Episodio / Episode #
12
August 27, 2021

Marlha Sánchez

English

Español

English

Greetings and welcome to the latest episode of “Si yo fuera una canción”  -- “If I Were a Song.” We are a community-based podcast and radio show, in which people of Santa Ana, California, tell us in their own words about the music that means the most to them.

ELG: I am Elisabeth Le Guin, your program host, and Director of this project.

This project is based on my conviction that we people in the modern world need to learn to listen to one another; and that music, and all it brings us, is the perfect place to begin.

DAVID: My name is David Castañeda, music researcher here for the SYFUC podcast. I am so happy to be a part of this project, using my scholarly training and my performance experience to bring you the stories, music, and lived experiences of those living right here in Santa Ana.

Like a number of our interviewees, Marlha mentions El Centro Cultural de México in the course of our conversation. I’ve talked about Centro before, but for listeners who have joined us more recently, I’ll take a moment here to introduce it again. Centro has been a Santa Ana institution for almost 25 years.

It hosts free or low-cost classes and events in traditional Mexican arts and culture, and it also has served as a hub for community-based activism on behalf of immigrants, workers, and the undocumented.

Centro’s physical location has been closed for a year and a half due to the pandemic, but its spirit has remained strong. Preparations are under way to re-open as I record these words.

ELG: All right. Welcome, Marlha! So delighted that you've agreed to do an interview with us, and I'm really excited about the music you've chosen, and just about having this conversation and getting to know you a little bit better through the conversation. So…just tell us your name and what you'd like people to know about yourself in a public context, and how it is that you are in Santa Ana. What brought you here? What keeps you here?

Marlha: Yeah, sure. My name is Marlha Sánchez and I am a mom of two really amazing LGBTQ kids. And what brings me and brought me to Santa Ana was my grandparents. They were farm workers in central California and really wanted a different life for their kids. And so they moved here, and our family stayed here. My uncles and my tías live here, my parents lived here, my mom's sisters kind of moved here. And we just kind of set down roots. And actually [I] spent a lot of time trying to get out of here because I felt like there wasn't a lot of folks that had the same values or vision of what life should be like. And I moved away shortly to Napa to go to college. And then I came back and found...and found my people!

ELG: Huh. Had something changed in Santa Ana during the time that you were away, do you think?

Marlha: No. In fact, it's really funny because I had had friends tell me about El Centro, and I could never find it before I moved. And I was like, "Oh, that's a shame. You know, I can never find these people!" And then when I moved away, my brother started going to punk shows at El Centro.

And I still didn't find it for a few years after I came back. But when I did, I think it was just the right time. I had kids by then and...it was just a good moment for us to find the space, we really needed it at that time. So it was, I think it was really just perfect, divine timing. [both laugh]

ELG: So interesting. Just a couple of questions. You said your grandparents moved here. Is that correct? Did I understand--

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: And approximately when would that have been?

Marlha: It was in the early nineteen fifties.

ELG: Wow.

Marlha: So like 1951, I think they bought this house that we live in now in like, '52 or '53.

ELG: Yeah, I...Yeah, I'm trying to imagine Santa Ana in the early 50s. I know it was very different from what it is now.

Marlha: Yeah. They tell me it was very, very different. Even when I was little in the early 80s in this neighborhood, it was very different from what it is today.

ELG: Yeah, I hear that a lot. I am often

told by people that the neighborhood that I live in, which is kind of in the southern part of the city, that it was actually really quite a dangerous area, or that's that's how they put it. And I certainly don't feel that now. So obviously, they're have been big, big changes. Yeah. And there continue to be changes, of course.

Marlha: Yeah. Actually, my parents live kind of near you. That's where I grew up, is more over there towards Main and Edinger. And I remember like, drive-bys and like friends, just so many people died in the nineties, you know, in the neighborhood.

ELG: Wow. Wow.

Marlha: It's very different.

ELG: Yeah, it is very different. Wow. That's something... Another thing that I wanted to ask you to go into just a tiny bit more was, you, as I understood it, you said you were you were kind of looking for something here in Santa Ana and not finding it, and so that you felt that you had to leave. And you did leave for a while. Can you tell us a little bit more about what it was you were looking for?

Marlha: Yeah, I'm not even sure I really knew at the time! [laughs]

ELG: Uh-huh.

Marlha: I just... What I knew was that I didn't fit in anywhere. Even in my own family I felt like I didn't fit in, like people didn't really understand how my brain worked, or like my feelings were so...so much and I knew that there was so much more to life and so many things seemed wrong to me, that I think that at that time, the way that I could identify it was kind of more like... How hippies were. You know?

ELG: Ah-hah.

Marlha: It was like, "I want to live more free. I want to be more in connection to the Earth." And [I] didn't have a lot of reference points for what that meant for me, from where I come from, because I had always seen it through a Eurocentric lens, where it's like... Where it's like this  hippie movement or like "New Age." And I didn't have a clear understanding of what that meant for for me, in my family, and what our roots were in that kind of way of life.

ELG: Yes.

Marlha: So I was looking for something outside of myself in my community; and then I had to come back to my community to find my roots and my...you know, that that thing that I couldn't name at that time. Because I think I wouldn’t call it any of those things, now. [laughs]

ELG: Right, right. And, you know, I'm not sure it's a great idea to even give it a name because it's like a like a complex of values, right? I actually... I suspect, given the the music that you've chosen for this interview, that we're going to get a little closer to what that complex is, just kind of through talking about the songs that you chose.

Marlha: Mm-hm.

ELG: So tell us a little bit about the first song that you chose and why you chose it, and maybe, you know, like it when it came into your life and how it came into your life.

Marlha: Sure, sure. The first song that I picked was "Vengo" by Ana Tijoux, which... I don't remember exactly when it came into my life, I know it was several years ago. And, umm... what was the other question?

ELG: Maybe just a few words about why you chose it.

Marlha: Oh, okay. Yes. I chose it partially because of the way the music mixes. So part of it for me is very much this, like, rap. Like that's how I, that's the music I grew up with in my neighborhood. And my family was, you know, hip hop and rap was like all we listened to. So that for me is very much like the side of my family that is from the United States. My dad is Chicano, so he's also, like, kind of in the same vein of music. We have like similar tastes. My mom is an immigrant from Veracruz. And so I also really liked that there was, like, this kind of like Indigenous and, like, Mesoamerican sound mixed in with the rap.

ELG: Yeah... Yeah, yeah, I --

Marlha: And then the words are just, like, so on point.

ELG: It's amazing! It's como un chorro de palabras, you know, it's like this stream of words that come out of that song. It's... I mean that's true of a lot of hip hop, of course.

Marlha: Yeah. [both laugh]

ELG: But there's something about the way she delivers those words. That is... I mean, I, I totally agree with you. It's really compelling.

Marlha: Mm-hm.

ELG: So, yeah. Lots of words. And what are the things that she says in this song, what are the things that she tells us that, you know, really like drew your attention early on, when you were first hearing this song?

Marlha: I just felt like a lot of, the way that she delivers it and what she's saying is so raw, and like powerful and vulnerable at the same time. Which is exactly how I feel. I really identify with that, like wanting to come and looking for answers. Coming in with this knowing that is coming from somewhere else. It's coming from, you know, our ancestors. It's coming from our lineages that came before us. And trying to reimagine the world, you know? Seeing that things are not quite right, and that there's a different way to go, to go through it. And bringing art into it, you know? "Vengo con la palabra." I write a lot, and so for me, poetry -- and just any any form of the written word is really incredible and powerful, and her voice in the music and the lyrics are just like... They give me chills.

ELG: Mm hmm. Mm hmm. Me too. Me too. Yeah, I... I was, you know, listening to it again this morning and I was just really... Really struck by the urgency of it. I think I think that's the word I want. I mean, a lot of hip hop is urgent, I think. But sometimes I feel like with hip hop, the urgency crosses over into aggression. And there's some very good reasons for that. But in this case, she doesn't. That's not where she goes with her urgency. So it's it's more just... Like very pure. I don't know.

Marlha: I find it like a... Very sacred. It's like very sacred, this song. Like it's almost like a prayer.

ELG: Yes! Yes, you're right. It, there's… A real prayer, that's really coming out of the heart, you know, there's going to be urgency there! Because you really want--.

Marlha: Mm-hm!

ELG: Why don't we listen to the song:

MUSIC CLIP # 1

Ana Tijoux, “Vengo

Marlha: Made me cry. [laughs]

ELG: Awwww. Cool. [both laugh] I mean, not that I want you to cry, but...

Marlha: It's a good cry. [laughs]

ELG: Uh-huh. What...what grabbed your heart in that way, this time around?

Marlha: I feel like she opens it so powerfully! "Vengo en busco de respuestas." I feel like... like, I came into this life with a certain way of feeling and thinking and wanting to question. That's one part of it, you know, wanting to find a different way. But then there's a part to where she's talking about the histories of our ancestors that aren't told, y el orgullo indio, and just that disconnection from...from my heritage, from my lineage... My mom's mom, who's from Veracruz -- my mom is from Veracruz -- she's the last native speaker of Nahuatl in our family. And we have no information about, you know, our family's native history. And same thing on my dad's side, you know, my dad's family has been in the United States prior to it being the United States.

And we have lots of rumors, you know, that this relative was Apache, or we have Apache [heritage], or we're part Navajo. But we don't have any real connections to those communities and we have lots of lost... Lost knowledge, I feel like, in so many ways, and not even just native, but just with my mom being an immigrant.

When she came to this country, she really wanted to give herself and her family and her kids a better life, and so she tells me, like, "You know, I really wanted to name you Xochitl, but I just felt like that would make your life so much harder. So we decided to name you Marlha 'cos it's easier to pronounce." You know?

ELG: Yeah.

Marlha: And so there's so much culture that was lost because of religion, religious changes, or just trying to be more "American" and fit in. And I feel such a strong connection to more ancestral ways and more traditional ways, and so it feels like a loss.

ELG: Yeah, yeah. Well, yeah, there's plenty of reason to cry about that... You know, but what's so striking here is that Ana Tijoux is not crying. She is marching.

Marlha: Mm-hm.

ELG: I mean, this song it has...the beat is just pretty much exactly, I think, the speed and the swing and the feel that you'd have if you were kind of marching along, you know, if you were walking a long way, like maybe a thousand miles. You know, you'd want to have a rhythm to your walk to just keep you going. And that's the rhythm I hear in this song, is it's just marching forward.

