Episodio / Episode #
15
October 8, 2021

Laura Pantoja

English

Español

English

Greetings and welcome to the latest episode of “Si yo fuera una canción”  -- “If I Were a Song.” We are a community-based podcast and radio show, in which people of Santa Ana, California, tell us in their own words about the music that means the most to them.


ELG: I am Elisabeth Le Guin, your program host, and Director of this project.

This project is based on my conviction that we people in the modern world need to learn to listen to one another; and that music, and all it brings us, is the perfect place to begin.



DAVID: My name is David Castañeda, music researcher here for the SYFUC podcast. I am so happy to be a part of this project, using my scholarly training and my performance experience to bring you the stories, music, and lived experiences of those living right here in Santa Ana.

ELG: I met Laura Pantoja when I first started coming to events at El Centro Cultural de México. For a long time she intimidated me: she was the lady who sat in all the important meetings, arms crossed over her chest and an ironic smile on her lips. She seemed to know mucho more than I did about everything.

Years have gone by, and Laura no longer intimidates me. The warm heart has made itself known to me, even as I have retained a healthy respect for her sharp intellect and for her critical judgment. 

In today’s interview we get a glimpse of where all that got started, and we talk a little bit about where it might be headed, too.


ELG: Welcome, Laura. It's a great honor to have you here on the line recording an interview. After over a year of doing this podcast, I finally get to interview you, and I'm very excited. I'd like you to introduce yourself to the audience, to the listeners. Tell them a bit about yourself, like your full name, your profession, what you do in life – whatever you feel is important to tell us about what you do in life. How did you come to be in Santa Ana? Things like that, if you will.


Laura Pantoja: Well, good afternoon, Elisabeth. It's a pleasure for me as well, to be on your program, your podcast, which I love. And so… My name is Laura Pantoja, I'm from Mexico, from Mexico City. I'm about to turn 61 years old and I’ve been living in Santa Ana, California for over 25 years. And I'm a community organizer. I've been doing that for many years. I began very young back in Mexico. That's what I do. And I came… How did I end up in Santa Ana? I always tell my girlfriends that someone put a curse on me on the airplane when I came to California to visit my siblings, because I ended up staying, right?


I was just coming for a vacation, like thousands of migrants, nothing more. We come here for a while and we end up staying here. I went to live in a city called Orange. I was there for about 10 years, and after that I came here to Santa Ana. But almost all of my work, or, actually, all of my work has always been here in Santa Ana ,and it's always been, I don't know why, but in the center of Santa Ana, in the Downtown, as they call it. I've always, always worked in that area.



ELG: Mmhmm, mmhmm. And what type of work is there for a professional organizer?



Laura Pantoja: I’m not sure if there is an organizer ‘profession’.


ELG: [Both laugh] I think so.


Laura Pantoja: There should be a University of Organizers, I think, that –



ELG: [laughs] Yeah, yeah, like a Bachelor’s of Organizing.


Laura Pantoja:  So, when I was very young, in Mexico, I grew up in Mexico City and… I remember that when I started high school, I went to a school called the Colegio de Ciencias y Humanidades (the School of Sciences and Humanities). And on the first day of classes, some kids came who’d been rejected by the university. The Colegio de Ciencias y Humanidades was part of the  UNAM (the Autonomous University of Mexico). And they came, and they hadn’t gotten in. There were a lot of them, 50 or 60 young people who wanted to register, and to me it seemed like an injustice. I was, like, fifteen years old. And that day they went out to protest and talk with the people, and, I don’t know why, but I went with them.



ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: I think that was where I started to get involved with things that were happening around me, you know? In the community. And  so, I was in Mexico for many years. I also worked on creating a cooperative in a place called Cholula, in Puebla, Mexico.


ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: And I learned there and… I have to laugh at myself. I remember well, I was very young, about 19 years old, and I showed up with all the arrogance of youth, thinking I was going to organize the Campesinos, the local peasants. But it was the other way around, the Campesinos wound up organizing me.



ELG: Oh, of course, of course.


Laura Pantoja: So, I’ve had a really great schooling, I’ve had many experiences of working with the people. Which are the same as my people. When I was working in that community in Cholula, well, I said to myself “This family could be my dad, my mom, my aunts and uncles, right?”


ELG: Mmmm.


Laura Pantoja: Because my family comes from the countryside, my grandfather and great-grandfather were ejidatarios, that is, co-owners of communal lands. And so they were Campesinos.


ELG: Uh-huh.


Laura Pantoja: Unfortunately, my [aunts and] uncles had to emigrate to the United States because of the [poor] economy. And my grandparents’ land wasn't enough to maintain them. And that's how people came [to the city] and disappeared from agricultural communities, right?


ELG: Yeah.


Laura Pantoja: So, I felt very comfortable with the people because I felt like I was with my family. It was never hard for me. And when I came to the United States, well… there was a newspaper published by an organization called—the organization was called Hermandad Mexicana (Mexican brotherhood), and they ran a free newspaper in Spanish, called "La Unión Hispana." (The Hispanic Union). And I went and said [to myself], “Hey, why don’t you help them out?” So I started helping them and I worked there for a while, writing articles and reporting.  And that was how I went about joining the community and getting to know people and understand a bit more about how things worked in Santa Ana, and what it meant to be a migrant in the United States, you know? What the laws were that criminalized the youth and migrant families for not having documents, right? So, I’m telling you, I became an organizer to serve the community. It’s the community that teaches me everything that must be done.


ELG: Yeah, yeah. So, community organizing is really your true calling? [but] not necessarily how you pay the rent.



Laura Pantoja: I’ll tell you, I worked a long time for the newspaper, and then I worked at the Consulate. I worked for many years at the Mexican Consulate, until they fired me! [both laugh] I’ll never forget it… It was an injustice, like all lay-offs—



ELG: Oh dear…


Laura Pantoja: -- And then I started working for an organization called Latino Health Access that hired community health workers, people that live in the community and are also experts on the issues that happen there, And I’m working there now, in the Community Outreach and Advocacy department.



ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: But I always say that something that marked me for life, and is the reason I’ve been here so long, was being a volunteer at an organization called El Centro Cultural de México.


ELG: Of course, of course.


Laura Pantoja:  I think that we’ve all been touched by that organization in some way. And I think that this space is so important to me because it gave me a sense of belonging.



ELG: Exactly.


Laura Pantoja: And that’s really important for all human beings… So because of that, I belong to the community of Santa Ana, because I began getting involved in cultural activities and from there things emerged that had to do with our lives, right? The lives of migrants. And as they say at the Centro, culture is political too, right?



ELG: Yes, Exactly.


Laura Pantoja: When we began making Posadas or the Noche de Altares, these things were a political act, right? Going out and singing and pidiendo posada in the street, well that’s practically revolutionary, you could say.


ELG: Well, yes, of course El Centro Cultural de México has been sort of a recurring theme in these interviews, because I met a lot of our interviewees through the Centro. Just like you and me, right? I met you through the Centro. And I very much agree that the feeling of belonging is fundamental for any human being. And funnily, in my case, as I don’t have any Latinx heritage at all, and Spanish is my second language… I’ve found that same sense of belonging, of comfort and of an integrity between the cultural and political at the Centro. Which, well, was in fact the reason I moved to Santa Ana. So, yeah—a little promo for the Centro. [laughs]

___________________________________


INSERT #1- CCM + pedir posada 


ELG: As I mention in the interview, the Centro Cultural de México has been a touchstone for many of my interviewees, as well as for me personally. Some time back, in Episode #3, when I interviewed Luis Sarmiento, I presented El Centro as a fundamental community resource for many Spanish-speaking residents of Santa Ana.

Like many small non-profits, El Centro was hit hard by the pandemic. Nevertheless it has continued to offer economic help to undocumented residents of the area, vaccine clinics, and for a time, a place to pitch a tent in its parking lots, for unhoused people who had no other options. It is to be hoped that in coming months, El Centro can re-open its doors to the community anew, to once again offer its rich range of cultural programs and classes.

Among these, the best-known has been the Noche de Altares, “Night of Altars,” that Laura mentions. This event takes place around the 2nd of November, Day of the Dead, when families and organizations in the area build altars to their dead throughout the whole center of the city. These altars are a moving testimony to the memories of lost loved ones, as well as to the creative richness of Mexican traditional arts.

Laura also mentions “pidiendo posada,” or “asking for shelter.” This is an old Christmastime ritual in which a group walks through the streets singing and carrying a decorated tree branch. At the end they arrive at a house or church where a second group awaits them, and a sung interchange ensues that recreates the search for a shelter in which the Virgin Mary could give birth. Finally, the second group admits the first, and everyone has a party with punch and traditional treats.

