era un gran momento en Nueva York en su tiempo, reconociendo el poder de la comunidad Negra, en moldear el mundo, y su propia habilidad de crear una justicia propia en este mundo. Y entonces, cuando sale con esa línea de “Que sea islamismo, cristianidad, judaismo, budismo, vieja escuelismo, o nueva escuelismo”, es que en aquel tiempo todxs salían con una filosofía diferente.

Y, sabes, a menudo lo veo en Santa Ana también. Hay debates sobre las diferentes filosofías de la organización, o sea, como “¿Eres comunista, eres anarquista, eres liberal?” Todas esas diferentes maneras de organizar. Y yo nunca me he adscrito así a ninguna etiqueta en particular, porque, pues ¡estoy de acuerdo con lo que dice la canción! Como dice, “No importa lo que decimos que es la religión/si no enseñamos a lxs jóvenes con sabiduria/así los pecados de los padres vistarán a lxs niñxs.” Y me encanta este mensaje, sabes, porque se trata de la cuestión de, ¿que realmente estás enseñando, en terminos de valorarnos, de valorar la vida humana, ¿no? O sea, ¿qué es lo que realmente estamos enseñando de las formas en que podemos alcanzar la justicia, podemos proveer lo que realmente necesitamos para que nuestra comunidades florezcan en este mundo? Realmente tomando acción directa, sobes, y abogando por eso.

ELG: Sí, digo, hay una especie de pregunta implícita, que sería como, “Bueno, ¿qué has logrado en el mundo con tu espiritualidad?”

PJ Flores: Mm hmm.

ELG: O bien, “¿qué está haciendo aquí en el mundo para la gente necesitada?”

PJ Flores: Exacto.

ELG: Y, pues, es una pregunta retadora.

____________________________________

INSERT #3: La Nación de lxs 5 por ciento

Gang Starr, el grupo de hip hop estadounidense, compuesto por DJ Premier y MC Guru, disfrutó del clímax de su popularidad entre los años 1989 y 2003. Se les considera uno de los mejores dúos de MC y productores en la historia del hip hop.En la música que hicieron Gang Starr—como es el caso con mucho del genero—son fundamentales las

influencias invisibles del "Five Percent” o “el cinco por ciento”. Como dice el rapero RZA,

"Aproximadamente el 80 por ciento del hip-hop proviene del cinco por ciento ... En muchos sentidos, el hip-hop es el cinco por ciento". Pensé que sería un buen momento para explicar esta parte importante de la historia del hip-hop porque refleja la complicada historia de las relaciones raciales aquí en los Estados Unidos y su conexión con la música popular. El "cinco por ciento" se puede definir como un movimiento nacionalista Afroamericano, iniciado en 1964 por Clarence 13x (también conocido como Allah el Padre). La idea principal es que el diez por ciento de la población conoce la verdad de la existencia, y trabaja para mantener al otro 85% de la población alejada de esta verdad; el 5% restante son los que trabajan para desmantelar esta relación opresiva entre el 10 y el 85%. Clarence13X enseña un conjunto de principios, Matemáticas Supremas y Alfabeto Supremo, como una forma de entender la relación de la humanidad con el universo. También enseña que los primeros pueblos de la Tierra fueron Africanos y crearon la civilización. El cinco por ciento utiliza terminología y conceptos de las enseñanzas islámicas, aunque no está ideológica o religiosamente alineado con la religión islámica; es mas una "cultura" que una “religión".

Como explicó Christian Baker, el hilo conectando hip-hop en los años 70 y 80 fue "retórica Afro-Islamica y también conceptos de la Nación del Islam (NOI) y la Nación del Cinco Por Ciento (o Nación de Dioses y Tierras) específicamente. Afrika Bambaataa, se conectó con la Nación del Islam y aprovechó esa influencia para crear la Nación Zulu para "difundir ideas sociales y políticamente conscientes". Estas influencias se han mantenido con la música hasta el día de hoy. Para obtener más información, consulte las referencias enumeradas en nuestro sitio web para este episodio. Usted, el oyente y consumidor de las artes, debe decidir si estas doctrinas tienen mérito o no. Movimientos como el Cinco por ciento brindan una perspectiva de las luchas culturales y sociales que las gente vivían en la segunda mitad del siglo XX aquí en los Estados Unidos. Hay elementos de autodefensa y de resilienciaen la retórica del cinco por ciento. Cuán efectivos han sido en su meta de profundizar nuestra comprensión del universo y nuestra relación entre nosotros permanece abierta a la interpretación.