Marlha: Absolutely.

ELG: You know, when she says "Vengo," it's like, "I'm coming!"

Marlha: Mm-hm. And we're bringing it. [both laugh] We're bringing all the ancestors. We're bringing all the elements.

ELG: Yeah!

Marlha: And we're building something. I feel like it is so, such a hopeful song. Like it does give you a sense of strength and, like, purpose.

ELG: Yeah. You know, and...a pesar de todo, you know, despite all these losses that you just mentioned, the... you know, beyond heartbreaking, what's been lost, what's been destroyed. I think about this a lot from my positioning just as a historian, and... The further you get into working with the histories of peoples who, you know, didn't necessarily write books of their own histories. They kept their histories orally or through practices that were handed down through generations, you know, and that stuff has been kind of decimated in a lot of cases. A lot of... Emigration is a big part of that. And just, you know, various genocides are a big part of that.

Marlha: Mm-hm.

ELG: And so, you know, I live in that space of grief, I think I recognize it. It's -- my positioning is a little different than yours, but I think there's a relationship between these griefs, if you will. And, and yet! Here comes Ana Tijoux and all her... her tribe! I see it as just like this big group of dark haired women with high cheekbones, and they're just marching, and they're coming.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: And yeah, it's, it's... I agree it's super hopeful. And that's the trick, isn't it, to pull hopefulness out of a past that has been kind of chopped up and messed with and oppressed and edited...

_____________

INSERT #1

NOTE: this is not a translation but discusses the same themes in each language.

David: Ok, Elisabeth, so: "Vengo" by Ana Tijoux. Wow, there's so much here, there's so much that it means to so many different people, and it's such an iconic song for so many different reasons.

ELG: You know, I think Marlha actually is so eloquent about this. What I can tell you is that in the immigrant communities and the activist communities here in Santa Ana that I have been a part of for about 10 years, this song and the whole album that it comes from (the song "Vengo" is the title song of the album "Vengo") -- that they're iconic, they're like, the whole thing is a kind of monument to a particular consciousness among immigrant folk who are trying to find a way to exist in the United States of America, [one] that makes sense, that works, and there is something more than just buying in to capitalism. And Anita Tijoux's work has just really, it just goes right to the heart of that for so many people that I know. So. So, Marla, is she she's actually actually speaking very eloquently for a lot of people about this song. She has numerous albums. And in all of them, she is overtly political. And she has made her reputation as a, quote unquote, "political" artist, "political" singer, rapper... She does a beautiful job of it. She says the thing, and she manages to make that more than just merely a lecture. And I'm hesitating here because there's another side to it, I think, that doesn't get talked about as much, and I think it's a very interesting side. And that is that she is also a commercial artist, a very successful one. Her work is, you know, not only poetically beautiful and musically interesting, it's also very highly polished and beautifully produced. And that just -- that doesn't come out of a garage studio! I don't think that Ana Tijoux at any point in her life has been one of the oppressed peoples that she speaks on behalf of.

David: Mm.

ELG: And that raises a lot of interesting questions. She's too astute and too smart to just, you know, take the podium and try to speak for other people. She's not doing that. She's making art that speaks to people who are struggling in this world. And she does it very deftly and very beautifully. But I cannot help feeling that there is another step that is not taken here. And that is the step of... If liberation is what you're about, if liberation is what you want your life and your work to be about, there's going to come this moment where you have to step away from the mic and you have to get down from the podium and you hand that mic or that podium or that guitar or that recording studio to the people who need the liberation.

David: Mm hmm.

ELG: And that's a very interesting moment! Ana Tijoux's work as we know it is, it's not about that. She's doing important work in the world with her art. But I just wanted to say that the full picture of liberation involves this other piece, where we who enjoy these platforms and these microphones in society, who have the advantage to be able to produce a podcast like this one, where we need to fold our hands and step back and say, "Here! Here's the mic. Tell us in your own words, what it is you need, and what and how this world needs to be different."

_____________

Marlha: Yeah...[pauses] -- Yeah,  I feel so much that for me, there's been this call, like this deep -- and I think she even says it in the song -- like this urgency to learn the histories, because we don't want to repeat that. We want to see the world in a different way, we want to create the world in a different way. Like that's for me, that's the call. And that's, I think, what I was looking for when I left Santa Ana and I was trying to find this thing. It was like, "I want to -- I want the world to be different."

ELG: Yeah.

Marlha: And how do we do that, and who's doing that?

ELG: Yeah. Yeah. And so... How are you doing that? Sort of fast forward to the present for a moment here. How has your path reflected this, this march, this, you know, the coming, that Tijoux speaks of?

Marlha: I think a lot of it has to do with the work that I'm doing now with the school, with Unidos Home-school Cooperative. And really making sure that those things that I wasn't taught in school, that my kids and these other kids who are doing school with us are learning from the beginning.

That we're teaching them about different types of music from different parts of all of Turtle Island, like Mesoamerica and South America, and all of it!

And really recognizing the different tribes, the different languages, the different traditions, and creating relationships here where we are now with the tribes that are the original caretakers of these lands, the Ajacchemen and the Tongva. We go and we spend time with them in their struggles and in their celebrations.

And we have friendships that we're building. Just to create community. I think community is a big part of it.

And I think that's why I've been drawn to the spaces I've been drawn to, because there's a similarity in values and there's this, like, cohesiveness in the community sense of, it's not just the nuclear family that's taking care of their own little group, but there's this larger community and we're all looking out for each other.

ELG: And bringing that forward, sort of front and center in an educational enterprise. I mean -- do the kids in your cooperative, do they feel like they're going to school, in any sense that, you know, that I might recognize? [both laugh]

Marlha: It's very different. Before the pandemic, we were in our home. So it was like, we didn't really have a classroom. We would do class in the front yard or the backyard and we would make lunch together in the kitchen.

ELG: Mm hmm.

Marlha: And there's kind of a loose rhythm. But we also try to be super flexible. You know, and really deal with like, you know -- we're dealing with little kids. So sometimes there's conflict and we will stop everything. We will stop a lesson to deal with the conflict as a group, you know.

ELG: Yeah. Yeah. How different is that, right there!

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: Yeah. So that part of what's front and center, it sounds like, is just the health of the collective, of the community, in any given moment, that that's more important than some...program.

Marlha: Absolutely. [chuckles]

ELG: Yes. I'm just standing here trying to imagine a world in which, if that one principle were operating, you know, in our governance systems right now, in any consistent way -- I think we have moments of it, but only moments, and they're pretty fleeting, you know, just -- How would things look? I can't quite complete that thought experiment because I know they [would look] different.

ELG: -- Well, I want to make sure that I get some of the links that you have to your school that are public, and suitable for the public to look at. I want to make sure that we publish them on our website, when we release your episode we'll coordinate that. So people can check out a little bit more in depth what it is you're up to. It's very exciting. I mean, you know, OK, you hear this a lot, but it's merely true: that children are the future.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: If you're going to... If you're going to change things, it's a really good place to start!

Marlha: Yeah. [laughs] For sure. Yeah, that's exactly how I see it.

ELG: Yep. Well, so that makes a great pivot point to talking about your second song, I think, which is the song you chose to express or represent some of your hopes for the future.

And so, you chose Alicia Keys, "Authors of Forever," which... it came out only last year. It's quite a new song.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: And… shall we listen to it first and then talk?

Marlha: Yeah, yeah, let's do it.

ELG: Let's do it!

MUSIC CLIP # 2

Alicia Keys “Authors of Forever”

ELG: Tell me a little bit about when you would be likely to listen to this song.

Marlha: I like to listen to Alicia Keys all the time! In the shower, in the car... And this song in particular, I love the way her voice sounds, I... She's one of the artists that I will, like, always sing along to, because I just... Her words and the voice, the music are so beautiful. This is something that I would listen to when I'm feeling down... I feel like it's a it's a double. I listen to it when I want to cry, I listen to it when I want some strength. I want some hope --

ELG: Yeah.

Marlha: -- some peace, you know...

ELG: Isn't it funny how we -- I think this is really common, I know I do it -- how we think that crying and getting strength are somehow different from each other?

Marlha: Mmm. Yeah!

ELG: You know, maybe actually crying is a way to get in touch with some of our strength.

Marlha: Oh, I love that! I had not thought of it that way before.

ELG:  -- But you know how when you have a good cry about something, very often, at least, I come out of that feeling renewed.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: And...you know, maybe it's just catharsis, maybe just letting some stuff go, but sometimes you've got to let stuff go for the other stuff that moves us forward to come in.

Marlha: Yeah...

ELG: So, it seems to me those two functions, they kind of combine, you know. Yeah, so she keeps saying, "It's all right, it's all right."

Marlha: I feel like you nailed it! Like I hadn't really looked at it that way before, but I feel like that's so much of what this song embodies, right? Because it's talking about, like, the duality of being human. And like, we mess up. We, we... We hate, you know, we doubt, we... we're struggling. But, it's all right. We're going to get through it. You know, we still have to love hard, because we're only here you know, maybe once! [both laugh] Who knows?

ELG: This version for sure is only this one time.

Marlha: Yeah, exactly. [laughs]

ELG: Yeah….It's such a great pair with your first song. Because in the first song, she's coming, she's going to arrive, she's on her way, get ready, right? And in this song, it's kind of like, "We're all here. This is where we are." And it's maybe not going so great, some of the time, you know. But...but it's all right.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: It's like an invitation to continue, I guess.

Marlha: Yeah …to be gentle with each other. I feel like it's so easy for me, and I feel like for other people too, to get caught up in blaming other people for their circumstances, or blaming them for not doing what we would have done in their circumstances. And I feel like like in this song, she's like reminding us, like, we're all here with a set of unique experiences that make us who we are. And all of that is valid. And we're still able to bring such beauty and light into the world and again, like, recreate the world in the way we want to, and the way that feels safe and loving for us, while accepting others.

ELG: Yeah. And well, yeah, there's the hope for the future, of course. What is it-- it’s like the second or third line that she sings, and I'm going to misremember it. I don't have it written down in front of me. But about, kind of, loving and welcoming the spaces between us?

Marlha: Yeah. "We embrace the space between us, 'cos it's all right."