Laura comments that in Santa Ana a generation ago, doing something like this was “almost revolutionary,” for the way it brought dramatic ritual to the streets of a suburban community. Even now it has radical resonances, for those same suburban streets are now inhabited by the many unhoused people who spend their days literally asking for shelter.

___________________


ELG: All right, let's move on to the songs you've chosen for the interview. And this time, it's a little bit different than past interviews, we have three songs, two of which represent various aspects of your origins, or your roots.


Laura Pantoja: My mom is from, she was from the state of Jalisco. And my mom always liked to sing. She wasn't bad at it, she could hold a tune. And she always sang to us. But, I don’t know why, but we always make mental associations… she sang a song by Tito Guízar, called “En el rancho grande,“ that is, “On the big ranch”. -- “Over where I lived/there was a rancher lady/who happily told me/I’m going to make you your underwear/like the ranchers wear/I’ll start them with wool/and I’ll finish them with leather” And she always sang [that] to us since we were very little. So, my mom comes [to mind], I guess because she liked Tito Guízar, who acted in movies, right? He has a song called "Allá en el rancho grande" (Over on the big ranch)  and a lot of movies. I think they were movies my mom watched when she was young, and the songs, well my mom really liked to sing that song and I always associate it with my childhood, because my mom wasn’t an urban woman, she was a rural woman.


ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: But since we grew up in Mexico City, we'd listen to the radio in the mornings before school. We'd turn on the radio, you know? We had a television, but in those days we listened more to the radio. And Cri Cri's show was on in the morning, so the kids would get up and sing the songs. And I remember well, the song “La patita”. “The little duck.” I associate that one with my mom a lot as well because it goes: “The little duck goes to market/with her polka dot shawl/she comes back home/and her ducklings say to her/what did you bring me, Mama?/quack quack what did you bring me? Cuara quack quack!” -- Well, that’s what we were like when our mom would come home from the store, --“What did you bring me?” Right? 


ELG: Yes, yes! [laughing] Let’s go to the … to the song by Tito Guízar.

___________________________________


INSERT #2 – Tito Guízar – ELG Only


Mid-20th-century Mexico seems to have had an endless supply of impossibly handsome male actor-singers with impossibly gorgeous voices:  Pedro Infante, Pedro Vargas, Javier Solís, Jorge Negrete, Pepe Guízar…Tito Guízar was first cousin to Pepe. His given name was Federico; he took the nickname “Tito” in honor of his voice teacher, the Italian operatic tenor Tito Schipa, and he had a modest operatic career in addition to becoming a film star and popular singer. His classical training gave him what may be the most beautifully modulated and controlled voice in a very strong field of contenders.


___________________



MUSIC CLIP #1: 

Tito Guízar- “Allá en el rancho grande”


ELG: What a great way to start the day!



Laura Pantoja: Right? My mom really liked that… That song reminds me a lot of her.



ELG: Yeah, of course, of course, And something I learned while preparing for this interview is that there are many recordings of this song, of course, by various famous artists, Tito Guízar among them, but each one is a little different. There’s a ton of verses --


Laura Pantoja: Yes!


ELG: -- of the song. And [the artists] choose their own verses to create, in each case, a slightly different variation of the song. I imagine that your mom did the same thing, like, choosing the verses that were most fitting for the moment.


Laura Pantoja: Yes, that’s why I told you about that verse “I’m going to make you your underwear” that I remember. [laughs]


ELG: Mm, yeah.


Laura Pantoja: There’s something [to it] that grabbed my attention as a girl, you know? I imagined that clothing worn by cowboys, people that rode on horseback.


ELG: Yes, of course… yeah, and being a city girl, imagining a bit of country life, village life. So, we could say, that song was doing a bit of intercultural work, no? 



Laura Pantoja: Mm-hm.


ELG: Very interesting, that phenomenon of migration from the country to Mexico City, like a, almost like a… A whirlwind of migration. And so, so many were arriving at that time.


Laura Pantoja: Yes, in that era when there was a lot of work in Mexico, in Mexico City, a lot of people emigrated to the big cities in search of opportunity, right?


ELG: Mm-hm.

_________________________________

INSERT #3 - Migration to Mexico City


DC: The family histories that Laura shares are anecdotal evidence of a grand historical movement that is very important in Mexican history. In the 1950s and 60s, the “Metropolitan Zone of Mexico City,” which is the term that includes not only Mexico City proper, but also Mexico State and all contiguous communities, saw the greatest annual rate of internal immigration in its long history. This was precisely the period in which Laura’s parents arrived there from Jalisco. In that period, the population of the Zone effectively doubled, and more: from some 3 million people to almost 7 million. As Laura says, the most common reason for the flight from the provinces was economic. Over time, capitalism in Mexico has had a disastrous effect on country and small-town life.



Internal migration in Mexico has never stopped. According to the 2020 Census, the Metropolitan Zone of Mexico City today consists of 22 million human souls.


___________________


Laura Pantoja: And… and funnily, my mom and dad are from nearby places, but they met in Mexico City. They even had friends in common [back home].


ELG: Ha!


Laura Pantoja: When they got married, my mom said that people laughed at her for the way she talked. For example, those bread rolls that are called "bolillos”, in Mexico City, in the streets of Jalisco, are called “birotes”, right? My mom arrived, she would give me birotes and everyone made a face like, “what?” [cackles]


ELG: hahaha!


Laura Pantoja: “What is that?”


ELG: Of course. [laughing]


Laura Pantoja: So, those things. You know, speaking of coincidences, or… My mom was a migrant in Mexico City, and so was my dad. And we are -- my brother and I who live in the United States – we’re migrants in this country. And so, when I spoke about my mom, I said how tough it had been for her, being a migrant in Mexico City. And I remember that my mom was just waiting for the day… For classes to finish, and the next day we’d go to her village to spend the summer.



ELG: Mmm.


Laura Pantoja: And it was really lovely because there was water, canals, fields. It was a place where, as a child, you could wander. We were city kids, my mom wouldn’t let us go out, you know? But in my mom’s village I could go anywhere, because everyone knew me and they’d invite us to eat. So, I remember that during our vacations I’d never see our mom and dad until it was time to go to bed.



ELG: [laughs] Yeah.


Laura Pantoja: And it was really great, right? It was very fun.


ELG: Yeahhh, all the kids at ease all day long, exploring the area in perfect safety, right?


Laura Pantoja: Yes.


ELG: It’s like paradise. A kind of paradise.



Laura Pantoja: Yes… and you know I’ve really liked to read ever since… I started reading very young. I'd read anything I could get my hands on. And I remember that in the village there was… I don't remember whose house it was, but I liked to go to this one house because in the small towns they have the custom of leaving the doors and windows open—and you've seen those corridors right? With flowerpots full of ferns and plants and all fresh green?


ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: I don’t know if it was my aunt, or a distant cousin, but under her bed she had a wooden box with all the… Those drugstore-type novels, or, little comic books, called "Lágrimas y risas.", or, “Tears and laughter”. They told the stories that later got made into telenovelas, right? [ELG laughs] For example "El pecado de Oyuki.", or “Oyuki’s sin.” But anyway, she had the whole collection. So, I’d spend part of my vacation getting up-to-date with everything in her collection.


ELG: Yeah, yeah. Oh, how fun! How wonderful! I remember, in my childhood in the state of Oregon, well, every week when we’d go to the market, we were allowed to pick out a comic, something like that, to read for the week. And I loved, loved that…


Laura Pantoja: And that encourages you to love reading, right? I always say that that’s where I got my reading vice.


ELG: Mm Hm. Haha, "vice!" Yes, it's a great vice to have, right?… 

_____________________________________


INSERT #4 - “Lágrimas y risas” 


ELG: "Lágrimas, risas y amor" -- "Tears, laughter and love" -- was a historieta, which is to say, a comic book, of long life and wide cultural influence in Mexico. It was published for 32 years between 1962 and 1994. It offered episodic stories about dramatic and sentimental themes, with sketches in sepia. Various [of them] were turned into telenovelas. The series that Laura mentions, "Oyuki's Sin,” became one of the most successful sequences in the history of the magazine, and it was converted into a telenovela in 1988. I emphasize this popular medium here for the reasons that Laura expresses: for various generations that are now mature people, this taste for these humble magazines -- they have no literary prestige at all -- led us to become serious readers for our entire lives. That's how it was for Laura. That's how it has been for me. In my English speaking case, the historietas were -- that is, comics -- were those of Marvel Comics, with fantastic and romantic stories about heroes, and from time to time, a heroine.