___________________________________

ELG: Una de las cosas en que esto me provoca pensar es, que, sabes, él, Gurú, no suena enojado, creo en toda la canción. A pesar de que la rabia está codificada en sus palabras, una rabia muy honda y justificada. Eso me hace pensar en la coyuntura entre la rabia y la espiritualidad.

PJ Flores: Hmm.

ELG: Entonces, hablaré solo por un momento aquí sobre de donde vengo yo, que es de haber sido una niña blanca de la clase media alta, criada en Portland, Oregon, una de las ciudades más blancas en los Estados Unidos.

PJ Flores: Sí.

ELG: En ese mundo de donde yo vengo, la rabia y la espiritualidad estan casi divorciadas, la una de la otra. Creo que para mucha gente que se parece a mí, y que viene de un demográfico como el mío, la espiritualidad se ha convertido en un lugar donde se puede escapar las emociones muy incómodas, como la rabia.

PJ Flores: Hmmm.

ELG: Y entonces, estoy intrigada por esta canción, y por la rabia encodificada en ella, pero de cierta manera no expresada. Y me pregunto qué opinas de todo eso. Cuál sería tu respuesta a, pues, mi perspectiva de la canción.

PJ Flores: Claro, bueno, para comenzar, el estilo que Gurú emplea, él lo describe como “el monótono.” Estoy de acuerdo de que no es monótono; pero lo que creo que él trata de hacer con su estilo lírico es pues, mantener un mismo tono uniforme para que tengas que realmente poner atención a sus palabras y lo que las palabras evocan, ¿sabes? Y, como, cuáles emociones te suscitan, ¿no?

ELG: Ahhh. Bueno.

PJ Flores: Y entonces, te lleva en un recorrido completamente guiado por el poeticismo de las letras. Y entonces creo que eso es definitivamente una de las herramientas que él utiliza para hacernos pensar a través de sus canciones. Y creo que esta canción se trata de esa unidad. Y creo que, en cuanto a mi propia experiencia, definitivamente puedo decir que la espiritualidad es una fuente de refugio, de confort, para cuando te sientes enojo por las cosas por las cuales estamos pasando, como… ¡Qué es imposible no experimentarlo! Honestamente, yo era una niña muy enojada, aunque era muy cariñosa y trataba de ser lo más despreocupada posible. Pero estaba muy inquieta, por todo el dolor que me rodeaba. Como, a mi familia le acosaron pandillas de la supremacia blanca cuando yo era pequeña, y, pues, mis abuelxs trabajaban constantemente limpiando casas, y preocupándome por todos los problemas de salud que les causaría todo ese trabajo. En mi niñez, me sentía muy indefensa, y bueno, sentirse así crea rábia, ¿no? Porque es muy frustrante.

ELG: Claro que sí, claro.

PJ Flores: Sí, y creo que para mí, la espiritualidad solo podría ser un refugio si viniera emparejada con la acción. Pensando en mi propia espiritualidad ahora, es una fuente imensa de hermosura y paz poder reconocer como, pues, innumerables generaciones de personas que vinieron antes han creado la vida que yo ahora vivo, y cuán interrelacionadxs estamos con todo el mundo que nos rodea. Eso es mi espiritualidad. Se trata de ¿cómo podemos crear el Cielo aquí en la tierra, para todxs nosotrxs, ahora mismo, sabes? ¿Cómo podemos hacer aquel trabajo de establecer la justicia, cuidar al mundo que se nos ha otorgado, y cuidar de las personas que estamos bendecidxs a tener a nuestro alrededor? En mi opinion, eso es la obligación de la espiritualidad, y si tenemos esos valores, esas lecciones, pues tenemos que ponerlos en acción todos los días. Y lo que estamos viviendo ahora es un infierno en lugar de un cielo, ¿sabes? El mundo en que vivimos, creado por la colonialización, es uno que va en contra de todos los valores de la vida. Es un sistema de la muerte. Y si lo queremos rectificar, si queremos restaurar las relacciones entre todos los seres vivos aquí, pues tendremos que emprender ese acto espiritual de enfrentar las cosas directamente, tomar acción contra esos sistemas mortíferos, y restaurar las relaciones aquí. Es una obligación espiritual, la obligación entre la gente. Y creo que todo eso está conectado, cuando sabes que la opresión de tu pueblo está al centro de esa destrucción.

ELG: Sí. Sí, nada más estoy tomando un rato para absorber todo eso. Es… hay algo bastante dañado, y que también hace daño, creo, en la idea de que “lo espiritual” (en comillas) es de alguna manera fundamentalmente separado de la vida cotidiana. Como, en el encarcelamiento de las ideas de divinidad y espíritu en los edificios especiales, construidos tan solo para ellxs.

PJ Flores: Mmm.