ELG: There we go. Thank you.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: Yeah. It, so... I did not know this song. So I've just been getting to know it over the last few days. And I had an interesting experience with it, which I want to very briefly tell you, which is I listened to the version you sent me, which is the version on Apple Music, and listened to it several times. And I thought, you know -- well, I thought all my musicologist thoughts about it, you know -- [both laugh] But it did strike me that in contrast with Anita Tijoux's song, this song, it goes at almost exactly the same rhythm. It's got the same kind of walking rhythm to it. And I thought, "That's really cool." That both these songs are kind of just walking forward. They're not in a hurry, but they're not stopping either. So that, they have that in common. But then this song is sooooo much more spacious. It... You know, she's not delivering a huge amount of text with this urgency, it doesn't have that urgency. It has more, kind of, open space in it somehow. And I began feeling almost a little bit as if that open space where a kind of an emptiness, and that led me down a path of thinking, you know, "Is she really believing what she's saying? Does she really think it's all right?" It's like. It seems like she's saying, singing it, from this really lonely place, like an acoustically lonely place. And I got all worried about that! [both laugh] -- So there's a resolution to this story. But before I tell you what my personal resolution was to my worry, I just wondered if you had any thoughts about that, you know, the spaciousness in this song.

Marlha: Yeah! I always kind of take it as, the silences, the unknown. You know, the question of, "Is it all right?" It's OK to sit in that. It's OK to not know. That doesn't mean that we stop... You know, I feel like a big part of all of this process of becoming is, a large part of it is being OK in those spaces, and being OK with not knowing what is really going to happen.

ELG: Oh, now you're making ME cry. Shoot. That's beautiful.

Marlha: I think, you know, for me, too, it's the part where the other voice comes in, and he's talking about, "If you find love, love like it's the first time, God only knows it will be the last time."

I feel like it's so, that is also part of it, too. Like we enter into relationships with people, and we want it to last forever, but really, we don't really know what turns any relationship is going to take, whether it's a friendship or a romantic partnership, and... I feel like I've gotten so stuck on needing to know, and needing to be able to define, you know, that I'm trying to learn to be OK with, "This love or this friendship is what it is, for right now." And we've just got to try to enjoy all of it, all of life, for this moment. Because, you know, it could end at any moment.

ELG: Right. And so you... You're reading the spaciousness and the empty spaces in this song as just that uncertainty, and it being all right to be in that uncertainty.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: Yeah... I had not got that far. [both laugh] But thank you. Thank you for the reminder of that thing, which... Yeah, being OK with uncertainty.

I -- You know, the voice that comes in, the text that you just quoted, "If you find love, love like it's the first time, God only knows it will be the last time." So that voice, I don't think it's her voice, but it's kind of hard to tell because they're using a vocoder and it sounds really, really, like, mechanical.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: What's that about? Why would those lines, like, sound kind of like they're coming from a robot?

Marlha: [long pause] Yeah! [laughs] That's a good question. I had not ever thought about it.

ELG: I, the first few times I heard the song,

I couldn't understand what was being said. In fact, I had to go and look up the lyrics to get what that vocoder voice is actually saying. And, you know, I'll be honest, so to go back to my worries about this song, this was one of them. It's like, well, those are really crucial lines. Why are they given to this, like, robotic voice? And, you know, what's going on with that? So I worried about that, and I worried about that, and I worried about that.

Marlha: [laughs]

ELG: And then I went onto the Internet and I found another version of this song. And it looks to me that this is Alicia Keys in her home studio doing a COVID performance of it. So it's just her and her keyboard.

Marlha: Ooohhh. I love it when it's just her and her keyboard!

ELG: It's a whole 'nother experience, and you don't have some of these kind of special effects -- you know, there's the vocoder voice and there's the ocean sounds at the very end of the song and all that stuff, you know -- she's not doing any of that. It's just her and her keyboard. And she sings this song. And when it gets to the place where the robot voice comes in, she just speaks to the camera. And she kind of says things like, "Oh, you feeling it?" you know, "Is it getting better?" And she's just so natural and un--... she's not trying to do anything except what she already does, so beautifully, and... For me it was a completely different experience of the song and all my worries about it, I realized, "You know what, that's not her. That's the arrangers. She works with these arrangers, you know, and they saw fit to do these things to the song." Which are beautiful, but for me, were kind of a little bit off-putting. But --.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: --if you go to that YouTube version, it's very, very warm and sweet and genuine.

Marlha: I want to hear that one! [laughs]

ELG: I'll send you the link. It's not hard to find, but I'll send it to you.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: And it's, you know, among other things, it shows us just how important the arrangement of a song can be.

____________________________________

INSERT #2

NOTE: this is not a translation but discusses the same themes in each language.

ELG: OK, David. I want to start by just listening to a little bit of that other version of "Authors of Forever," the one I mention in the interview, where Alicia Keys recorded it [with] just herself and her keyboard. So let's have a little listen to that.

David: Great.

MUSIC CLIP #3

Alicia Keys, “Authors of Forever” Youtube version

ELG: OK. So, yeah, they really are so different, I would almost say that they are different songs, because the sonic face of them is so...is so distinct... I'd love to hear you speak to us a little bit about this, David. Where is the line between composition and arrangement? What makes an arrangement not just recomposition, and how does this work, you know, with an artist [of] the stature of Alicia Keys, how does this work on her end?

David: Well, OK, so that's a pretty big question. Traditionally, composition has to do with creating something, right? So, creating something original. No one else is ever saying that melody with those words, because they came from you first. Typically, we see that as a composition. Arrangement traditionally has to do with the components of the song.

ELG: Hmm.

David: Right. So let's say you're using trumpets and trombones. Traditionally, you would have somebody who has focused a lot of their time on just knowing how to make sure that the trumpets and trombones sound great in that song. There's people that go to school just to know how to do this.

ELG: Wow.

David: Right. It's an art in and of itself, away from composition.

ELG: Uh-huh.

David: So, those are the two traditionally the two main parts of composition. Someone makes the song arrangement. Someone understands how to manipulate the components of the song, right? Now, in the pop context, the Alicia Keys context, things get kind of blurred a little bit because...her working with her producer created the version that we hear on the record, with all of the digital instruments.

ELG: Mm hmm.

David: And her voice and the components of that song, the chorus, the pre-chorus, the hook, all of this working in tandem with the producer. So in essence, the producer is also responsible for some of the arranging. So with pop music, everything starts to blur. It's not as cut and dry.

ELG: Yeah, I'm getting that sense. And you know, that old phrase, "It takes a village..."

David: Yeah.

ELG: It sounds like a village situation. What's so interesting about this, though, is that, you know, when you say to somebody, "Authors of Forever," they're going to say, "Oh, Alicia Keys!" She's the only one we hear about in that whole village situation.

David: Yeah, yeah, and that's why it's so important for people to take the time to really -- I mean, if I'm going to be honest: buy an album! Because usually on the album you'll have the album credits. Or if you buy digitally, make sure that it comes with the PDF.

ELG: Mm.

David: Because on there will always be listed the composer of the song, arrangers, personnel, which are the people who actually play the instruments; the producers, even the beat producers, and any other people that worked on these projects, right? So usually people just say, "Oh, I love Alicia Keys' album." Well, Alicia Keys didn't walk into the studio alone and then come out with an album. She worked with many other people. Some of those songs for sure weren't her own, which isn't bad, because it's her performances that touches so much.

ELG: Yeah.

David: But there's also a whole, like you said, a village behind the product that we attach so much meaning to.

____________

Marlha: Yeah, I think it's really interesting, too, how like, how different the delivery lands for us. As different people, you know? Like when I'm thinking about that voice that comes in, that's robotic, for me, I can still see it in a positive way, because I feel like that's a hard message for us to hear, as people.

So I feel like it's almost, like, kind of cool that they did it that way? Because it's like, it's this voice of, like, wisdom. But it's a hard message for us to hear. And them doing it that way, like literally makes it hard for us to hear.

ELG: Wow, that's super cool. I like that a lot! Yeah! Yeah, like maybe if God were to decide to actually, like, speak directly to us, maybe it would be that hard to understand. Because, you know -- [both laugh] Who knows? But that I like that a lot. OK, that helps me. Thank you! [both laugh] -- I don't like struggling with songs, you know.

Marlha: Yeah.

ELG: But sometimes -- and I know I'm not alone in this -- sometimes I hear things that just put me off or they disturb me, or they hang me up, and that's one reason I really like talking about music with people, is sometimes, you know, you just talk to someone who's got a different set of ears, and they can just help you get past something.

Marlha: Yeah, it's so cool! To hear, like, the different perspectives and like... It's so cool that you notice that the beats are kind of the same, you know, that it's a march, that's so cool.

ELG: I mean, that was...that was just pure chance. I played one song and then I played the other and I was like, "Oh! They're almost exactly the same tempo!” So that's... And that's very cool from my perspective, that both the songs you chose to represent these differently facing aspects of your own life, that they had this kind of rhythmic unity to them. And actually, that sort of leads to, I think, a good wrapping-up question. So... There's this kind of constant rhythm that is going through these two songs that represent two different aspects of your life. At the same time there are...there are very obvious differences. Just the intensity, you know, the density and the intensity of Anita Tijoux's song, and then the calm, spacious, "Just let it be the way it is" kind of non-intensity of Alicia Keys. And -- does that describe a progress in your own life, would you say? Or are both qualities kind of present at the same time?

Marlha: I think that... I think that it has been a pattern. I feel like... I don't know. I don't know when this shift happened. I'm turning 42 this year, so I feel like it's maybe kind of recent, maybe it was when I turned 40. But previous to being 40, I felt like this incredible urgency, and just like my energy is, "Go hard, go strong, go hard, go strong. I need to know!" Like, "I have to know, I have to know!" And now, I feel like I have very much settled into this place of "I don't need to be so forceful, I don't need --" There's not such an urgency, you know?

And I think also my partner has really helped me with this. Like, we're not trying to get it all done right, right now. Like, it's a journey. And we should enjoy the journey. And it's OK to just kind of slow down, and make space for what is happening in the moment instead of always rushing to get X, Y and Z done, you know, for whatever reason...Yeah!

ELG: Ah, those are wise words. And, and you know, quite often when you manage to do that -- you know, to just unplug a little bit -- the things that so need doing, they, you find that they kind of magically do themselves!

Marlha: Yeah, it all ends up all right!

ELG: There you go.