___________________


ELG: Well, okay, so, moving on the the second of your first two songs. Ah, so…the figure of Cri Cri, in a certain sense he's a comic figure, but in truth, he was a man that sang and had, as I understand it, a radio show. Tell us a bit about how you got to know his music, and the role it played in your childhood.



Laura Pantoja: Alright, I liked it a lot, especially because, like, you’d wake up to Cri Cri’s songs, right? But Cri Cri’s songs were also like stories.



ELG: Yeah.


Laura Pantoja: First, his character is the singing cricket, and his program had a theme song that went like this: “Who’s that over there?/ It’s Cri Cri/ Cri Cri, the singing cricket”. 



MUSIC CLIP #2: 

Cri Cri audio signature


Laura Pantoja: -- And so, you knew the program was starting. So, he’d tell you the story, the song about the three little pigs, or the little duck that goes to market, or the ugly doll, or the one about the grandmother. So, they were stories, you know? But I think the good thing for those of us who listened to Cri Cri – his name was Gabilondo Soler. And he was a musician, right? He knew about music. So, he’d teach you real rhythms. His songs have [the rhythms of] chachacha, of jazz, of the blues. I feel like he gave you a certain musical education, [a sense of] rhythm and of taste, right?


ELG: Ahah.


Laura Pantoja: So, he contributed a lot. If you have the opportunity to listen closely to Cri Cri, you’ll find all those rhythms from Veracruz, from the north… El ratón vaquero, right? Do you know El ratón vaquero? “The cowboy mouse.” The story, that he got out his pistols…Imagine a child, you’re listening to the songs, but, well, you’re imagining the stories. I would picture the duck with her shawl, but I’d also associate it with my mom arriving home from market and us asking her “what did you bring me?” You know? [ELG laughs] We’d ask my mom that! So, I think he contributed a lot to musical taste and the upbringing of generations. Mothers in Mexico still play Cri Cri for their children.



ELG: Uh-huh.


Laura Pantoja: And there are other singers now, right? But Cri Cri is practially a Mexican  icon. 


ELG: Well, it also seems to me that, besides contributing to the appreciation of music, of regional music and everything else, I think there’s an element, in various songs of his, there’s an element of social critique that surprised me, like, a lot. And I’m going to suggest that we listen to the song, because this song has like a… a twist ending. It has an unexpected twist at the end. And it made ma, it made me laugh until I cried! – So let’s listen to “La patita.”


__________________________________

MUSIC CLIP #2, “Cri Cri, “La patita” 

__________________________________



ELG: Well, I’ll tell you, I’ve never heard a children’s song with an ending like that. The song has such an innocent and light tone, you know? And then, at the end, he goes into a pretty sharp little social critique, right?


Laura Pantoja: Mm-hm.


ELG: Here’s a translation of the end of the song:

Her ducklings

are growing and they don’t have shoes,

and her husband 

is a lazy shameless duck

who doesn’t earn anything so they can eat

and the little duck, well what’s she going to do?

When they ask her, she’ll answer,

“Eat flies! cuara quack quack!”


 -- I understand this is not an isolated example in Cri Cri’s repertoire.


Laura Pantoja: I think that as a social critique he was thinking, for example, that everything at the market is very expensive, I think that the mothers identified with that—


ELG: Yes, of course!


Laura Pantoja: -- with that, and with having so many children, but there’s nothing to feed them today. Well, so, “Eat flies”. Same with the song  “The Ugly doll”, right? It talks a bit about being different, right? About respecting our differences. It’s a good point, eh? Someone should write a thesis. [cackles]  


ELG: Haha. That's it.


_____________________________________


INSERT #5 - Gabilondo Soler and Cri Cri 


NOTE: This is not a translation but an improvised dialogue that discusses the same themes in each language. 



ELG: Cri Cri!


DC: Cri Cri.


ELG: This guy! You know, there actually are doctoral theses about him.


DC: Wow.


ELG: I found a couple, and a couple of, like, undergraduate theses about him. So he has gotten academic and scholarly attention, and most of it is in the last 20 years.  I think there's been a kind of a turnaround in how scholars regard things like children's art and children's music. They're starting to get the respect they deserve as as literature, and as real music, real art.


DC: Mm hmm.


ELG: And, yeah, I think Cri Cri is just a wonderful kind of poster child for this, for why we should take children's art and children's music really seriously. As I understand it, he himself had some doubt about going into this as a career. He was a musician, a pianist, a singer, a composer, and he got involved with the radio, the early days of national radio in Mexico. And somebody there suggested to him, "Hey, you know, we're trying to find a host for this children's show." And he was none too sure! Because back in that day, children's art really got no respect at all.

DC: Right.


ELG: But he went for it, and I think pretty quickly he got a sense of what the possibilities were here, real artistic possibilities and real possibilities of making complex and subtle and delightful communications that really matter in the world. And Laura points this out, you know, she says it's it's what we hear when we're really young, it's what we hear in our family. You know, that's going to be with us for the rest of our lives.


DC: Mm hmm. Mm hmm.


ELG: So, there are 215 songs --


DC: Wow!


ELG: -- by Gabilondo Soler, Cri Cri. So a lot to choose from here. But we've got this one that she brought forward for us. What do you notice there, David?


DC: The quality of the music is just so high! You know, it's just, the musicianship is there. This is a live orchestra. This is a full orchestra. I mean, playing, really playing. You know, this, it's just fantastic music. There's no two ways about it.


ELG: Yeah. Yeah, and then the singing and the patter, the way he brings the characters in…This was radio, it was primarily radio, coming into people's houses on the "Cri Cri" program at 7:15 every morning.


DC: Wow.


ELG: I don't know, did you grow up listening to radio shows or... or for that matter, television, which is probably more in tune with with your generation?


DC: It was television. It was during the 90s, and unfortunately, this kind of stuff didn't exist any more by the time I was coming up, so when I was little, that my exposure to this type of music and this kind of program was when my dad, who -- he was born in ‘57 in Guatemala -- he would then kind of share it with me, "Oh, well, have you seen Tom and Jerry? Oh, have you seen, you know, this such and such show," which had music like this, what we would call old school cartoons that I, you know, as a musician now, I really, really appreciate and I really enjoy for the reasons that we're saying, you know, their artistic quality, the caliber of art that was being shared with people was just so high. 

I don't even know what cartoons they got going on now, SpongeBob... It just doesn't, it doesn't have the same... It's not the same.


ELG: Yeah, something that is really artistically put together, I think kids really do respond to it differently and perhaps more profoundly…. 

The thing that really grabbed me with “La Patita is the ending. 

He was not afraid to go there and be really pretty satirical in his songs for children. Which is something I think... Satire is a great teacher, right?


DC: Yep. Yes.


ELG: [It] teaches, you know, values, everything in a nice little package. Plus, it's funny. And Laura briefly mentions “El Ratón Vaquero,” the cowboy mouse, which is another Cri Cri song, very well known. I think it's kind of iconic. The story of the cowboy mouse is that he's a USAmerican. He is the stereotype of the macho cowboy, except he's a mouse! [laughs] And he's in a Mexican jail, and he's very upset about this. And he keeps shooting off his pistols and talking in English to his jailers and saying, "Let me out, I don't belong in here." And his jailers are like, "Uh-uhh. You earned your way in here. You're in here to stay. Sorry, guy!"


DC: Oh, no! [both laugh]

____________________________

INSERT MUSIC CLIP: Cri Cri -“El ratón vaquero”

_______________________________


ELG: It's just such an amazing, little satirical sketch of... it's like international relations in a children's song,


DC: Mm hmm. Mm hmm.


ELG: You know, American machismo, and the Mexicans, just like, "Uh-uh, you screwed up. You're in jail."


DC: Why was he in jail?


ELG: It never says!


DC: [laughs] All right, even better. Okay. All right. [both laugh]


ELG: That's right.

___________________


ELG: Alright, well, if not a thesis, it's worth thinking about a bit, because the act of awakening the social conscience is something that begins with the family, right? The sense of fairness, that is the motor for activism, and the motor for, well the work of community organizing that you do, for example. It’s something very worthwhile to think about, I think: How can musicians and those who work in children’s music, how can they help children to develop a social conscience, a conscience about what's fair, and the rights they really have?


Laura Pantoja: It has a lot to do with values, right? [Or,] a bit about the values, but [more] the actions of their parents, right?


ELG: That’s it. Yes.