ELG: Digo, los templos pueden ser muchas cosas; pero si el espíritu no puede salir del templo y, pues, habitar en nuestras vidas diarias, digamos cuando estemos atrapeando el piso, or recogiendo tomates, or marchando para la justicia, o lo que sea—

PJ Flores: Mm hmm.

ELG: - entonces algo, algo se ha roto, me parece.

PJ Flores: Sí.

ELG: Y… sí. Y, sabes, para volver a esta canción fantástica: en la canción no está rota.

PJ Flores: Sí.

ELG: El ímpetu de este ritmo, y de su rap, es como muy, muy integrado. Lo que él dice tiene que pasar, lo que él dice que él va a hacer sobre esto, y lo que nos está exhortando que hagamos sobre esto.

PJ Flores: Sí, o sea, rezar no es tan solo algo que uno hace, como dices, en un templo o en una lglesia. Rezar no es tan solo pedir ayuda, ¿verdad? cuando estás solx. El rezo existe en las manos y en los pies. El rezo está en nuestras acciones y palabras, ¿no? Como cuando él, Gurú, está rompiendo puertas para defender a lxs pobres, es una forma de rezar, ¿no? Y sabes, pienso que todo lo que hacemos en apoyo de este tipo de acción directa es oración, en efecto, porque es un intento, es una petición por una vida diferente.

ELG: Sí, sí, y entonces, claro—volviendo a Earth, Wind, and Fire—¡la importancia del baile!

PJ Flores: Mm hmm.

ELG: Porque eso también está en las manos y los pies. Así llevamos a la oración un poquito más allá.

PJ Flores: Muchas de lxs ancianxs con qui´nes trabajo, y también mucho de la curación que he hecho para mí misma con gente mayor en mi familia, así como gente Indígena con quien he trabajado, me han hablado de cómo cuando bailemos, enviamos la energia a la tierra, con tus pies, ¿no? Y que es una de las formas más bellas de rezar. Es algo que todos los animales hacen, según su propia manera. Y puedo decir, sin duda, que mi familia me criaba con el saber de que el baile es increiblemente importante. Mi abuelo era conocido [como bailarín] en Tecolotlán, que es de dónde venimos. Y luego, cuando vino aquí, todos los salones de baile en Santa Ana lo esperaban, porque era realmente bueno, era muy veloz con sus pies en el zapateado.

ELG: Ay, diós mío, me hubiera encantado verlo.

PJ Flores: Sí, pues, a mí también. En esos días… Todavía bailaba cuando era mayor, pero me hubiera encantado ver sus movimiento rápidos de aquellos tiempos, ¿sabes?

ELG: Claro, claro. Bueno, de hecho hay pocas cosas más bellas y conmovedores, que ver a una persona ya ancianx que en su tiempo era muy buenx para el baile. Y la forma en que, bueno, es todo sobre la economía de sus movimientos, ¿no? Porque probablemente no tienen tanta flexibilidad en sus coyunturas, y eso. Pero el cuerpo todavía recuerda, como, “Así va.” Y lo puedes ver. Es tan hermoso.

PJ Flores: Oh sí, por cierto. Por eso quiero a mi abuela. Si hay música, ella agarra unx de nosotrxs y se pone a bailar, que es algo que me encanta. Ella también ha sido muy buena para bailar desde que era pequeña, ¿sabes? Eso es realmente lo que hacían mis abuelxs. Cada año, cuando había algun festejo en Tecolotlán, en cuanto lo pudieran cuando tuvieran el dinero, acudirían y bailarían por—me han dicho que hasta por cuatro días sin parar, antes de que tuvieran que echar una siesta. [se ríe]

ELG: He oído de historias como esa. Sí, es algo.

PJ Flores: Yo creo que mi mamá mantiene esa tradición viva en su propia manera, con lo de Earth, Wind, and Fire. O sea, ella baila por días sin parar, y me asombra que todavía puede hacerlo. Mi mamá… Bueno, no puedo revelar en el podcast, cuantos años cumplió ayer, pero, ella no se ve para nada como que tiene la edad que tiene, y baile con más energía que yo puedo con mí edad de ahora, entonces… [se rie]