Marlha: For the most part! [laughs]

ELG: Well, yeah, except when it doesn't, of course. But we are only individuals and we can only do what we can do. We cannot do everything. And yeah, I get you there. I mean I struggle with that one every day! And I really appreciate, Marlha, just your…the wisdom that's coming through your words, and the  openness, the openness to... empty space maybe, or the openness to incompletion. That's a lesson I'm going to take away from this interview, and just be kind of digesting it.

Marlha: Thank you so much. This was so fun.

ELG: It's SO fun. I just love doing these interviews. My gosh. Every single one of them. And yeah, this was a beauty. Thank you, Marlha.

Marlha: Thank you.

Would you like to know more?

On our website at siyofuera.org, you can find complete transcripts in both languages of every interview, our Blog about the issues of history, culture, and politics that come up around every song, links for listeners who might want to pursue a theme further, and some very cool imagery. You’ll find playlists of all the songs from all the interviews to date, and our special Staff-curated playlist as well.

We invite your comments or questions! Contact us at our website or participate in the Si Yo Fuera conversation on social media. We’re out there on FaceBook and Instagram. And then there’s just plain old word of mouth. If you like our show, do please tell your friends to give it a listen. And do please subscribe, on any of the major podcast platforms. We’ll bring a new interview for you, every two weeks on Friday mornings.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, and Wesley McClintock are our sound engineers; Zoë Broussard and Laura Díaz hold down the marketing; David Castañeda is Music Researcher; Jen Orenstein translates interviews to and from Spanish; Deyaneira García and Alex Dolven make production possible. We are a not-for-profit venture, currently and gratefully funded by the John Paul Simon Guggenheim Foundation, UCLA’s Faculty Grants Program, and the Herb Alpert School of Music.

For now, and until the next interview—keep listening to one another!

I’m Elisabeth Le Guin, and this is, “Si yo fuera una canción -- If I were a song…”

Español

Saludos y bienvenidxs al episodio más reciente de “Si yo fuera una canción.” Somos un podcast y programa de radio, en donde la gente de Santa Ana, California nos cuenta en sus propias palabras, de las músicas que más le importan.

ELG: Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, la anfitriona del programa, y Directora del proyecto.

Este proyecto se basa en mi convicción que nosotrxs, la gente del mundo moderno, necesitamos aprender a mejor escucharnos; y que la música, con todo lo que nos conlleva, es el lugar perfecto para empezar.

DAVID: Mi nombre es David Castañeda, investigador de música aquí en el podcast SYFUC. Estoy muy feliz de ser parte de este proyecto, utilizando mi entrenamiento académico y mi experiencia profesional como músico, para traerles las historias, la música y las experiencias vividas de quienes viven aquí en Santa Ana.

Tal como varixs de nuestrxs entrevistadxs, Marlha menciona El Centro Cultural de México en el curso de nuestra plática. He hablado de El Centro en otra ocasión, pero para nuestrxs oyentes más nuevxs, tomaré un ratito ahora para presentarlo de nuevo. El Centro ha sido una institución santanera durante casi 25 años. Allá se hospedan clases y eventos, gratis o de bajo costo, de las artes tradicionales mexicanas y la cultura mexicana. También ha servido como núcleo del activismo comunitario por parte de lxs inmigrantes, trabajadorxs, y lxs que no tienen papeles. El sitio físico ha permanecido cerrado durante año y medio debido a la pandemia, pero el espíritu sigue fuerte. Mientras grabe estas palabras, el Centro está preparando para la reapertura.

ELG: Bueno. ¡Bienvenida, Marlha! Estoy encantada de que hayas decidido hacer una entrevista con nosotrxs, y estoy muy emocionada por la música que escogiste, y, pues, de tener esta conversación contigo y poder conocerte un poquito mejor a través de ella. Entonces, dinos tu nombre y lo que te gustaría que la gente sepa de ti en el contexto público, y cómo llegaste a estar en Santa Ana. ¿Qué te trajo hasta aquí? ¿Qué es lo que te inspira permanecer aquí?

Marlha: Sí, claro. Mi nombre es Marlha Sánchez y soy madre de dos increíbles niñxs LGBTQ. Y lo que me trae y lo que me trajo a Santa Ana fueron mis abuelos. Eran trabajadores agrícolas en la California central y deseaban una vida diferente para sus hijxs. Y entonces, vinieron acá, y nuestra familia se quedó aquí. Aquí viven mis tías y tíos, mis papás, las hermanas de mi mamá se mudaron para acá. Y entonces echamos raíces. Y de hecho, yo pasaba mucho tiempo tratando de salir de aquí porque no sentía que habían muchas personas con los mismos valores o la misma visión de cómo uno deberÍa vivir. Y entonces me mudé a Napa por un tiempito para ir a la universidad. Y luego volví y encontré... ¡encontré a mi gente!

ELG: Órale. ¿Crees que algo en Santa Ana había cambiado durante el tiempo en que no estabas?

Marlha: No. De hecho, es muy gracioso porque tenía amigos que me habían contado sobre El Centro, pero nunca lo ubicaba antes de que me mudé. Y yo estaba como “Qué pena, ¡nunca puedo encontrar a esta gente!” Y ya después, cuando me mudé, mi hermano empezó a ir a conciertos punk en El Centro. Y todavía no lo encontraba hasta unos años después de que volví. Pero cuando lo encontré, creo que era el momento perfecto. Ya tenía a mis hijxs y…era un buen momento para nosotrxs haber encontrado a ese espacio. Lo necesitábamos mucho en ese entonces. Así que, era el momento oportuno, el momento  divino. [ambas se ríen]

ELG: Tan interesante. Tengo unas preguntitas. Dices que tus abuelos se trasladaron aquí. ¿Es correcto? ¿Lo entendí--?

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Y ¿cuándo, aproximadamente, habría sido eso?

Marlha: Era a los principios de llos años cincuenta

ELG: Guau.

Marlha: Como en 1951. Se me hace que compraron la casa en que ahora vivimos en el ’52 o ’53.

ELG: Sí, yo… Sí, estoy tratando de imaginar a Santa Ana a los principios de los 50. Sé que era muy diferente de lo que es ahora.

Marlha: Sí. Me dicen que era muy diferente. Hasta cuando yo era pequeña a los principios de los 80 en este vecindario, era muy distinto de como es hoy en día.

ELG: Sí, he oído bastante eso. La gente suele decirme que la zona en donde vivo, al lado sur de la ciudad, era realmente una zona bastante peligrosa, o así me lo dice. Y seguramente, no es mi experiencia ahora. Entonces, evidentemente, ha pasado por grandes cambios. Sí. Y sigue cambiando, claro.

Marlha: Sí, de hecho, mis papás viven más o menos cerca de ti. Ahí crecí, más hacia Main y Edinger. Y me acuerdo de tiroteos desde los coches, y, pues, amigxs, o sea, tantas personas se murieron en los 90, sabes, en el vecindario.

ELG: Guau. Guau.

Marlha: Es muy diferente [ahora].

ELG: Sí, es muy diferente. Órale. Qué cosa…También te quería preguntar un poquito más sobre I’d say here, “Otra cosa en que querría que te profundizaras un poquito más, es que tú,” como lo entendí, dijiste que estabas como que buscando algo aquí en Santa Ana sin encontrarlo, y fue por eso por lo que sentías la necesidad de?marchar. Y sí te marchaste por un tiempo.

¿Nos puedes contar un poco más sobre lo que buscabas?

Marlha: Sí, ¡ni siquiera estoy tan segura de que lo sabía en ese entonces! [se ríe]

ELG: Uh-huh.

Marlha: Yo tan solo… Lo que sí sabía era que no me encajaba en ningún lado. Incluso en mi propia familia sentía que no me?encajaba, como que la gente no entendía mi forma de pensar, o como que mis sentimientos eran tan…eran tanto…y sabía que la vida podía llevarnos mucho más? Y que a mí me parecía que muchas cosas no estaban bien, que creo que en ese momento el modo de vida con que me podía identificar era más bien como…como el de los hippies. ¿Sabes?

ELG: Ah-hah.

Marlha: Era como, “Quiero vivir más libre. Quiero tener una conexión más fuerte con la tierra.” Y no tenía muchos puntos de referencia por lo que eso significaba para mí, desde donde yo vengo, porque siempre lo había visto a través de una lente eurocéntrica... como este movimiento “hippie” o todo lo que es “New Age.” Y yo no tenía una forma clara de comprender qué eso significaba para mí, para mi familia, y cuáles fueron nuestras raíces, en ese tipo de vida.

ELG: Sí.

Marlha: Entonces estaba buscando algo fuera de mí misma en mi comunidad; y luego tenía que volver a mi comunidad para buscar mis raíces y mi…sabes, esa cosa que en aquel tiempo no podía nombrar. Porque no creo que lo llamaría así ahora. [se ríe]

ELG: Sí, cierto. Y, o sea, ni sé si es buena idea darle nombre, porque es más bien un complejo de valores, ¿no? De hecho… yo sospecho, dado las canciones que seleccionaste para esta entrevista, que vamos a acercarnos un poco más a lo que es ese complejo, al hablar de la música que escogiste.

Marlha: Mm-hm.

ELG: Entonces, cuéntanos un poco sobre la primera canción que elegiste y por qué la elegiste, y, quizás, cuándo y cómo la canción entró en tu vida.

Marlha: Claro que sí. La primera canción que escogí es “Vengo” por Ana Tijoux, que… no recuerdo precisamente cuando entró en mi vida, sé que fue hace muchos años. Y umm… ¿cuál fue la otra pregunta?

ELG: Quizás unas palabras sobre por qué la escogiste.

Marlha: Ah, sí. La escogí parcialmente por la mezcla de la música. Una parte para mí es el rap. Crecí con ese tipo de música en mi barrio. Y en mi familia, pues, el hip hop y rap eran las únicas músicas que escuchábamos. Entonces eso para mí [representa] el lado de mi familia que viene de los Estados Unidos. Mi papá es chicano, así que también a él le gusta este género de música. Tenemos gustos parecidos. Mi mamá es inmigrante de Veracrúz. Y entonces me gustaba mucho el hecho de que hay como un sonido Indígena [en esta canción de Tijoux], como, mesoamericano mezclado con el rap.

ELG: Sí…sí, yo –

Marlha: Y luego la letra es muy, pues, tan relevante.

ELG: ¡Es asombrosa! Es como un chorro de palabras que sale de esta canción. Es… o sea, esto se puede decir muchas veces del hip hop, claro.