Laura Pantoja: One thing is what they tell you, and another thing is what people actually do in their lives. And when you’re a child, you pay a lot of attention to that. So, you also have to see how, how your parents act around people in need, or in moments of injustice, right?


ELG: That’s true.


Laura Pantoja: So, it’s like, you’re unconsciously taking notes, right? Of the things that aren’t shared fairly in the world, right? – I remember Día de los Reyes (Three Kings’ Day) in Mexico very well. I lived on a working-class street, but there were people who were teachers, government officials, you know? And there were people with  fewer resources. And I remember that holiday well. Well, some kids would go out with their brand-new cars or bikes, their big dolls. But there were a lot of kids that didn’t have anything. There was someone with a bag of marbles, that bag of marbles was enough, because they had something new, a new toy. But, yes, there were kids that just watched the others, and to me that was awful. I remember it well.


ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: It seemed unfair to me. So, there’s a good reason for a kid to hear talk in the house, that parents talk about injustices.   


ELG: These things start very early in life, I think. And, okay, the question is, how do we bring that forward and what type of life can we build with respect to injustices, the things we observe, right?


Laura Pantoja: Yes, what we hear, what we see, what we read, it’s all part of it. We’re a product of all that, right?


ELG: That's true. Mm-hmm. Well, that's a good turning point for us to shift our attention to the third song, the one you chose that expresses or represents your hopes for the future. And… it's a super interesting selection. I think I'd like to listen to the song you chose by Silvio Rodríguez, "La maza," and then we’ll discuss it.


Laura Pantoja: Go ahead.

_________________________________+

MUSIC CLIP #3, Silvio Rodríguez “La maza”

_________________________________


ELG: Oof!


Laura Pantoja: This song always makes me cry.


ELG: Of course, yeah. It’s powerful…


Laura Pantoja: I really like it for its substance and values, it’s like a philosophical song, right?


ELG: Super philosophical.


Laura Pantoja: The meaning of life and of what keeps you going, right? Or, what’s the reason? I think it’s a lot like life.


ELG: [cackles] Well it’s a lot, it’s a lot like life, because the whole song is organized around a question that never gets answered. Just like life!


Laura Pantoja:  For me, it’s a pure song, it reminds me of things I believed and keep believing, you know? And that’s what maintain me and keeps me going, doing the things I like.


ELG: But to me, it's a sign of a certain, let’s say, spiritual maturity, to have this list of values, of things to believe in in life, but, just in the form of a question. He never answers it! The whole song is in the subjunctive and he never answers his own question. And he won't answer it. 

And it's… that's like the principal of hope, like the foundation of hope in life, to me it seems really, really deep, because it isn't easy to base your faith to keep going in life, on uncertainty .[laughs]


Laura Pantoja: Of course, well that’s how life is, right? Uncertain.


ELG: That’s right, but the act of learning how to trust in the uncertainty is, it’s a lifelong learning, right? We are constantly messing that up. Or at least, I mess it up.


Laura Pantoja: We all get discouraged and lose our way.


ELG: Yes!


Laura Pantoja: We feel alone in the universe… These lyrics, these songs, every time I listen to them, they make me cry, but they make me feel happy. It’s a contradiction, right?


ELG: Well, the thing is, we have company on the path. Silvio Rodriguez himself keeps us company, on this path that at times can be very difficult. With company, everything is possible.


Laura Pantoja: It’s less difficult, right? Sure, because you’re you, right, with your own contradictions, your own conversations, your silences and everything else. That’s why the sense of belonging and making a community is something that maintains you, right? A lot of that comes from the spaces we’ve helped to create. You too, Elisabeth, right? Surely at the Centro, in son jarocho, in what you do at your school, right?


ELG: Mm-hmm.


Laura Pantoja: It keeps us alive, and with the hope that makes our eyes shine, right? And I think it’s something to always be grateful for, that support the universe sent us to be here today and to keep on creating… I don’t know who’s supporting us, but it’s got to be someone out there in the universe, right?

ELG: What a great way to put it, yeah. And, okay, going back to the song for a bit, one thing that really gets my attention, and truly grabs my heart, is not only the lyrics but also the music Silvio Rodríguez uses. The music itself, in its own way, speaks to this, because it uses a harmonic loop, a series of chords in the song, that never closes. It repeats and repeats and repeats, but never rests. So the notes, the tones themselves express this sense of searching, you could say. And –

Laura Pantoja: And of power, no? I mean, the intensity is growing, right? That “what would, what would, what would it be…”

Right?


ELG: [cackles] That’s right.


Laura Pantoja: And all that about the harmonies, and everything, that’s from the point of view of an expert, right? 


ELG: Well, yes, but I didn’t mention it as a way of boasting about myself, about my knowledge…It’s that, yeah, it catches my attention, because those effects that singer-songwriters use in their music affect us a lot. They affect us on a different level than the words. And the words, yes, we can talk about the lyrics a lot. But the music also contributes a very important element that’s very powerful.


Laura Pantoja: Like when he plays, I don’t know what instrument it is, a drum. He plays boom, boom, boom. Like, that’s powerful, right? I really like that part.


ELG: Yes, me too.

_______________

INSERT #6 - Silvio Rodríguez 

NOTE: This is not a translation but an improvised dialogue that discusses the same themes in each language. 

DC: Okay, so here we have one of the, perhaps one of the most well-known and -studied artists of all, I'm going to say all Latin America, Silvio Rodriguez, which is just such an icon. If we're going to talk about what I like to call "Pan Latin American music," that's music that has gone from one place in Latin America and really has made an impact all over Latin America and the world, Silvio is one of them, for sure. What do you think, Elisabeth?


ELG: I was just going to say... So living here in Santa Ana, in a community that is... There are very few Cubanxs here. Mostly Mexican, Central American immigrants. And yeah, Silvio is huge. He's huge. So yeah, that's kind of a case in point.


DC: Yeah, Silvio. For those who might be unfamiliar, has made a career in a name for himself doing what we call today, music called Nueva Trova. So Nueva Trova music is kind of an analogue in some ways to American singer-songwriter music of, like, the Sixties, right? Where the poetry and the lyrics were very much conscious, lots of social and political critique. This music, Nueva Trova actually had has its roots in an older music called Trova music, which was music made by traveling musicians on the island of Cuba beginning in the Oriente province. And they would go basically from town to town, but usually on a guitar and singing these -- primarily love songs, but it started around the 60s, after the Revolution, to become Nueva Trova as the lyrics became more politically and socially conscious.


ELG: Wow, you know what occurs to me, David, is… so "trova," the word makes me think of the troubadours, which were a European phenomenon, hundreds of years ago, the traveling musician who went from town to town, court to court sharing their art…And it just brings to mind something -- I mentioned this briefly in Laura's interview:  the harmonies of the song, a harmonic cycle that goes over and over and over, and the whole song is based on it. Let's listen to it briefly here as as it is heard in "La maza." So here goes. 

_____________________________________

INSERT MUSIC CLIP:  

Silvio Rodríguez “La maza” 2:05-2:35

____________________________________


ELG: And then I just want to play right next to it, something else... 

_____________________________________

INSERT MUSIC CLIP

“Lamento della ninfa,” very opening

 

ELG. "Lamento della Ninfa" of Claudio Monteverdi, from 1638. I think you can hear that? That there is this commonality between these two songs, roughly 400 years apart. It supports your point about the Nueva Trova.


DC: And it's so cool to see how, you know, these musical techniques, and music in general, just always is building upon itself, and it can happen in many different places across many different times, right? And it's to me, it's a testament of, you know, humans being humans, humans listening to each other and being inspired by one another across centuries.


ELG: Yeah, yeah, that's wonderful

_______________


ELG: Yeah, well, it’s… I think it’s a good choice, a very special choice you’ve made, because it leaves open the question of where we’re going [laughs] and why, and what for.


Laura Pantoja: What we believe, right? That can be expressed in many ways. Like you said. And I’ll tell you, almost every time I hear it, it really moves many things in my heart, right? It’s like what they say, that we’re the product of the place we were born, of history, the economy, and maybe we’re the product of music [too], right? Part of a loving upbringing, and all types of upbringing, have to do with the music we got to hear and live [with]. 


ELG: Yes. And that’s what this podcast is all about! [laughs] Because music opens doors between people and between – between  hearts, right?  


Laura Pantoja: Yes, it enriches our lives.


ELG: Yeah… Well, this seems like a great point on which to close the interview, because, I don’t know how to go on further from this philosophical, but lovely point we’ve arrived at!


Laura Pantoja: Thank you for all of this effort, to tell stories through the music of the people around you. It’s a good way to contribute to the world, right?