ELG: Sí. Qué genial. Órale. Bueno, nos vamos acercando al fin de la entrevista. Estoy pensando que me gustaría concluir contigo con una pregunta más. Es un poco complicada, pero importante, creo…tiene que ver con esa intersección increíble de la alegria y el activismo, en que demoras. Y esto tiene que ver con, por lxs de nosotrxs que estamos metidxs en las instituciones…[suspira] ¿Cómo debo decirlo? La corrupción y ruptura que llega—como ya mencionaste—a través del hecho de que todxs estamos viviendo con las consecuencias del colonialismo. Es estructuralmente, está incorporado en esas instituciones. En cada una, diría yo. Y, por lo menos en las grandes, como mi universidad, o bien como Berkeley de que hablamos anteriormente—no es una opción para la mayoria de nosotrxs, simplemente acabar con esas instituciones y buscar nuestro propio camino. Nos haría daño económicamente, nos podría hacer daño en otros sentidos también.  Entonces, ¿qué piensas, para cerrar, de cómo seguir trabajando con los sistemas defectuosos que hemos heredado, mientras nos aferramos a las ideas radicales que puede que tengamos, sobre como podríamos realmente cambiar las cosas? Aunque nos veamos más o menos obligadxs  --pues, muchxs de nosotrxs-- a quedarnos dentro del sistema existente, que incorpora valores que no necesariamente compartamos. ¿Cómo manejamos eso? ¿Tienes algunas ideas sobre eso?

PJ Flores: ¡Sí! Bueno, diría que nunca espero que ningun trabajo que tengo bajo del Sistema va a llevar a la liberación de mi pueblo. De ninguna manera. Aprecio mucho las maneras en que he estado trabajando con el OCEJ para investigar problemas de justicia medioambiental, para dar las herramientas a lxs miembros de las comunidades. Pero me quedo activa en el voluntarismo con las organizaciones de base, porque me defino sobre todo con el trabajo no pagado que hago. Entonces grupos como el Colectivo Tonantzín, donde trabajamos juntxs a luchar con lxs jornalerxs y trabajadorxs domésticxs contra el robo de sueldos, y para construir algún poder organizador de la economía trabajadora clandestina, ¿no? y luego con grupos como Protect Puvungna, trabajando aquí con los pueblos Indígenas Ajacchemen y Tongva, para defender los pueblos ancestrales y sitios sagrados. Eso es el trabajo con que más me identifico, porque me siento como nos permite imaginar a nuevos mundos en una manera diferente. Así que, creo que es importante tener algo fuera de lo que es tu carrera, que te permite pensar de otra manera, imaginar algo más allá de lo en que tenemos que meternos todos los días.

Y creo que una gran parte de eso también es reconocer lo que tú, únicamente, pones sobre la mesa, o sea, si por ejemplo, si tú eres unx codificadorx, y sabes muy bien como hacer los sitios web, puedes propagar información en las redes sociales. Es que todxs tenemos un talento que contribuir. Se trata de buscar cómo incorporarlo en la lucha de subvertir los sistemas que oprimen a la gente.

En fin, yo siempre pienso en como hay unxs de nosotrxs, como yo misma, que, pues, nací en este país, tengo título universitário, y asi estoy permitida a alcanzar ciertas posiciones dentro de las instituciones, ¿no? Pero luego hay otra parte de nuestra comunidad sin ninguna posibilidad de lograr eso. Podría ser por estatus migratorio. Podría ser cuestion de raza, porque la discriminación laboral es un gran factor. Podría tratar de problemas de la salud mental o descapacidades, que impiden el trabajo dentro del sistema capitalista en una semana de trabajo de 40 horas. Siempre va a haber un grupo de personas que no está permitido a acceder a esas instituciones. Y es por esas personas que quiero luchar: las personas como mi hermano, que está encarcelado, o las personas sin techo, ¿sabes? Las personas con adicciones y problemas de salud mental. Ellxs son lxs que siempre van a estar excluidxs de una sistema que no lxs valora, y es por ellxs que tenemos que luchar lo más duro, porque ellxs tienes las soluciones. Si luchamos por la gente más vulnerable, serviríamos a todxs lxs demás en este mundo porque, en fin, todxs tenemos necesidades muy parecidas a las suyas. Entonces creo que este reconocimiento es lo que me da ánimos de seguir luchando, para utilizar cualquier talento que tenga, cualquier información que tenga para contribuir, para subvertir mientras me muevo adentro. Entonces – ¡hazte espía! [ambas se rien] ¡Hazte chivato! Utiliza cualquier cosa que puedas y échale hacia la gente que más lo necesita. O sea, pienso que eso es lo que yo digo a la gente.

ELG: ¡Guau! Pues, es un gran mensaje con que concluir, ya no voy a hablar mucho más porque quiero que ese mensaje resuene más allá del fin de la entrevista. ¡Hazte espía! ¡la subversión! -- Mi mamá solía decir, “Subversión a través de la amabilidad.”

PJ Flores: [se rie] Sabes, eso he tenido que practicar unas cuantas veces. Sé gritar, y sé ser amable. Ambos son útiles.