Marlha: Sí. [ambas se ríen]

ELG: Pero hay algo en la manera de que suelta esas palabras. Eso es…digo, estoy completamente de acuerdo contigo. Es muy convincente.

Marlha: Mm-hm.

ELG: Entonces sí, muchas palabras. Y, ¿cuáles son las cosas que ella dice en esta canción que realmente te llamaron la atención, en las primeras veces que la escuchaste?

Marlha: Sentí que mucho de lo que ella dice es tan…auténtico, y como que poderoso y vulnerable a la vez. Que es exactamente como yo me siento. Me identifico mucho con eso, el deseo de venir en busca de respuestas. Venir con este conocimiento que viene de otro lado. Viene de, o sea, de nuestros antepasados. Viene de los linajes que vinieron antes de nosotrxs. Y intentar reimaginar el mundo, ¿sabes? Ver que las cosas no están tan bien, y que hay una manera diferente de proseguir, de seguir adelante. Y a involucrar el arte, ¿sabes? “Vengo con la palabra," dice. Escribo mucho, y entonces para mí, la poesía – y, pues cualquier forma de la palabra escrita es realmente increíble y poderosa, y su voz y la música y las letras, son como…  me dan escalofríos.

ELG: Mm hmm. Mm hmm. A mí también. Sí, yo… la estaba escuchándo de nuevo esta mañana y me… me asombraba mucho la urgencia de la canción. Creo que esa es la palabra que quiero. Digo, creo que mucho hip hop es urgente. Pero a veces siento que con el hip hop, la urgencia llega a convertirse en la agresión. Y existen muy buenas razónes por ello. Pero en este caso ella no hace eso. No lleva su urgencia por esos caminos. Entonces es más como… como muy puro. No sé.

Marlha: Lo encuentro como… muy sagrada. Es muy sagrada esta canción. Casi como una oración.

ELG: ¡Sí! Sí, tienes razón. Es, hay… Una oración que realmente viene ¿sale? del corazón, sabes, ¡eso llevará urgencia! Porque realmente quieres--.

Marlha: ¡Mm-hm!

ELG: Vamos a escuchar la canción.

CLIP DE MÚSICA #1:

Ana Tijoux, “Vengo

Marlha: Me hizo llorar. [se ríe]

ELG: Ayyy. Qué padre. [ambas se ríen] Digo, no es que quiero que llores, pero…

Marlha: Es un buen llanto. [se ríe]

ELG: Uh-huh. ¿Qué… qué fue lo que agarró tu corazón así, esta vez?

Marlha: ¡Siento que ella abre la canción con tanta fuerza! “Vengo en busco de respuestas,” dice. Me siento como…como que vine a esta vida con una cierta forma de sentir y pensar, queriendo cuestionar las cosas. Eso es una parte, sabes, lo de querer encontrar otro camino. Pero hay una parte en donde habla de las historias no contadas de nuestrxs antepasadxs, y el orgullo indio, y, pues, esa falta de conexión con mis orígenes, mi linaje… La mamá de mi mamá, que viene de Veracrúz – de donde también es mi mamá – ella es la última hablante de nahuatl en nuestra familia. Y no tenemos información sobre, o sea, la historia Indígena de nuestra familia. Y está igual por el lado de mi papá, digo, la familia de mi papá ha estado en los Estados Unidos desde antes de que fueran los Estados Unidos. Y hay muchos rumores, sabes, de que algún pariente era apache, o de que tenemos orígenes apaches, o navajos. Pero no tenemos conexiones reales con esas comunidades, y hemos perdido mucho… conocimiento, me parece, de tantas modalidades, y no solo conocimientos de nuestros orígenes nativos, sino también por el hecho de que mi mamá es una inmigrante. Cuando ella vino a este país, deseaba mucho dar una vida mejor a ella misma y a su familia y a sus hijxs, y entonces me dice, o sea, “sabes, quería llamarte Xochitl, pero pensaba que eso te haría mucho más difícil la vida. Y entonces decidimos llamarte Marlha, porque es más fácil de pronunciar.” ¿Sabes?

ELG: Sí.

Marlha: Y entonces hay tanta cultura que se ha perdido a causa de la religión, cambios religiosos, o por tan solo tratar de ser más “americanx” y a encajarse [en aquella cultura]. Y siento una conexión tan fuerte con formas de vivir más ancestrales, más tradicionales, así que se siente como una pérdida.

ELG: Sí, sí. Pues, sí, hay muchas razónes por las cuales podemos llorar sobre eso… Pero, sabes, lo que se destaca mucho aquí es que Ana Tijoux no está llorando. Está marchando.

Marlha: Mm-hm.

ELG: O sea, esta canción tiene… el ritmo es casi exactamente lo mismo, creo,  que la velocidad y movimiento que mantendrías si estuvieras marchando, o sea, si estuvieras caminando por una larga distancia, como, quizás, mil millas. Digo, querrías tener un ritmo [bueno] que te mantuviera en marcha. Eso es el ritmo que oigo en esta canción. Se trata de marchar adelante.

Marlha: Absolutamente.

ELG: Sabes, cuando ella dice “Vengo”, es como “¡Ya voy!”

Marlha: Mm-hm. Y venimos con todo. [ambas se ríen]. Venimos con todos lxs ancestrxs. Venimos con todos los elementos.

ELG: ¡Ándale, sí!

Marlha: Y estamos construyendo algo. Siento que es una canción tan… tan optimista. Como que sí, te da un sentido de fuerza, y pues, de propósito.

ELG: Sí, y, sabes, y... a pesar de todo lo que se ha perdido, lo cual acabas de mencionar, el...  que es más que trágico, todo lo que se ha perdido, todo lo que se ha destruído. Pienso mucho en esto desde mi posición como historiadora, y…

Cuánto más trabajes con las historias de los pueblos que no necesariamente escribieron libros de sus propias historias, que mantuvieron”sus historias de boca en boca a través de las generaciones, o sea, mucho de eso se ha perdido en muchos de los casos.

La emigración tiene mucho que ver con eso. Y pues, varios genocidios también tienen mucho que ver.

Marlha: Mm-hm.

ELG: Así que vivo en ese espacio de luto, pienso que lo reconozco. Es --  mi posición es un poco distinta a la tuya, pero creo que hay una relación entre estos lutos, si se puede decir. Y, y ¡aún así! Aquí viene Ana Tijoux con todo su… ¡su tribu!  Yo la imagino como un gran grupo de mujeres con pelo negro y los pómulos marcados y tan solo están marchando. Vienen.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Y sí, es, es… Estoy de acuerdo en que es muy optimista. Y eso es el truco, ¿no? A sacar esperanzas de un pasado que ha sido como destrozado, y manipulado y oprimido y editado…

____________

ENCARTE #1

NOTA: no es una traducción, sino trata de temas parecidos. Los diálogos de encartes se hablan de manera improvisada

David: ¡OK, Elisabeth! Aquí tenemos a Ana Tijoux y su canción "Vengo." ¡Guau! Hay mucho aquí en esta canción. Por favor, habla un poco de esta canción.

ELG: Bueno, la canción "Vengo" es la canción titular de todo un álbum, también con título "Vengo," a que -- creo que este álbum ha llegado a ser como un tipo de monumento a los sentimientos descoloniales de la comunidad inmigrante aquí en Santa Ana, y en muchos lugares más, no solamente aquí. Es notable el éxito que ha tenido Anita Tijoux mundialmente, al hablar por parte de las comunidades que están en lucha, las comunidades oprimidas, las comunidades Indígenas, las comunidades de bajos recursos, lo que sea. Así que es -- bueno, es música abiertamente política, no? Y lo hace con gran destreza y gran belleza. Es que va al grano con lo político, no? pero lo mezcla, lo cuece, con la poesía y los vuelos de la fantasía y las palabras bien escogidas. Y también otra cosa que quiero mencionar es que, si es música comercial. Bueno-- no se hace en el garaje, sabes?

David: ¡No!

ELG: Es muy cuidadosamente y expertamente producida la música, y suena muy bien. Yo veo el proyecto de Anita Tijoux como un proyecto admirable, excelente y también – incompleto. Anita Tijoux goza muchos privilegios en el mundo, y un privilegio es tener acceso a buenos arreglistas y músicos para ayudarla, no? Y...si realmente quiere la liberación, ya sabe que va a llegar un momento en que ella tendrá que dejar el micrófono, que dejar el estudio de grabación, que dejar la -- bueno, la guitarra! en las manos de la gente por quiénes habla. Y yo creo que Anita Tijoux sí reconoce este hecho; pero lo quiero mencionar, porque es fundamental a cualquier música política. Los que más necesitan el micrófono son lxs oprimidxs.

_____________

Marlha: Sí… [pausa] – Sí, siento fuertemente que para mí ha sido una llamada, como esta profunda – y creo que hasta lo dice en la canción—como una urgencia por conocer las historias, porque no queremos volver a repetir [todos esos horrores]. Queremos ver el mundo de una forma distinta, queremos crear el mundo de una forma distinta. Como, para mi, esa es la llamada. Y eso, pienso, es lo que buscaba cuando me fui de Santa Ana a encontrar esa cosa. Era como “quiero – quiero que el mundo sea diferente.”

ELG: Sí.

Marlha: Y, ¿Cómo lo hacemos, y ¿quién lo está haciendo ahora?

ELG: Sí. Y entonces… ¿Cómo lo estás haciendo tú? Si brincamos al presente por un momento. ¿De qué forma ha tu camino reflejado esta marcha, la ‘venida’ de qué habla Tijoux?

Marlha: Yo creo que mucho tiene que ver con el trabajo que ahora estoy haciendo con Unidos Home-School Cooperative. (La Cooperativa de educar en casa “Unidos”). Y en asegurarme de que las cosas que nunca me enseñaron a mí en la escuela, sean enseñadas desde el principio a mis hijxs, y a los demás niñxs que están estudiando con nosotrxs. Que les enseñemos sobre los varios tipos de música de diferentes partes de [este continente en que vivimos, el cual algunxs habitantes Indígenas han nombrado] “La isla de la tortuga,” como Mesoamérica y Sudamérica, ¡y todo! Y de realmente reconocer las tribus diferentes, las lenguas distintas, las tradiciones distintas, y crear relaciones aquí en donde estamos ahora, con las tribus que son las cuidadoras originarias de estas tierras, lxs Ajacchemen y lxs Tongva. Vamos y pasamos tiempo con ellxs en sus luchas y sus celebraciones. Y tenemos amistades que vamos construyendo. Tan solo para crear comunidad. Pienso que la comunidad es una gran parte de esto. Y creo que esa es la razón por la cual me he encontrado atraída a ciertos espacios, porque allí hay una semejanza de valores y hay esta cohesión en términos de la comunidad, no únicamente la familia nuclear que tan solo se cuida de su propio grupito, pero hay una comunidad más grande y todxs se cuidan mutuamente.