ELG: I hope so. To me… Well, I enjoy an enormous privilege, of getting to hear the music of people I know, and in some cases of people who are new to me, and through that I find a broader, deeper sense of an entire, very special community, which is the community of Santa Ana. So, I’m very grateful for the opportunity. Really.


Laura Pantoja:  It’s been a pleasure, eh? Truly.


ELG: Yes, a great pleasure, thank you.


Laura Pantoja: You brought me to many places from my life. [cackles]


ELG: [laughs] How lovely. It’s a privilege for me.


Laura Pantoja: Take care, I’ve got to go to another meeting. I have another meeting.


ELG:  Very good, very good. I’ll see you soon.


Laura Pantoja: All right, bye.


ELG: Ciao.


Would you like to know more? 


On our website at siyofuera.org, you can find complete transcripts in both languages of every interview, our Blog about the issues of history, culture, and politics that come up around every song, links for listeners who might want to pursue a theme further, and some very cool imagery. You’ll find playlists of all the songs from all the interviews to date, and our special Staff-curated playlist as well.

We invite your comments or questions! Contact us at our website or participate in the Si Yo Fuera conversation on social media. We’re out there on FaceBook and Instagram. And then there’s just plain old word of mouth. If you like our show, do please tell your friends to give it a listen. And do please subscribe, on any of the major podcast platforms. We’ll bring a new interview for you, every two weeks on Friday mornings.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, and Wesley McClintock are our sound engineers; Zoë Broussard and Laura Díaz hold down the marketing; David Castañeda is Music Researcher; Jen Orenstein translates interviews to and from Spanish; Deyaneira García and Alex Dolven make production possible. We are a not-for-profit venture, currently and gratefully funded by the John Paul Simon Guggenheim Foundation, UCLA’s Faculty Grants Program, and the Herb Alpert School of Music.

For now, and until the next interview—keep listening to one another! 

I’m Elisabeth Le Guin, and this is, “Si yo fuera una canción -- If I were a song…”


Español

Saludos y bienvenidxs al episodio más reciente de “Si yo fuera una canción.” Somos un podcast y programa de radio, en donde la gente de Santa Ana, California nos cuenta en sus propias palabras, de las músicas que más le importan.


ELG: Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, la anfitriona del programa, y Directora del proyecto.

Este proyecto se basa en mi convicción que nosotrxs, la gente del mundo moderno, necesitamos aprender a mejor escucharnos; y que la música, con todo lo que nos conlleva, es el lugar perfecto para empezar.


DAVID: Mi nombre es David Castañeda, investigador de música aquí en el podcast SYFUC. Estoy muy feliz de ser parte de este proyecto, utilizando mi entrenamiento académico y mi experiencia profesional como músico, para traerles las historias, la música y las experiencias vividas de quienes viven aquí en Santa Ana.

ELG: Conocí a Laura Pantoja cuando empecé a venir a los eventos en el Centro Cultural de México. Durante largo tiempo, me encontraba intimidada: ella era la señora que asistía todas las reuniones importantes, con los brazos cruzados ante el pecho y una sonrisa irónica en los labios. Me parecía que sabía mucho más que yo.

Han pasado varios años y con ellas, la intimidación. El corazón cálido de Laura se me ha revelado, aunque mantengo un respeto robusto por su intelecto agudo y su juicio crítico.

En la entrevista de hoy, vislumbramos algo de los orígenes de todo eso; y platicamos un poco sobre adónde se dirige, también.

ELG: Pues bienvenida, Laura. Es un gran honor, tenerte aquí en la línea grabando una entrevista. Después de más de un año de actividad en este podcast, por fin, llego a entrevistar a ti, y estoy emocionada. Y me gustaría si te presentaras a la audiencia, a los oyentes un poco, como con tu nombre completo, tu oficio, lo que haces en la vida -- lo que te importa contarnos [de] que haces en la vida. ¿Cómo es que llegaste a Santa Ana? Cosas de esta índole. Por favor.


Laura Pantoja: Pues buenas tardes, Elisabeth. También para mi es un gusto estar en tu programa, tu podcast, que me encanta. Y es de... Mi nombre es Laura Pantoja, yo soy de México, de la Ciudad de México. Estoy a punto de cumplir 61 años y ya a cumplir más de 25 años viviendo en Santa Ana, California. Y yo soy organizadora comunitaria. Tengo muchos años. Yo empecé muy joven desde México. A eso me dedico y llegué... ¿Cómo llegué a Santa Ana? Yo siempre les digo a mis amigas que alguien me echó una maldición en el avión cuando venía a California a ver a mis hermanos, porque me quedé, ¿verdad? 


Yo nada más venía de vacaciones, como miles de migrantes, nada más. Venimos por un tiempo, terminamos quedándonos aquí. 

Llegué a vivir a una ciudad que se llama Orange, estuve como 10 años y después llegué aquí a Santa Ana, pero casi todo mi trabajo, o más bien todo mi trabajo, siempre ha sido aquí en Santa Ana y siempre ha sido, no sé por qué, en el centro de Santa Ana, del Downtown, como le dicen. Siempre, siempre he trabajado alrededor de eso.

ELG: Mm mm, mm hm. Y¿cuál[es] tipos de trabajo hay para una organizadora profesional?


Laura Pantoja: No sé si hay una profesión de organizadora.


ELG: [se ríen] Yo creo que sí.


Laura Pantoja: Debe de haber una Universidad de los Organizadores, yo creo, que --


ELG: [se ríe] Sí, sí, como Bachillerato de Organización.


Laura Pantoja: Fíjate que yo cuando era muy chica en México, yo me crié en la Ciudad de México, y es de... Me acuerdo que cuando entré a la High School, a la preparatoria, yo entré a una escuela que se llamaba el Colegio de Ciencias y Humanidades. Y el primer día de clases llegaron unos muchachos que habían sido rechazados de la universidad. El Colegio de Ciencias y Humanidades es de la Universidad Autónoma de México. Y llegaron y no se habían quedado. Llegaron muchos, 50 o 60 jóvenes que querían ingresar, y a mí se me hizo una injusticia. 

Tenía como 15 años. Y ese día se fueron a voltear y hablar con la gente, y no sé por qué, pero me fui con ellos allá.


ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: Creo que ahí empecé a involucrarme en las cosas que pasaban a mi alrededor, verdad? en la comunidad. Y luego en México estuve muchos años, trabajé creando una cooperativa en un lugar que se llama Cholula, Puebla, México.



ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: Y allí aprendí y... Yo me río de mí. Me acuerdo mucho, pues yo era muy joven, tenía como 19 años y llegaba así, con toda la soberbia de la juventud que yo iba a organizar a los campesinos. Y fue al revés, los campesinos terminaron organizándome a mí.

ELG: Ah, claro, claro.


Laura Pantoja: Entonces he tenido una escuela muy bonita, he tenido muchas experiencias de trabajar con la gente. Que es la misma gente. Cuando yo trabajaba en, es de, esa comunidad de Cholula, pues yo decía, "Pues es que esta familia podía ser mi papá, mi mamá, mis tíos, verdad?"


ELG: Mmmm.


Laura Pantoja: Porque mi familia viene del campo, mi abuelo y mi bisabuelo fueron los ejidatarios y eran campesinos.

ELG: Ajá.


Laura Pantoja: Mis tíos, pues desafortunadamente todos tuvieron que emigrar a este a Estados Unidos por todo lo de la economía. Y la tierra que tenían mis abuelos no era suficiente para mantener. Y así se fue viniendo la gente y desapareciendo las comunidades agrícolas, no?


ELG: Si.


Laura Pantoja: Entonces yo me sentía muy cómoda con la gente porque sentía como que estaba con mi familia. Nunca me costó. Y cuando llegué a Estados Unidos, es de… tenía[n] un periódico de una organización que se llamaba -- la organización se llama Hermandad Mexicana, y tenía un periódico en español que era gratis, que se llamaba "La Unión Hispana." Y yo llegué y dije, "Oye, por qué no les vas a ayudar?" Y empecé a ayudarles y trabajé un tiempo escribiendo artículos, haciendo reportajes. 

Y así fue como me fui metiendo en la comunidad y conociendo a la gente y entendiendo un poco cómo funcionaba Santa Ana, y cómo era ser migrante en Estados Unidos, verdad? cuáles son las leyes y cuáles son las leyes que criminalizan a los jóvenes, a las familias migrantes por no tener documentos, no? 

Entonces te digo que yo me he hecho organizadora por la comunidad. Ella es la que me enseña todo lo que hay que hacer.