ELG: Es verdad, es verdad. Ay, qué bueno. Muchas gracias, Patricia. Fue una hermosísima entrevista, y ¡tanta sabaduría de un corazón tan jóven! Yo predigo grandes cosas para tí, y estaré orgullosa y felíz de encontrarme dentro de tu órbita durante el mayor tiempo posible.

PJ Flores: Pues gracias. Eso significa mucho para mí.

ELG: Sí. Muchas gracias por compartir tu perspectiva aquí. Y bueno, ¡terminemos aquí!

Patricia abarca tantos temas interesantes en que no hemos podido entrar más plenamente aquí: lxs Brown Berets, el papel poco conocido del Partido Panteras Negras en desarrollar las políticas de la salud pública en los Estados Unidos, cómo las tierras envenenadas por el plomo corresponden a las comunidades de bajos recursos, la importancia de la subversión (así como unos cuantos consejitos sobre cómo practicarla), y, quizás más céntricamente, los modos en que los elementos sociales, musicales, espirituales, y póliticos de la vida se trenzan y se tejen juntos inextricablemente.

Hemos proporcionado unos enlaces para más lectura y exploración en la Bibliografía de Investigación para este episodio. Esperamos que ustedes puedan aprovecharse para seguir algunos de las pistas allá sugeridas, las que nos faltó tiempo para seguir hoy.

Would you like to know more?

On our website at siyofuera.org, you can find complete transcripts in both languages of every interview, our Blog about the issues of history, culture, and politics that come up around every song, links for listeners who might want to pursue a theme further, and some very cool imagery. You’ll find playlists of all the songs from all the interviews to date, and our special Staff-curated playlist as well.

We invite your comments or questions! Contact us at our website or participate in the Si Yo Fuera conversation on social media. We’re out there on FaceBook and Instagram. And then there’s just plain old word of mouth. If you like our show, do please tell your friends to give it a listen. And do please subscribe, on any of the major podcast platforms. We’ll bring a new interview for you, every two weeks on Friday mornings.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, and Wesley McClintock are our sound engineers; Zoë Broussard and Laura Díaz hold down the marketing; David Castañeda is Music Researcher; Jen Orenstein translates interviews to and from Spanish; Deyaneira García and Alex Dolven make production possible. We are a not-for-profit venture, currently and gratefully funded by the John Paul Simon Guggenheim Foundation, UCLA’s Faculty Grants Program, and the Herb Alpert School of Music.

For now, and until the next interview—keep listening to one another!

I’m Elisabeth Le Guin, and this is, “Si yo fuera una canción -- If I were a song…”

English

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND LINKS

ORANGE COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE (OCEJ) – PATRICIA’S WORKPLACE

https://www.ocej.org/

URBAN LEAD CONTAMINATION & ITS REMEDIATION

http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/document/huddoc?id=DOC_12460.pdf

http://urban-homesteading.org/remediating-lead-in-the-soil/

THE BLACK PANTHERS & PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIVISM

Morabia, Alfredo. “Unveiling the Black Panther Party Legacy to Public Health.” US National

Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. (2016)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5024399/

Johnson, Annysa. “Milwaukee Black Panthers launch lead awareness campaign.” Milwaukee

Journal Sentinel, Nov 3, 2018

https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/2018/11/03/milwaukee-black-panthers-plan-lead-

awareness-campaign-hop-protest/1872239002/

____________________________________________________________________

CRUISING ON BRISTOL STREET IN SANTA ANA

Wikipedia “Lowrider” (en español) https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lowrider

“Cruising Makes a Comeback,” LA Times 2001

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2001-jun-10-me-8728-story.html

https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/no-easter-night-car-cruising-in-santa-ana-this-year-police-warn/2343142/ (2020, COVID related)

A Police guide from 2005 about how to control the “problem of cruising”

https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.399.9266&rep=rep1&type=pdf

______________________________________________________________________________

THE 5 PER CENT NATION (NATION OF GODS AND EARTHS (NGE/NOGE))

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five-Percent_Nation

Swedenburg, Ted. “Islam in the Mix: Lessons of the Five Percent” -- a paper given in 1996 at the Univ. of

Arkansas

https://web.archive.org/web/20110814081607/http://comp.uark.edu/~tsweden/5per.html

https://humanities.wustl.edu/news/enter-five-percent-how-wu-tang-clan’s-debut-album-maps-

complex-doctrine-five-percent-nation

______________________________________________________________________

Español

BIBLIOGRAFÍA y ENLACES


ORANGE COUNTY ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE (OCEJ) – PATRICIA’S WORKPLACE

https://www.ocej.org/

URBAN LEAD CONTAMINATION & ITS REMEDIATION

http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/document/huddoc?id=DOC_12460.pdf

http://urban-homesteading.org/remediating-lead-in-the-soil/

THE BLACK PANTHERS & PUBLIC HEALTH ACTIVISM

Morabia, Alfredo. “Unveiling the Black Panther Party Legacy to Public Health.” US National

Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. (2016)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5024399/

Johnson, Annysa. “Milwaukee Black Panthers launch lead awareness campaign.” Milwaukee

Journal Sentinel, Nov 3, 2018

https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/2018/11/03/milwaukee-black-panthers-plan-lead-

awareness-campaign-hop-protest/1872239002/

____________________________________________________________________

CRUISING ON BRISTOL STREET IN SANTA ANA

Wikipedia “Lowrider” (en español) https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lowrider

“Cruising Makes a Comeback,” LA Times 2001

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2001-jun-10-me-8728-story.html

https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/no-easter-night-car-cruising-in-santa-ana-this-year-police-warn/2343142/ (2020, COVID related)

A Police guide from 2005 about how to control the “problem of cruising”

https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.399.9266&rep=rep1&type=pdf

______________________________________________________________________________

THE 5 PER CENT NATION (NATION OF GODS AND EARTHS (NGE/NOGE))

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five-Percent_Nation

Swedenburg, Ted. “Islam in the Mix: Lessons of the Five Percent” -- a paper given in 1996 at the Univ. of

Arkansas

https://web.archive.org/web/20110814081607/http://comp.uark.edu/~tsweden/5per.html

https://humanities.wustl.edu/news/enter-five-percent-how-wu-tang-clan’s-debut-album-maps-

complex-doctrine-five-percent-nation

______________________________________________________________________

September - Earth, Wind, and Fire

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

Do you remember, 21st night of September?
Love was changing the mind of pretenders


While chasing the clouds away
Our hearts were ringing
In the key that our souls were singing
As we danced in the night
Remember
How the stars stole the night away, oh yeah

Hey, hey, hey
Ba-dee-ya, say, do you remember?
Ba-dee-ya, dancing in September
Ba-dee-ya, never was a cloudy day

Ba-du, ba-du, ba-du, ba-du

Ba-du, ba-du, ba-du, ba-du
Ba-du, ba-du, ba-du-da, yeah

My thoughts are with you

Holding hands with your heart to see you


Only blue talk and love
Remember
How we knew love was here to stay


Now December
Found the love we shared in September


Only blue talk and love
Remember
True love we share today

Hey, hey, hey
Ba-dee-ya, say, do you remember?
Ba-dee-ya, dancing in September
Ba-dee-ya, never was a cloudy day
There was a
Ba-dee-ya, say, do you remember?
Ba-dee-ya, dancing in September
Ba-dee-ya, golden dreams were shiny days

The bell was ringing, oh, oh
Our souls was singing
Do you remember, never a cloudy day, yow

There was a
Ba-dee-ya, say, do you remember?
Ba-dee-ya, dancing in September
Ba-dee-ya, never was a cloudy day
There was a

Ba-dee-ya, say, do you remember?
Ba-dee-ya, dancing in September
Ba-dee-ya, golden dreams were shiny days

Ba-dee-ya, dee-ya, dee-ya
Ba-dee-ya, dee-ya, dee-ya
Ba-dee-ya, dee-ya, dee-ya, dee-ya
Ba-dee-ya, dee-ya, dee-ya
Ba-dee-ya, dee-ya, dee-ya
Ba-dee-ya, dee-ya, dee-ya, dee-ya


Traducción | Translation

¿Tú te acuerdas?

El amor estaba cambiando la mente de lxs fingidores

Mientras ahuyentaba las nubes

Nuestros corazones sonaban

En la clave en que nuestras almas cantaban

Mientras bailábamos en la noche

Recuerda

Como las estrellas se robaron la noche, o yea

Hey, hey, hey

Ba-di-ya, dime, ¿tú te acuerdas?

Ba-di-ya, bailando en septiembre

Ba-di-ya, nunca había un día nublado

Ba-du, ba-du, ba-du, ba-du

Ba-du, ba-du, ba-du, ba-du
Ba-du, ba-du, ba-du-da, yeah

Mis pensamientos están contigo

Agarrándose de las manos con tu corazón por verte

Tan solo habla azul y amor

Recuerda

Como sabíamos que el amor era aquí para siempre

Ahora diciembre

Encontró el amor que compartíamos en septiembre

Tan solo habla azul y amor

Recuerda

Amor verdadero que compartimos hoy

Hey, hey, hey

Ba-di-ya, dime, ¿tú te acuerdas?