ELG: Y luego, llevar eso hacia adelante en una iniciativa educativa. Digo—lxs niñxs en la cooperativa, ¿se sienten como que están yendo a la escuela, en algún sentido de que, o sea, que yo reconocería? [ambas se ríen]

Marlha: Es muy diferente. Antes de la pandemia, estuvimos en nuestra casa. Entonces era como, no teníamos una sala de clases, no hay aula. Hacíamos la clase en el patio, o en el jardín, y preparábamos el almuerzo juntxs en la cocina.

ELG: Mm hmm.

Marlha: Y hay como un ritmo informal. Pero también tratamos de ser bien flexibles. Y realmente enfrentar, sabes—se trata de niñxs pequeñxs. Entonces a veces hay conflicto y paramos todo. Paramos una lección para enfrentar el conficto como grupo.

ELG: Sí. ¡Qué diferente es eso!

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Sí. Así que, una parte fundamental aquí, me parece, sería la salud del colectivo, de la comunidad, en cualquier momento, que eso es más importante que cualquier… programa.

Marlha: Absolutamente. [suelta una risita.]

ELG: Sí. Estoy parada aquí intentando de imaginarme un mundo en  el cual, si tan solo ese principio operara, o sea, en nuestros sistemas de gobernación ahora de alguna manera consistente, ¿Cómo sería? Pienso que lo tenemos ¿alcanzamos? por momentos, pero son fugaces, sabes, tan... No logro cumplir esa disquisición teórica porque sé que sería diferente.

ELG: Bueno, quiero asegurarme de que consigue los enlaces públicos a tu escuela, para publicarlos en nuestro sitio Web.

Cuando emitamos tu episodio, coordinémoslo. Así la gente puede enterarse un poco más de lo que haces. Es muy emocionante. Digo, o sea, se oye esto mucho, pero es la simple verdad: Lxs niñxs son el futuro.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Si vas a… si vas a cambiar las cosas, ¡es un buen lugar para comenzar!

Marlha: Sí. [se ríe] Seguro. Sí, eso es exactamente como yo lo veo.

ELG: Sí. Bueno, este tema nos da un buen eje para”pasar a la segunda canción que escogiste, para representar algunos de tus esperanzas para el futuro. Y entonces, escogiste “Authors of Forever,” es decir, “Los autores de la eternidad” por Alicia Keys, que… tan solo salió en el año pasado. Es una canción bastante nueva.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Y… ¿qué tal si primero la escuchemos y luego hablamos?

Marlha: Sí, sí, ándale.

ELG: ¡Vamos!

CLIP DE MÚSICA # 2

Alicia Keys “Authors of Forever”

ELG: Cuéntame un poco de cuándo sería más probable que escucharas esta canción.

Marlha: ¡A mí me gusta escuchar a Alicia Keys todo el tiempo! Mientras que me bañe, en el carro… Y en esta canción en particular, me encanta como suena su voz. Yo… Ella es una de esas artistas con las que siempre cantaré en coro porque… sus palabras y la música son tan bellas. Esta es algo que escucharía cuando me siento triste… me sirve de dos maneras. La escucho cuando quiero llorar y la escucho cuando quiero un poco de fuerza, de esperanza –

ELG: Sí.

Marlha: -- un poco de paz, sabes…

ELG: ¿No se te hace raro como – creo que esto es bastante común, sé que yo lo hago—como pensamos que llorar y adquirir fuerza son de algún modo, distinto el uno al otro?

Marlha: Mmm. ¡Sí!

ELG: O sea, puede ser que llorar es en realidad, una manera de ponernos en contacto con nuestra fuerza.

Marlha: Ay, ¡me encanta eso! No lo había pensado de esa forma antes.

ELG: -- Pero, sabes como cuando lloras un buen rato sobre algo, al menos yo, frecuentemente, después, me siento renovada.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Y… sabes, quizás tan solo es la catarsis, o el hecho de soltar algunas cosas, pero a veces tienes que soltarlas para que entren otras que te lleven hacía adelante.

Marlha: Sí...

ELG: Entonces me parece que esas dos funciones, se combinan de una cierta forma. Sí. Así que ella repite: "It's all right, it's all right." Todo está bien.

Marlha: ¡Me parece que lo diste en el clavo! Como no lo había visto de esa manera antes, pero creo que eso es mucho de lo que esta canción representa, ¿cierto? Porque se trata de, como, la dualidad del ser humano. Y, pues, nos equivocamos. Odiamos, o sea, dudamos, estamos… estamos luchando. Pero, está bien. Lo vamos a sobrevivir. Sabes, todavía tenemos que amar con fuerza, porque estamos aquí tan solo, ¡quizás tan solo una vez! [ambas se ríen] ¿Quién sabe?

ELG: Seguramente, esta versión es tan solo una vez.

Marlha: Sí, precisamente. [se ríe]

ELG: Sí… y hace una pareja buenísima con la primera canción. Porque en la primera, ella viene, va a llegar, está en camino, así que prepárense, ¿no? Y en esta canción, es más bien como, “todxs estamos aquí. Aquí es donde estamos.” Y puede que no está yendo tan bien a veces. Pero… pero está bien.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Es como una invitación a seguir adelante, supongo.

Marlha: Sí… a ser tiernos el uno con el otro. Me parece que es tan fácil para mí, y creo que para otras personas también, a perdernos en echar la culpa en lxs demás por sus circunstancias, o culparlxs por no hacer lo que nosotrxs haríamos en sus circunstancias. Y me siento como que en la canción, nos recuerda de que todxs estamos aquí con nuestras experiencias únicas que forman quienes somos. Y todo eso es válido. Y aún podemos traer tanta belleza y luz al mundo, y, de nuevo, pues, recrear el mundo en la forma que queremos, y en la forma que nos hace sentir segurxs y amadxs, mientras aceptamos a lxs demás.

ELG: Sí, y, pues, sí, ahí está la esperanza para el futuro, claro. ¿Cuál es, como la segunda o tercera línea que canta? y la voy a recordar mal. No la tengo escrita frente a mí. Pero se trata de, como, ¿amando y dando la bienvenida a los espacios entre nosotrxs?

Marlha: Sí. "We embrace the space between us, 'cos it's all right." (“abrazamos el espacio entre nosotrxs, porque está bien.”)

ELG: Ahí está. Gracias.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Sí. Es que… yo no conocía esta canción. He estado familiarizándome con ella en estos días. Y he tenido una experiencia interesante con ella que te quiero contar brevemente. Es que escuché la versión que me mandaste, que es la versión en Apple Music, y la escuché varias veces. Y pensaba, tú sabes – pues pensaba todos mis pensamientos musicólogos sobre ella, o sea – [ambas se ríen] Pero me asombraba que, en comparación con la canción de Ana Tijoux, esta canción va casi al mismo ritmo. Tiene ese ritmo caminante.  Y pensé “Qué chido.” Que ambas canciones están como, caminando hacia adelante. No tienen prisa, pero tampoco se paran. Así que, tienen eso en común. Pero luego, esta canción es muuuucho más amplia. Es… o sea, ella no está entregando un montón de palabras con urgencia, no tiene esa urgencia. Tiene más, como, espacio abierto, de una cierta forma. Y empecé a sentir como si ese espacio abierto fuera, como una clase de vacío; y eso me llevaba por un camino de preguntarme, “¿Ella realmente cree lo que dice? ¿De veras piensa que está bien?” Me parece que lo dice, lo canta desde un lugar muy solitario”– un lugar acústicamente solitario. ¡Y me preocupaba por eso! [ambas se ríen] – Entonces, hay una resolución a este cuentito. Pero antes de que te diga lo que fue mi resolución personal, te quiero preguntar si tienes algún pensamiento sobre eso, o sea, la espaciosidad de la canción.

Marlha: ¡Sí! Yo siempre lo interpreto como, el silencio será lo desconocido. O sea, la pregunta de “¿está todo bien?” Está bien sentarse con eso. Está bien no saber. Eso no quiere decir que nos paremos… Sabes, pienso que una gran parte de este proceso de devenir es, estar bien en esos espacios, y estar bien con no saber lo que realmente va a pasar.

ELG: Ay, ahora me estas haciendo llorar a MÍ. Caramba. Eso es bello.

Marlha: Yo pienso, o sea, para mí también, es la parte en donde viene la otra voz, y él habla de que "If you find love, love like it's the first time, God only knows it will be the last time." (“Si encuentras el amor, ama como es ¿si fuera? la primera vez, Dios sabe [si] será la última vez”). Me parece que eso también es una parte del asunto. Entramos en relaciones con las personas, y queremos que duren para siempre, pero, la verdad es que no sabemos para dónde la relación nos va a llevar, sea amistad o pareja, y… me parece que me he atascado tanto sobre la necesidad de saber y de definir, que estoy tratando de aprender cómo estar bien con lo de, “Este amor o amistad es lo que es, por ahora.” Y hay que tratar de disfrutarlo todo, en este momento. Porque, o sea, se puede acabar en cualquier momento.

ELG: Sí. Y entonces tú…entiendes la espaciosidad y lo vacío de la canción como [imágenes sonoros de] esa incertidumbre, y el hecho de estar bien con tal incertidumbre.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Sí… Yo no lo había pensado tan a fondo [ambas se ríen] Pero gracias. Gracias por el recordatorio de esa cosa, que… Sí, el estar bien con la incertidumbre.

Yo – sabes, esa voz que entra con las letras que acabas de citar, "If you find love, love like it's the first time, God only knows it will be the last time." Pues, esa voz, no creo que es la voz de Alicia Keys, pero es difícil saber porque están usando un vocoder y suena bastante, pues muy mecánica.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: ¿Por qué sería así? ¿Por qué sonarían esas líneas como si vinieran de un robot?

Marlha: [pausa larga] ¡Sí! [se ríe] Es una buena pregunta. Yo nunca lo había contemplado.