ELG: Sí, sí. Entonces, realmente la organización comunitaria para ti es vocación? No necesariamente el medio en que ganas la vida, como pagas la renta.


Laura Pantoja: Te digo que aquí trabajé mucho tiempo en un periódico y luego trabaja en el Consulado, muchos años en el Consulado de México, ¡hasta que me corrieron! [las dos se ríen] Nunca se me va a olvidar y es de... Fue una injusticia, como todos los despidos--


ELG: Ayyy...


Laura Pantoja: -- Y después entré a trabajar en una organización que se llama Latino Health Access, que tienen un modelo de promotora, que son las personas que viven en la comunidad y también son expertas en los problemas que pasan en la comunidad. Y estoy trabajando en el departamento de Enlace Comunitario y Abogacía.


ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: Pero yo siempre digo que algo que me marcó en mi vida y creo que por eso he estado tanto tiempo aquí, fue ser voluntaria de una organización que se llama el Centro Cultural de México.


ELG: Claro, claro.


Laura Pantoja: Creo que todos nosotros hemos sido tocados por esa organización de alguna manera. Y yo creo que este espacio para mí es muy importante porque me dio el sentido de pertenecer, ¿verdad?


ELG: Exacto.


Laura Pantoja: Es que eso es muy importante para todos los seres humanos... Entonces de ahí yo pertenecí a esta comunidad de Santa Ana, porque empecé a involucrarme en cosas culturales y de ahí salieron cosas que tienen que ver con la vida de nosotros, ¿verdad? De los migrantes. Y como dicen en el Centro, la cultura también es política, ¿verdad? 


ELG: Exacto. Si.


Laura Pantoja: Cuando empezamos a hacer Posadas, o la Noche de Altares, se celebraba eso y era como un acto político, ¿verdad? Salir a cantar pidiendo posada en la calle, pues casi era revolucionario, podemos decir.

ELG: Pues sí, claro que el Centro Cultural de México ha sido como un tema recurrente en estas entrevistas, porque muchos y muchas de lxs entrevistadxs les he conocido a través del mismo Centro. E igual que con nosotras, no? Es que conozco a ti a través del Centro. Y estoy muy de acuerdo que este sentido de pertenencia es fundamental para cualquier ser humano. Y lo curioso es que en mi caso, no soy de ascendencia latina para nada. Y el español es mi segunda lengua… pero he encontrado el mismo sentido de pertenencia, de acogida y de una integridad entre la cultura y la política en el Centro. Que, bueno, es el motivo porque me trasladé aquí a Santana, en efecto. Así que, sí -- un pequeño anuncio para el Centro, estamos haciendo. [se ríe]  

___________________________________

ENCARTE #1- CCM + pedir posada 


ELG: Tal como digo en la entrevista, el Centro Cultural de México ha sido una piedra de toque para muchxs de mis entrevistadxs, así como para mí. Hace tiempo, en nuestro episodio #3, en que entrevisté a Luis Sarmiento, presenté al Centro como un recurso fundamental de comunidad para muchxs santanerxs de habla hispana.

Tal como muchas instituciones pequeñas y sin fines de lucro, el Centro se encontró golpeado fuerte por la pandemia. Sin embargo ha seguido ofreciendo ayuda económica a lxs indocumentadxs, clínicas de vacunación, y, durante un tiempo, albergue en sus estacionamientos para gente sin hogar que no encontraba otra opción. Es de esperar que en los meses que vienen, El Centro pueda re-abrir sus puertas a la comunidad para ofrecer de nuevo su abanico rico de programas y clases culturales.


Entre éstos, el más conocido ha sido la Noche de Altares que menciona Laura. Este evento toma lugar en torno al Día de los Muertos, el 02 de noviembre, cuando familias y organizaciones de la zona erigen altares a sus muertxs por todo el centro de la ciudad. Estos altares hacen un testimonio conmovedor a las memorias de seres queridxs perdidxs, así como a la riqueza creativa de las artes tradicionales mexicanas.

Laura también menciona “pidiendo posada.” Es un ritual antiguo de la temporada de Navidad, en el cual un grupo anda por las calles cantando y llevando una rama de árbol con decoraciones. Llegan a una casa o iglesia en que les espera otro grupo, y sigue un intercambio cantado que recrea la búsqueda de una posada en donde la Virgen María podría dar a la luz. Al final, el segundo grupo permite que entra el primero, y todos hacen fiesta con ponche y golosinas tradicionales. Laura comenta que en Santa Ana hace una generación, pidiendo posada podía parecer casi revolucionario, por la manera en que llevaba un ritual dramático a las calles de una comunidad suburbana. Ahora todavía tiene resonancias radicales, pues esas mismas calles suburbanas ahora están habitadas por muchxs que no tienen techo, y que pasan sus días literalmente pidiendo posada.


___________________


ELG: Bueno, pasamos entonces a las canciones que elegiste para la entrevista. Y un poco, con un poco de diferencia a muchos entrevistados, es que tenemos tres canciones, dos que representan varios aspectos de tus orígenes o de tus raíces, digamos. 


Laura Pantoja: Mi mamá es del, era de un estado de Jalisco. Y a mi mamá siempre le gustó cantar, no cantaba mal, cantaba entonada. Y siempre nos cantaba. Pero no sé por qué, se hace asociaciones de la mente, cantaba una canción que cantaba Tito Guízar, que se llama "En el rancho grande." -- "Allá donde vivía /había una rancherita /que alegre me decía /te voy a hacer tus calzones / como los usa el ranchero /de los comienzos de lana /te los acabo de cuero." 

Y siempre nos cantaba esa desde chiquitosEntonces, mi mamá viene pues, me imagino porque le gustaba a Tito Guízar, que hacía películas, ¿verdad? Tiene una canción que se llama "Allá en el rancho grande" y tiene muchas, muchas películas. 

Entonces yo creo que eran las películas que mi mamá vivía, vivía de joven y eran las canciones, pues a mi mamá le gustaba mucho cantar esa canción y siempre la relaciono con algo de mi niñez, porque mi mamá no era una mujer urbana, era una mujer de campo.



ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: Pero ya que nos criamos en la Ciudad de México, en las mañanas antes de irnos a este a la escuela, se prendía el radio, ¿verdad? Teníamos televisión, pero oíamos más radio en esa época. Y había a la hora de Cri Cri en la mañana, para que los niños se levantaran y cantaran las canciones. Y me acuerdo mucho de "La patita." 

También la asocio mucho con mi mamá porque dice, 

"La patita va al mercado /con rebozo de bolitas/ regresa a su casa/ y le dicen los patitos / ¿qué me trajiste, mamá?/ qua qua, ¿qué me trajiste? Cuara qua qua." 

-- Pues así como cuando a mi mamá llegaba de la tienda, “¿Qué nos trajiste,” no?


ELG:¡Sí, sí! [ríéndose] Bueno. Que pasemos al...a la canción de Tito Guízar.


___________________________________


ENCARTE #2 – Tito Guízar -- ELG Only


El México de los mediados del s.XX parece haber tenido un suministro sin fin de actor-cantantes imposiblemente guapos, con voces imposiblemente suaves: Pedro Infante, Pedro Vargas, Javier Solís, Jorge Negrete, Pepe Guízar…Tito Guízar era primo hermano de éste último. Su nombre era Federico, pero tomó el apodo de “Tito” para honrar a su querido maestro de voz, el tenor de ópera italiano, Tito Schipa; además tuvo una carrera modesta operística, encima de volverse estrella de cine y cantante popular. Su formación clásica le dio lo que puede ser la voz más bellamente controlada y modulada en un campo de competencia muy fuerte.

___________________

CLIP DE MÚSICA #1: 

Tito Guízar- “Allá en el rancho grande”


ELG: ¡Qué buen modo en que empezar el día!


Laura Pantoja: ¿Verdad? A mi mamá le gustaba mucho esa, es de... Esa canción me acuerdo mucho de ella.


ELG: Sí, claro, claro. Y algo que he aprendido, preparando la entrevista, es que existen muchas grabaciones de esta canción, claro, por varios artistas famosos, entre ellos Tito Guízar, pero cada uno lo canta un poco diferente. Es que ¡hay muchas coplas -- 


Laura Pantoja: Sí!


ELG: -- para la canción. Y eligen sus propias coplas para crear, en cada caso, una canción un poco diferente. Me imagino que tu mamá hiciera lo mismo, como eligiendo las coplas que más estaban al tanto de aquel momento.