Ba-di-ya, bailando en septiembre

Ba-di-ya, nunca había un día nublado

Había un

Ba-di-ya, dime, ¿tú te acuerdas?

Ba-di-ya, bailando en septiembre

Ba-di-ya, sueños dorados eran días brillantes

La campana sonaba, oh, oh

Nuestras almas cantaban

Te acuerdas, nunca un día nublado, yow

Había un

Ba-di-ya, dime, ¿tú te acuerdas?

Ba-di-ya, bailando en septiembre

Ba-di-ya, nunca había un día nublado

Había un

Ba-di-ya, dime, ¿tú te acuerdas?

Ba-di-ya, bailando en septiembre

Ba-di-ya, sueños dorados eran días brillantes

Ba-di-ya, di-ya, di-ya
Ba-di-ya, di-ya, di-ya
Ba-di-ya, di-ya, di-ya, di-ya
Ba-di-ya, di-ya, di-ya
Ba-di-ya, di-ya, di-ya
Ba-di-ya, di-ya, di-ya, di-ya


Robbin' Hood Theory - Gang Starr

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

[Intro]
Guru: Peace Brother Elijah
Elijah Shabazz: Hey peace Guru, how you doing?
Guru: I'm maintaining, just been thinking though man
About the situation for today's youth man, the seeds man
What's your opinion on that?
Elijah Shabazz: Mmm that's strange I was thinkin the same thing
Something I read in the holy Qur'an how it says
"Has thou seen him who belies religion?
That is one who is rough, to the orphan."
And no matter what we say our religion is
Whether it's Islam, Christianity, Juddaism, Buddha-ism, Old School-ism or New School-ism
If we're not schooling the youth WITH wisdom
Then the sins of the father will visit the children
And that's not keepin it real...
That's keeping it - *WRONG*


Now that we’re getting somewhere, you know we got to give back

For the youth of the future no doubt that’s right and exact
Squeeze the juice out, of all the suckers with power
And pour some back out, so as to water the flowers
This world is ours, that's why the demons are leery
It's our inheritance; this is my Robin Hood Theory... Robin Hood Theory


I seek sun, deceive non, for each one must teach one

At least one must flow and show the structure of freedom

It’s me, Dunn, cause petty things we don’t need ‘em

Let’s focus to create something great, for all that sees them

They innocent, they know not what they face
While politicians save face genius minds lay to waste


If I wasn't kickin rhymes I'd be kickin down doors
Creatin social change and defendin the poor


The God's always been militant, and ready for war

We’re gonna snatch up the ringleaders, send em home in they drawers
But first where's the safe at? Let's make em show us
And tell em hurry up, give up the loot that they owe us
We bringin it back, around the way to our peeps

Cause times are way too deep, we know the Code of the Streets

Meet your defeat; this is my Robin Hood Theory... my Robin Hood Theory


I floss my rhymes like dentals, my mental's presidential
From the wild ghetto districts to the plush residential
Essential, would be the message that I send you
I meant to, elevate at every venue
Pops told me to pursue what is true, and nothing other
And nowadays I pave the way for troops of my young brothers

Necessary by all means, sort of like Malcolm

Before it's too late; I create, the best outcome

So I take this opportunity, yes to ruin the
Devilish forces fucking up my black community
And we ain't doing no more interviews
Til we get paid out the frame, like motherfucking Donahue
We're taking over radio, and wack media


Cause systematically they getting greedier and greedier
Conquering turfs with my ill organization


Takin out the man while we scan the information
You wanna rhyme you best await son
You can't even come near, if you ain't got our share
You front on us this year, consider yourself blown out of here
Yeah... by my Robin Hood Theory

 


Squeeze the juice out, of all the suckers with power
And pour some back out, so as to water the flowers
This world is ours, that's why the demons are leery
It's our inheritance; this is my Robin Hood Theory

 

God is Universal, he is the Ruler Universal

For those who can’t follow that spells GURU

 

When in my circle
I see all sides of my culture...
Design my thoughts like a sculpture


And chumps they wanna get with me cause I'm another entity
I'm sent to be, leadin the army of the century
Mention me, and snakes will retreat, eventually...
... due to my Robin Hood Theory

Now that we’re gettin somewhere, you know we have to give back

For the youth is the future no doubt that’s right and exact
Squeeze the juice out, of all the suckers with power
And pour some back out, so as to water the flowers
This world is ours, that's why the demons are leery
It's our inheritance; this is my Robin Hood Theory



Traducción | Translation

[Intro]

Guru: Paz, hermano Elijah


Elijah Shabazz: Hola, paz, Guru, ¿como te va?