ELG: Yo, en las primeras veces que escuchaba la canción, no entendía lo que se decía. De hecho, tuve que ir a investigar las letras para entender lo que dice la voz del vocoder. Y sabes, para ser honesta, volviendo a mis preocupaciones sobre esta canción, esta fue una de ellas.  Es como, pues, esas líneas son bien importantes. ¿Por qué las dice una voz robótica? Y, o sea, ¿qué es lo que pasa con eso? Entonces me preocupaba por eso, y me preocupaba por eso, y me preocupaba por eso.

Marlha: [se ríe]

ELG: Y entonces me conecté al internet y encontré una otra versión de la canción. Y me parece que, en ésta, Alicia Keys está en el estudio de su casa, haciendo un espactáculo tipo COVID en línea. Así que es tan solo ella y su teclado.

Marlha: Ooo, ¡me encanta cuando es tan solo ella y su teclado!

ELG: Es una experiencia completamente distinta, y no tienes esos efectos especiales, como la voz del vocoder, o los sonidos del océano al final de la canción, y todas esas cosas, o sea—ella no hace nada de eso. Y cuando llega a la parte en donde entra la voz del robot, ella simplemente le habla [mirando directo]  a la cámara. Y dice cosas como: “¿Te lo sientes?” o sea,

“¿Se está mejorando?” Y es tan natural y no—no está intentando hacer nada más que lo que ya hace, con tanta belleza, y… Para mí fue una experiencia totalmente diferente de la canción, y de mis preocupaciones sobre ella, y  me di cuenta de que, “¿sabes qué? eso no es ella. Son las arreglistas. Ella trabaja con varixs arreglistas, sabes, y a ellxs les parecía bien hacer estas cosas I’d say, “introducir estos cambios” a la canción.” Pueden ser que sean hermosas; pero para mi, eran un poco repelentes. Pero --.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: --Sí vas a esa versión en YouTube, es muy, muy acogedora, y dulce y genuina.

Marlha: ¡Quiero escuchar esa versión! [se ríe]

ELG: Te voy a mandar el enlace. No es difícil de encontrar, pero te lo mando.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Y es, o sea, entre otras cosas, nos enseña que tan importante puede ser el arreglo de una canción.

_____________________________________

INSERT #2

NOTA: no es una traducción, sino trata de temas parecidos. Los diálogos de encartes se hablan de manera improvisada

ELG: Entonces, David, se me ocurre que sería buena idea escuchar la segunda versión de la canción "Authors of Forever,”para que experimentemos la diferencia de sonido entre las dos versiones. Así que, esta es la versión con Alicia Keys y su teclado, y nada más.

David: OK.

CLIP DE MÚSICA #3

Alicia Keys, “Authors of Forever” Versión Youtube

ELG: Bueno, se puede escuchar fácilmente que son muy diferentes. Yo casi diría que son dos canciones diferentes, pero -- pero no. Y eso para mí me conduce a una pregunta, que tiene que ver con la diferencia entre la composición de una canción, y el arreglamiento de una canción. ¿Dónde está esta diferencia? ¿Cómo se hace en el caso de una canción de pop como esta de Alicia Keys?

David: Guau! Bueno, a una pregunta pesada, como dicen los músicos. Guau! Okay. Composición muy generalmente tiene que ver con la creación de algo original, no? Tiene que ver con la creación de la melodía con las letras. El arreglo tiene que ver con los componentes, no? Con los -- en inglés se dice los "horns," right?

ELG: A los, como vientos y metales.

David: Exacto, vientos, metales. En inglés se llama "rhythm section," que puede ser, piano, bajo, percusión, sino drumset. Alguien que hace los arreglos, es alguien que sabe cómo hacer un "chart" que tiene todas esas notas bien escritas, para que las ideas así estén claras para todos.

ELG: Ah hah.

David: So, composición tiene que ver con la creación de la música originalmente las letras, la melodía, pero el arreglo tiene que ver con todo lo demás en la música. Y en el caso de Alicia Keys, en [el] caso de la música pop, puedes tener alguien más que es un "producer," que en español se dice "un productor," no? Que tiene la visión, tiene la idea del álbum en completo. Y esa persona, trabajando con el artista, ellos dos crean esa visión dentro de la música.

ELG: Anjá.

David: Y el productor también puede ser un arreglista. Puede arreglar la música. Pero son diferentes.

ELG: Ah, entonces ¡mucha gente!

David: Mucha gente, muchísima.

ELG: Es todo un pueblo que se necesita para crear un álbum, crear una buena canción con buen arreglo.

David: Exacto, y por esa razón es muy importante comprar -- a lo mínimo, comprar algo que tiene el pdf con todos los músicos, todas las personas que están trabajando en ese proyecto, no? Ahí va a saber quién es el productor, quién es el compositor, quién tocó trompeta, a quien tocó piano, bajo, todo, Todos los -- las personas que han compartido su talento para realizar cualquier proyecto que uno puede disfrutar, no?

ELG: Sí. Es muy importante. Es que los gran genios -- o las grandes genios, como Alicia Keys -- tienen toda la fama, verdad? Pero también -- y estoy segura de que ella estaría de acuerdo con esto -- es muy importante reconocer que es un labor de muchos.

___________

Marlha: Sí, y también se me hace muy interesante cómo la interpretación nos afecta de maneras distintas. Como personas diferentes, ¿sabes? O sea, cuando pienso en esa voz robótica, para mí, todavía la veo de una forma positiva, porque siento que es un mensaje que nos cuesta trabajo escuchar, como seres humanos.  Entonces, me parece como, chido, que lo hicieran de esa manera. Porque es como la voz de, como, la sabiduría. Pero como que es un mensaje difícil de escuchar, al hacerlo de esa forma, literalmente lo es difícil de oír.

ELG: Guau, qué genial. ¡Me gusta mucho eso! ¡Ándale! Como si quizás Dios decidiera hablar directamente con nosotrxs, quizás sería así de difícil de entenderle. Porque, o sea – [ambas se ríen] ¿Quién sabe? Pero me gusta mucho eso. Bueno, eso sí me ayuda ¡Gracias! [ambas se ríen] -- No me gusta batallar con las canciones, sabes.

Marlha: Sí.

ELG: Pero a veces – Y sé que no soy la única en esto – a veces oigo cosas que no me gustan, o que me estorban, o me choco con algo, y esa es una de las razones por qué me gusta hablar con la gente sobre la música, porque, de vez en cuando, tan solo necesito hablar con alguien que tenga otra forma de oír, que me pueda ayudar a dejar atrás lo que me molestaba, [o de escucharlo de otra manera.]

Marlha: Sí, ¡es tan chido! Escuchar, o sea, las perspectivas distintas y como… Es tan padre que te dieras cuenta de que los ritmos están parecidos, sabes, que es una marcha, eso es tan chido.

ELG: Pues digo, eso fue… la pura suerte. Escuché una y luego la otra y me dijé “¡Ay! ¡Van casi al mismo tiempo!” Entonces, eso es… De mi perspectiva, es bien padre que ambas canciones que escogiste para representar aspectos opuestos de tu vida tengan como una unidad rítmica. Y, de hecho, eso me lleva a lo que pienso que sea una buena pregunta para cerrar la conversación. Entonces… Hay este ritmo constante que fluye por ambas canciones que representan dos aspectos distintos de tu vida. Y al mismo tiempo hay… hay diferencias muy obvias. Tan solo la intensidad, o sea, la densidad y intensidad de la canción de Ana Tijoux, y luego la calma, la espaciosidad, esa no-intensidad .con el mensaje de “que dejemos que las cosas sean como son,” de Alicia Keys. Y – ¿dirías que eso describe una progresión en tu propia vida? O ¿están ambas cualidades presentes al mismo tiempo?

Marlha: Yo creo que… Creo que ha sido un patrón. Me siento como… no sé. No sé exactamente cuando pasó este cambio. Este año cumplo 42, entonces me siento como es quizás más reciente, quizás cuando cumplí 40. Pero antes de que me cumplí los 40, sentía una urgencia increíble, y mi energía era como “dale duro, dale fuerte, dale duro, dale fuerte. ¡Tengo que saber!” o sea “¡Tengo que saber, tengo que saber!” Y ahora me siento como que me he calmado mucho más, y he llegado a un lugar de “no tengo que ser tan contundente, no tengo que-” Ya no hay tanta urgencia, ¿sabes? Y pienso que también mi pareja me ha ayudado mucho con esto. Como, no estamos tratando de cumplir todo ahorita mismo. O sea, es un viaje. Y debemos de disfrutar el viaje. Y está bien bajar la velocidad, y dar espacio a lo que está pasando en el momento en vez de siempre andar corriendo para hacer X, Y, y Z, por la que sea la razón… ¡Sí!

ELG: Ah, esas son palabras sabias. Y, sabes, a menudo cuando unx logra hacer eso—o sea, a desconectar un poco – las cosas que tanto hacían falta hacer, ¡se encuentran como resueltas solitas como por magia!

Marlha: ¡Sí, todo termina bien!

ELG: Ahí estás.

Marlha: ¡En su mayoría! [se ríe]

ELG: Bueno, sí, excepto por cuando no, claro. Pero tan solo somos individuos, y solo podemos hacer lo que podemos. No podemos hacer todo. Y sí, ahí te entiendo. Digo, ¡yo lucho con eso todos los días! Y aprecio mucho, Marlha, tu… la sabiduría que viene a través de tus palabras, y la actitud receptiva, receptiva a… el espacio vacío quizás, o a lo incompleto. Esa es una lección que voy a a sacar de esta entrevista, y que voy a estar, como, digiriendo.

Marlha: Muchas gracias. Esto fue tan divertido.

ELG: Es TAN divertido. Me encanta hacer estas entrevistas. Dios mío. cada una de ellas. Y sí, esta fue una belleza. Gracias, Marlha.

Marlha: Gracias.

¿Quisieran saber más?

En nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, pueden encontrar transcripciones completas en ambas lenguas de cad entrevistaa; nuestro Blog, donde indagamos más en los asuntos históricos, culturales, y políticos que surgen en torno a cada canción; enlaces para oyentes que quisieran investigar un tema más a fondo; y unos imágenes muy chidos. Encontrarán un playlist con todas las canciones de todas las entrevistas hasta la fecha, así como otro playlist elegido por nuestro equipo.