Laura Pantoja: Sí, por eso te digo aquello de la copla que me acuerdo, de "Te voy a hacer tus calzones." [carcajea]


ELG: Mm, sí.


Laura Pantoja: Hay algo que me llamaba la atención de niña, verdad? Me imaginaba esa ropa que usaban los charros, la gente que montaba a caballo.


ELG: [Claro, sí... Sí, y siendo niña de la ciudad, imaginando un poco la vida campestre, la vida de pueblo. Así que hacía un poco de, digamos, trabajo intercultural [en] la canción, ¿no?


Laura Pantoja: [Mm-hm.


ELG: Muy interesante, bueno, este fenómeno de la migración desde el campo a la Ciudad de México como una, casi una... Un torbellino de migración. Y tanta, tanta gente estaba llegando en ese entonces.


Laura Pantoja: Sí, de la época de que había trabajo en México, en la Ciudad de México, que la gente, pues, buscando oportunidades emigró a las ciudades grandes, ¿verdad?


ELG: Mm-hm.

__________________________________

ENCARTE #3 - La migración al DF 


DC: Las historias familiares que comparte Laura son evidencia anecdótica de un movimiento histórico muy grande, y muy importante a la historia de México. En los años 50 y 60 del siglo XX, la Zona Metropolitana de la Ciudad de México—es el término que abarca no sólo la Ciudad de México, sino también el Estado de México y las comunidades colindantes--vio la mayor tasa anual de inmigración interna de su larga historia. Era precisamente la etapa en que llegaron los padres de Laura desde Jalisco. En ese período, efectivamente la población de la zona se duplicó, y más, desde unos 3 millones de personas hasta casi 7 millones. Como dice Laura, el motivo más común para la huida de las provincias era la economía. Con el tiempo, el capitalismo en México ha tenido un efecto nefasto en la vida campestre y de pueblo.


La migración interna en México sigue muy fuerte. Según el Censo de 2020, la Zona Metropolitana de la Ciudad de México consiste hoy en día en casi 22 millones de almas humanas.

___________________


Laura Pantoja: Y es de..y chistosamente, mi papá y mamá son de un lugar cercano, pero se conocieron en la Ciudad de México. Tienen hasta amigos comunes.


ELG: ¡Ja!


Laura Pantoja: Cuando se casaron mi mamá cuenta que la gente se reía de ella porque como hablaba, por ejemplo, los bolillos que en la Ciudad de México, en la calle en Jalisco, son "birotes," ¿verdad? Llegaba mi mamá, me daba los birotes y todo el mundo lo veía con cara de, "What?" [carcajea]



ELG: Ja, ja, ja!


Laura Pantoja: "¿Qué quería decir?" 


ELG: Claro. [riéndose]


Laura Pantoja: Entonces esas cosas. Fíjate, hablando de las coincidencias, o... Mi mamá fue migrante en la Ciudad de México, y mi papá. Y nosotros somos -- mi hermano y yo que vivimos en Estados Unidos -- somos migrantes, de este país. Y entonces yo hablaba con mi mamá, pues decía qué tan pesado se le había hecho a ella, ser migrante en la Ciudad de México. Y yo recuerdo que mi mamá nada más estaba esperando el día de la... Que terminaran las clases, y al día siguiente nos íbamos a su pueblo a pasarnos el verano.


ELG: Mmm.


Laura Pantoja: Y era bien bonito porque había agua, canales, sembradíos. Era un lugar donde podías andar como niño, pues nosotros éramos niños de ciudad, pues mi mamá no nos dejaba salir, verdad? Pero en el pueblo de mamá podía andar por todos lados, porque todo el mundo te conocía y te invitaba a comer. Entonces yo me acuerdo que en vacaciones yo nunca veía a mi mamá y a mi papá todo el día, hasta cuando ya llegaba a dormir.


ELG: [se ríe] Si.


Laura Pantoja: Y era bien bonito, ¿no? Era muy divertido.


ELG: Sííí...todos los niños, las niñas, a gusto todo el día, como explorando la zona en seguridad perfecta, no? 


Laura Pantoja: Sí.


ELG: Es como un paraíso. Un tipo de paraíso.


Laura Pantoja: Sí...Y sabes que a mí me gusta mucho leer desde. Desde muy niña empecé a leer, yo me leía todo lo que encontraba. Y me acuerdo que en el pueblo había… No me acuerdo de quién era la casa, pero me gustaba ir a su casa porque en los pueblos tienen la costumbre de que tienen abiertas las ventanas y las puertas -- Y esos corredores, te ha tocado, ¿verdad? Con macetas llenas de helechos y de plantas, y un verde fresco?


ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: No sé si era mi tía o mi prima lejana, pero debajo de su cama tenía un cajón de madera con todas las... Estos pasquines o, es de, novelitas de cómics, que se llamaba "Lágrimas y risas." Y contaban historias que después las hicieron telenovelas, ¿no? [ELG se ríe] Por ejemplo, "El pecado de Oyuki." Pero tenía toda la colección. Entonces yo me pasaba parte de mis vacaciones poniéndome al día de todo lo que ella coleccionaba.



ELG: Sí, sí. Ay, qué rico! Qué rico! Yo me acuerdo, en mi niñez en el estado de Oregón, bueno, cada semana al pasarnos al mercado, teníamos el derecho de escoger un cómic, como algo así, para leer toda la semana. Y yo encantada, encantada por eso…


Laura Pantoja: Y eso contribuyó a que te guste leer, verdad? Yo siempre digo es que por ahí yo agarré el vicio de la lectura.


ELG: Mm-hm. Ja ja, "el vicio." Sí, es un gran vicio, ¿verdad?... 

_____________________________________


INSERT #4 - “Lágrimas y risas


ELG: Lágrimas, risas y amor era una historieta, es decir, un cómic, de larga vida y amplia influencia cultural en México. Se publicó durante 32 años, entre 1962 y 1994. Ofreció historias episódicas sobre temas dramáticos y sentimentales, con viñetas en medio tono; varios se conviertieron en telenovelas. La serie que menciona Laura, “El pecado de Oyuki,” llegó a ser una de las secuencias más exitosas de la revista. Se convirtió en telenovela en 1988.

Resalto este medio popular aquí por los motivos que expresa Laura: para varias generaciones ahora maduras, el gusto por estas revistas humildes que no tienen prestigio literario en absoluto nos condució a hacernos lectores serixs por toda la vida. Así fue para Laura; y así ha sido para mí. En mi caso anglófono, la historietas eran de Marvel Comics, con cuentos fantástico-románticos de héroes (y a veces alguna heroína). 

___________________

ELG: Pues bueno, entonces pasando a la segunda de tus dos primeras canciones. Ah, es que la figura de Cri Cri, en cierto sentido es como una figura de cómic; pero en realidad era un hombre, un señor que cantaba y tenía, según entiendo, un programa de radio. Cuéntanos un poquito de cómo llegaste a conocer su música, y como el papel que tenía la música en tu vida de niña. 


Laura Pantoja: Bueno, me gustaba mucho, sobre todo porque como que te despertaban las canciones de Cri Cri, verdad? Pero las canciones de Cri Cri también eran como cuentos.


ELG: Sí.


Laura Pantoja: Primero su personaje es el grillito cantor, que tenía un estribillo, su programa: "Quién es ese que anda ahí?/ Es Cri Cri / Cri Cri, el grillo cantor." 

CLIP DE MÚSICA #2: 

Firma sonora Cri Cri


Laura Pantoja: -- Entonces ya sabías que iba a comenzar el programa. Entonces ahí te contaba la historia, la canción de los tres cochinitos, o la patita que va al mercado, o la muñeca fea, o de mi abuelita. Bueno, eran cuentos, verdad? 

Pero creo que lo bueno de nosotros que escuchamos Cri Cri es que -- Gabilondo Soler era su nombre. Y era un músico, verdad? Y sabía de música. Entonces te enseñaban ritmos de verdad. Tenemos este chachachá, jazz, blues en sus canciones. Es como que siento que te dio una cierta educación musical para los ritmos y para el gusto, verdad?


ELG: Ajá.


Laura Pantoja: Entonces contribuyó mucho. Si tienes la oportunidad de escuchar a Cri Cri con calma, vas a encontrar de todos los ritmos de Veracruz, del norte... El ratón vaquero, ¿verdad? ¿Sabes del ratón vaquero? La historia, que sacó sus pistolas...Imagínate un niño, estás oyendo las canciones, pero, pues, estás imaginando a los personajes. Yo me imaginaba la patita con su rebozo, pero también asociaba a mi mamá cuando llegaba del mercado y le preguntábamos "Qué nos trajiste," verdad? [ELG se ríe] ¡Si le preguntamos a mi mamá! Entonces es de, creo que contribuyó mucho al gusto musical y a la formación de generaciones. En México todavía las mamás les ponen a sus niños Cri Cri.