Guru: Ahí sigo, pero he estado pensando, hombre, 

en la situación para lxs jóvenes de hóy, hombre, las semillas, hombre. 

¿Qué opinas sobre eso?

Elijah Shabazz: Mmm, qué raro, estaba pensando en lo mismo. Algo que leí en el Corán sagrado que dice:

 

“¿Has visto a él que desmiente la religión? Ese es rudo, al huérfano”

Y no importa que digamos que es nuestra religión, sea el islam, la cristiandad, el judaísmo, budismo, vieja-escuelismo, o nueva-escuelismo, 

si no estamos enseñando a lxs jóvenes con sabiduría, 

pues los pecados del padre visitarán a lxs niñxs, 

y eso no eso no está bien… 

eso sí está mal.



Ahora que vayamos por buen camino, sabes que tenemos que contribuir

Para lxs jóvenes del futuro no cabe duda de que eso es cierto y exacto

Exprima el jugo, de todxs lxs mamones en poder

Y vierta un poco para regar las flores

Este mundo es nuestro, es por eso que lxs demonios sean recelosxs

Es nuestra herencia, esto es mi teoría de Robin Hood… teoría de Robin Hood



Busco el sol, no le engaño a nadie, porque cada unx tiene que enseñar a unx

Al menos unx debe fluir y enseñar la estructura de la libertad

Soy yo, Dunn, porque las cosas mezquinas, no las necesitamos

Vamos a enfocarnos en crear algo excelente para todxs que lo vea


Son inocentes, no saben a qué enfrentan

Mientras lxs políticos se salvan las apariencias mentes brillantes se echan a perder

Si no estuviera haciendo rimas estaría rompiendo puertas

Creando cambios sociales y defendiendo a lxs pobres

Lxs dioses siempre han estado militantes y listxs para la guerra

Vamos a agarrar lxs cabecillas

Y mandarlxs pa casa en calzones

Pero primero, ¿dónde está la caja fuerte? Vamos a obligarles a enseñarnos

Y dígales que se apurren, a darnos la plata que nos deben

La vamos a devolver a nuestra gente


Porque los tiempos están muy hondos, sabemos el código de las calles

Encuentra tu derrota, esto es mi teoría de Robin Hood… mi teoría de Robin Hood


Mi rima es fina como hilo dental, mi estado mental es presidencial

De los barrios salvajes a las zonas residenciales de lujo

Esencial, sería el mensaje que te envío


Quería elevar en cada lugar

Mi papá me dijo que hay que seguir lo que es verdad, y nada más

Y hoy en día abro camino para las tropas

De mis hermanos jóvenes

Necesario por todo medio, un poco como Malcolm


Antes de que sea demasiado tarde, yo creo,

El mejor resultado

Entonces aprovecho de esta oportunidad, sí de arruinar las fuerzas diabólicas que joden con mi comunidad Negra

Y no haremos más entrevistas

Hasta que nos paguen muy bien

Como el pinche Donahue

Estamos tomando control del radio, y los medios locos

Porque sistemáticamente se están poniendo cada vez más avariciosxs

Conquistando territorios con mi organización chida

Eliminando las autoridades mientras escaneamos la información

Quieres rimar, es mejor que te esperes mijo

No puedes ni acercarte si no tienes nuestra porción debida

Si nos engañas este año, te echaremos de aquí

Sí… con mi teoría de Robin Hood



Exprima el jugo, de todxs lxs mamones en poder

Y vierta un poco para regar las flores

Este mundo es nuestro, es por eso que lxs demonios sean recelosxs

Es nuestra herencia, esto es mi teoría de Robin Hood… teoría de Robin Hood



Dios es universal, es el soberano universal

Por los que nos pueden seguir, eso quiere decir GURU(1) 

Desde mi círculo veo todos los lados de mi cultura…

Diseña mis pensamientos como sagrada escritura 

Y lxs tontxs quieren juntarse a mí porque soy otra entidad

Enviado a estar, liderando el ejercito del siglo

Me menciona y las serpientes huyen eventualmente

…Por mi teoría de Robin Hood


Ahora que vayamos por buen camino, sabes que tenemos que contribuir

Para lxs jóvenes del futuro no cabe duda de que eso es cierto y exacto

Exprima el jugo, de todxs lxs mamones en poder

Y vierta un poco para regar las flores

Este mundo es nuestro, es por eso que lxs demonios sean recelosxs

Es nuestra herencia, esto es mi teoría de Robin Hood… teoría de Robin Hood


  1. en inglés las primeras letras de cada palabra en la frase “God is Universal...Ruler Universal” forman la palabra GURU, nombre del MC.

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language
Traducción | Translation