¡Esperamos sus comentarios o preguntas! Contáctennos en nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, o bien pueden participar en la conversación “Si yo fuera” a través de los medios sociales. Estamos en FeisBuk e Instagram. Y, pues, también hay el modo antiguo, de boca en boca. Si les gusta nuestro show, por favor digan a sus amigxs y familiares que lo escuchen. Y por favor, suscríbanse, a través de su plataforma de podcast preferida. Les traeremos una nueva entrevista cada dos semanas, los viernes por la mañana.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, y Wesley McClintock son nuestros soniderxs; Zoë Broussard y Laura Díaz manejan la mercadotecnia; David Castañeda es Investigador de Música; Jen Orenstein traduce las entrevistas entre español e inglés; y Deyaneira García y Alex Dolven facilitan la producción. Somos una entidad sin fines de lucro, actualmente y agradecidamente apoyada por una beca desde la Fundación John Simon Guggenheim, así como fondos desde el Programa de Becas de Facultad de la Universidad de California, Los Angeles, y de la Escuela de Música Herb Alpert en la misma Universidad.

Por ahora, y hasta la próxima entrevista--¡que sigan escuchando unxs a otrxs! Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, y están escuchando, “Si yo fuera una canción.”

English

“Ana Tijoux: the political and the personal” (https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/la-xpm-2012-aug-23-la-et-ms-ana-tijoux-20120824-story.html)


“Ana Tijoux: Addressing Global Unrest in Rhyme” (https://www.npr.org/transcripts/146694189)


“Chilean Musician Ana Tijoux on Politics, Feminism, Motherhood & Hip-Hop as “a Land for the Landless” (https://www.democracynow.org/2014/7/10/ana_tijoux)


“For Ana Tijoux, hip-hop is home” (https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2016/04/for-ana-tijoux-hip-hop-is-home/)


“Chilean Musician Ana Tijoux on Politics, Feminism, Motherhood & Hip-Hop as "a Land for the Landless" (INTERVIEW) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJ3Gr58dpWM)


“The Most Slept-On Indigenous Album of 2014: Ana Tijoux, Vengo” (http://rpm.fm/news/slept-indigenous-album-2014-ana-tijoux-vengo/)


“Ana Tijoux: "El neoliberalismo va a morir en Chile" | Entrevista completa” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sy9DvlM0PhY)


“En La Makinita "Versos Migrantes" Ana Tijoux y Shadia Mansour, Capítulo # 9” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDGsbGHddYU)


Español

“Ana Tijoux: "El neoliberalismo va a morir en Chile" | Entrevista completa” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sy9DvlM0PhY)



“En La Makinita "Versos Migrantes" Ana Tijoux y Shadia Mansour, Capítulo # 9” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDGsbGHddYU)


"Vengo" - Ana Tijoux

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

Vengo

Ana Tijoux

Vengo en busca de respuestas
Con el manojo lleno y las venas abiertas
Vengo como un libro abierto
Anciosa de aprender la historia
No contada de nuestros ancestros
Con el viento que dejaron los abuelos
Y que vive en cada pensamiento
De esta amada tierra

Tierra, quien sabe cuidarlo
Es quien de verdad la quiere
Vengo para mirar de nuevo
Para ver lo' sitios y despertar 

el ojo ciego
Sin miedo, tú y yo
Descolonizemos lo que nos enseñaron
Con nuestro pelo negro, con pómulos marcados
Con el orgullo huido en el alma tatuado

Vengo con la mirada
Vengo con la palabra
Esa palabra hablada
Vengo sin temor a no perder nada
Vengo como el niño que busca de su morada
La entrada al origen, la vuelta de su cruzada
Vengo a buscar la historia silenciada
La historia de una tierra saqueada

Vengo con el mundo y vengo con los pájaros
Vengo con las flores y los árboles, sus cantos
Vengo con el cielo y sus constelaciones
Vengo con el mundo y todas sus estaciones
Vengo agradecida al punto de partida
Vengo con la madera, la montaña y la vida
Vengo con el aire, el agua, la tierra y el fuego
Vengo a mirar el mundo de nuevo

Vengo con mis ideas como escudo
Con el sentir humano a vivir este mundo


Donde el hombre nuevo busca el contrapunto
Vengo, mano
Vengo como tú en busca de la huella, de la pieza del árbol
Y de su corteza que guarda en su memoria que el canto de victoria
Cuando vimos de la tierra lloramos con tal euforia

Ya abrimos así nuestros brazos tan encandilados
Así nos acurrucamos al origen de los tiempos
A la fuente el universo donde yace el sentimiento de vivir este comienzo

Vengo con la sangre roja
Con los pulmones llenos de rimas en mi boca
Con los ojos rasgados, con la tierra en las manos
Venimos con el mundo y venimos con su canto
Vengo a construir un sueño
El brillo de la vida que habita en el hombre nuevo
Vengo buscando un ideal
De un mundo sin clase que se puede levantar

Vengo con el mundo y vengo con los pájaros
Vengo con las flores y los árboles, sus cantos
Vengo con el cielo y sus constelaciones
Vengo con el mundo y todas sus estaciones
Vengo agradecida al punto de partida
Vengo con la madera, la montaña y la vida
Vengo con el aire, el agua, la tierra y el fuego
Vengo a mirar el mundo de nuevo

Vengo
Vengo a mirar el mundo de nuevo
Vengo en busca de respuestas
Con el manojo lleno y las venas abiertas, vengo
Vengo buscando un ideal
De un mundo sin clase que se pueda levantar, vengo
Con nuestro pelo negro, con pómulos marcados
Con el orgullo huido en el alma tatuado

Vengo

Traducción | Translation

Vengo

Ana Tijoux

I Come

Ana Tijoux

I come in search of answers

With a full hand and my veins open

I come like an open book

Anxious to learn the untold story

Of our ancestors

With the wind left by our grandparents

That lives in every thought

Of this beloved land

The one who know how to care for it

Is the one who truly loves it

I come to look again

To see the places and awaken my 

blind eye

No fear, you and I

Let’s decolonize what we were taught

With our black hair, with 

high cheekbones

With pride hidden in a tattooed soul

I come with the look

I come with the word

That word spoken

I come without the fear of losing anything

I come like the child who’s looking for their home

The entrance to the source, the return to their crusade

I come in search of the silenced story

The story of a looted land

I come with the world and I come with the birds

I come with the flowers and the trees, their songs

I come with the sky and its constellations.

I come with the world and all of its seasons

I come in gratitude at the starting point

I come with the wood, the mountain, with life

I come with the air, the water, the earth and the fire

I come to look at the world again

I come with my ideas like a shield

With the feeling of being human and of living in this world


Where the new man looks for a counterpoint

I come, brother

I come like you, looking for the footprint, of the piece of the tree

And its bark that keeps the song of victory

 in its memory

When we saw the earth we cried with that euphoria

We opened our arms feeling so high


That’s how we curled up in the origins of time


At the source of the universe where the feeling of this beginning lies

I come with red blood

With my lungs full of rhymes in my mouth

With my slanted eyes, with the earth in my hands

We come with the world and we come with its song

I come to build a dream

The shine of the life that fills the new man

I come in search of an ideal


Of a world without class that can rise up


I come with the world and I come with the birds

I come with the flowers and the trees, their songs

I come with the sky and its constellations.

I come with the world and all of its seasons

I come in gratitude at the starting point

I come with the wood, the mountain, with life

I come with the air, the water, the earth, and the fire

I come to look at the world again

I come

I come to look at the world again

I come in search of answers

With a full hand and my veins open

I come

I come in search of an ideal

Of a world without class that can rise up

I come

With our black hair, with high cheekbones


With pride hidden in a tattooed soul

I come


"Authors of Forever" - Alicia Keys

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

Authors of Forever

Alicia Keys

 

We are lost and lonely people
And we're looking for a reason and it's alright
So let's celebrate the dreamers
We embrace the space between us, 'cause it's alright

We're all in this boat together
And we're sailing towards the future and it's alright
We can't make the whole thing better
We're the authors of forever and it's alright

We are born on our own
And we die on our own
And we're here to make meaning
Of what happens in between
We could hate, we could love
We could doubt, we could trust
But we're here to make meaning
For as long as we're breathing

and it's alright
Wherever you are, it's alright
Whoever you are, it's alright

If you find love, love like it's the first time
God only knows it will be the last time
If you find love, love like it's the first time
God only-

Where there's light
There must be a shadow
Cloudy skies and rain make a rainbow
We are builders, we are breakers
We are givers, we are takers and it's alright

We are seven billion stories
And we know the faith and glory and it's alright
Alright, ohh

We are born on our own
And we die on our own
And we're here to make meaning
Of what happens in between
We could hate, we could love
We could doubt, we could trust
But we're here to make meaning
For as long as we're breathing

and it's alright
Wherever you are, it's alright
Whoever you are, it's alright
Wherever you are, it's alright, alright

If you find love, love like it's the first time
God only knows it will be the last time
If you find love, love like it's the first time
God only knows-


Traducción | Translation

Autorxs de Para Siempre

Alicia Keys


Somos gente perdida y sola

Estamos buscando una razón y está bien

Entonces celebremos los soñadorxs

Abrazamos el espacio entre nosotrxs porque está bien

Estamos todxs en este barco

Navegando hacia el futuro y está bien

No podemos arreglar todo

Somos los autorex de para siempre y está bien

Nacimos solxs

Y morimos solxs

Y estamos aquí para hacer sentido

de lo que pasa mientras estamos aquí

Podríamos odiar, podríamos ama

Podríamos dudar, podríamos confiar

Pero estamos aquí para hacer sentido

Mientras estamos respirando

Y está bien

Donde sea que estés, está bien

Quien sea que eres, está bien

Si encuentras amor, ama como si fuera la primera vez

Solo Dios sabe será la última vez

Solo Dios-

Donde hay luz

Tiene que haber una sombra

Cielos nublados hacen arco iris

Somos lxs que construyen, lxs que rompen

Lxs que dan y lxs que reciben y está bien

Somos siete mil millones de historias

Conocemos la fé y la gloria y está bien

Está bien ohh

Nacimos solxs

Y morimos solxs

Y estamos aquí para hacer sentido

de lo que pasa mientras estamos aquí

Podríamos odiar, podríamos ama

Podríamos dudar, podríamos confiar

Pero estamos aquí para hacer sentido

Mientras estamos respirando

Y está bien

Donde sea que estés, está bien

Quien sea que eres, está bien

Si encuentras amor, ama como si fuera la primera vez

Solo Dios sabe será la última vez

Solo Dios-



Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language
Traducción | Translation