ELG: Ajá.


Laura Pantoja: Y hay otros cantantes ahora, verdad? pero Cri Cri es como un símbolo casi mexicano.


ELG: Pues también me parece que, además de contribuir a la apreciación de la música, de las músicas regionales y todo eso, me parece que hay un elemento, en  varias de sus canciones, hay un elemento de la crítica social que me sorprendió mucho, pero muchísimo. Y voy a sugerir que nos pasemos a escuchar la canción, porque esta canción tiene como una...Tuerce al final. Tuerce al final en un sentido no esperado. Y me hizo, ¡me hizo reírme hasta llorar! -- Así que vamos a escuchar "La patita."

__________________________________

CLIP DE MÚSICA #2, “Cri Cri, “La patita”

___________________________________


ELG: Pues te lo digo, nunca he escuchado ninguna canción infantil con un final así. La canción tiene todo un tono de inocencia y de ligereza, ¿sabes? Y luego al final, un ensayo en la crítica social bastante punzante, ¿no?


Laura Pantoja: Mm-hm.


ELG: Entiendo que no es un ejemplo aislado en la obra de Cri Cri.  


Laura Pantoja: Yo creo que como crítica social estaba pensando, por ejemplo, que está todo bien caro en el mercado. Yo creo que las mamás se sentían identificadas -- 


ELG: Claro, ¡sí!


Laura Pantoja: -- con eso y ya de tanto tener tantos hijos, hoy no hay que darles de comer. Pues "Que coman mosquitos.” También habla de esa canción de "La muñeca fea," ¿no? Que habla un poco de, es de, de ser diferente, ¿verdad? De respetar las diferencias. Buen punto, ¿eh? Hay que hacer una tesis. [carcajea]


ELG: Ja ja. Eso es.

_____________________________________


ENCARTE #5 - Gabilondo Soler y Cri Cri 


NOTA: Esto no es una traducción, sino un diálogo improvisado que trata de temas parecidos en las dos lenguas. 



ELG: Pues, de hecho, sí hay algunas tesis sobre esta figura del Cri Cri, Francisco Gabilondo Soler. Es una figura interesantísima. Es interesante porque todas son muy recientes. Sólo recientemente -- yo diría, en los últimos 20 años -- ha habido un reconocimiento del hecho de que el arte infantil realmente es arte, digna de la atención seria. Así que yo creo que Gabilondo Soler reconocía la importancia del arte infantil de una manera única. Una manera muy notable. La calidad de su arte, de sus 215 canciones infantiles--


DC: ¡215! Guau.


ELG:¡Sí! Sí, es que su show, su programa de radio, tenía como hace 30 años y más.


DC:¡Guau!


ELG: Componía en varios estilos. Es como una plena educación musical que se encuentra nomás escuchando a sus canciones. Y no sé, David, si tienes unas observaciones sobre esta música que compuso Gabilondo Soler.


DC: Bueno, como músico y compositor solamente puedo decir que el nivel de maestría musical es tan alto, y tan bien hecho. Es impresionante.


ELG: No solamente, bueno, la composición, digamos, pero también lo de la interpretación. Las orquestas, por ejemplo.


DC: Claro.


ELG: Es que cada canción tenía un acompañamiento orquestal en vivo.


DC: En vivo, en vivo.


ELG: Si, y esta cosa no -- creo que no se escucha ahorita.  En como los, los -- cómo se dice "cartoons"?


DC: Yo no sé, en mi familia se llamaban “monos”…


ELG: Los monos de niños de ahora, mi impresión es que no tienen una calidad comparable.


DC: Yo no creo, porque yo no oigo ninguna orquesta en esos programas. [se ríe]


ELG: Yo creo que el arte que traía Gabilondo Soler a sus canciones, a sus programas, es una cosa que tiene importancia moral en el contexto familiar, digamos, y tal como dice Laura: lo que escuchamos, muy tempranito, muy tempranito, nos afecta, nos forma para toda la vida. Y yo creo que Gabilondo Soler lo sabía de manera muy suya. Y otra cosa que voy a mencionar porque es un rasgo de su obra, muy particular, es su habilidad con la sátira. Gabilondo Soler no tarda en meter la sátira -- y la sátira punzante -- en sus canciones, y eso se escucha hacia el fin de "La patita," la canción que eligió Laura. Pero hay otra que también menciona Laura, "El ratón vaquero."

Es preciosa esta canción, es…Bueno, ¡es estadounidense, este ratón![lxs dos se ríen]  Tiene sus pistolas, pero está en una cárcel mexicana. Y está muy frustrado porque no, no le dejan salir. Así que va como con sus pistolas y protestando en inglés. "What is this place?" dice.


DC: Ja ja ja.


ELG: Pero los mexicanos dicen, "Ah, bueno, es que no puedes salir, es que hiciste algo mal y esas son las consecuencias."


DC: Oh, no! Y ¿por qué está en la cárcel?


ELG: No dice el porque.


DC: Oh, no! [lxs dos se ríen]


ELG: Es icónico. Bueno, escuchamos un ratito del "Ratón vaquero," para cerrar.

___________________________________

CLIP DE MÚSICA DE ENCARTE: Cri Cri - “El ratón vaquero”

________________________________


___________________


ELG: Bueno, si no una tesis, sí es digno de pensar un poco, porque el acto de despertar la conciencia social es una cosa que empieza en las familias, no? el sentido de la justicia, que es motor del activismo y motor de la, bueno, el trabajo de organización comunitaria que haces tú, por ejemplo. Es una cosa muy digna de pensar, creo: ¿Cómo pueden los músicos y los que se dedican a la música infantil, cómo pueden ayudar a lxs niñxs a desarrollar su conciencia social, su conciencia de lo justo y de los derechos que en verdad tienen?



Laura Pantoja: Tiene mucho que ver con los valores, verdad? Un poco de los valores, pero la práctica de tus papás, verdad?


ELG: Eso, sí.


Laura Pantoja: Una cosa es lo que te dicen, y una cosa es lo que hacen en la vida real las personas. Y cuando eres niño, te fijas mucho en eso. Entonces también tiene que ver cómo, cómo actúan tus papás ante las personas necesitadas o en los momentos de injusticia, ¿verdad?


ELG: Eso sí.


Laura Pantoja: Entonces como que, ahí vas tomando nota inconscientemente, seguro? De que las cosas no están bien repartidas en este mundo, no? -- Ya me acuerdo mucho en México, que se acostumbraba el Día de los Reyes. Yo vivía en una calle de clase trabajadora, pero había gente que eran maestros, eran funcionarios del gobierno, ¿verdad? Y había gente con menos recursos. Y el día de este me recuerdo mucho. Pues unos salían con sus carros o sus bicicletas del último modelo, sus muñecotas. Pero había muchos niños que no tenían nada. Había alguien que tenía una bolsa de canicas y con esa bolsa de canicas era suficiente, porque ya tenía algo nuevo, un juguete. Pero sí había niños que nomás veían a los demás y eso se me hacía feo. Yo me acuerdo mucho.


ELG: Mm-hm.


Laura Pantoja: Se me hacía injusto. Entonces es por algo que uno escucha en su casa, que hablan de las injusticias.


ELG: Estas cosas empiezan muy temprano en la vida, creo. Y bueno, la cuestión es, cómo las llevamos hacia adelante y qué tipo de vida construimos en torno a las injusticias, los sucesos que observamos, no?


Laura Pantoja: Sí, lo que oímos, lo que vemos, lo que leemos, todo tiene que ver, somos producto de todo eso, verdad?


ELG: Eso es. Mm-hm. Bueno, es buen punto de inflexión para volver la atención a la tercera canción, que es la que escogiste, que expresa o representa tus esperanzas para el futuro. Y...es una elección súper interesante. Yo creo que a mí me gustaría escuchar la canción de Silvio Rodríguez que escogiste, "La maza," y luego hablaremos.


Laura Pantoja: Adelante.

____________________________________

CLIP DE MÚSICA #3:  Silvio Rodríguez “La maza”

____________________________________


ELG: ¡Uf!


Laura Pantoja: Esta canción siempre me hace llorar.


ELG: Claro. Sí...Poderosa.


Laura Pantoja: Me gusta mucho por el sentido de la sustancia de los valores y es como una canción filosófica, verdad?


ELG: [Súper filosófica.


Laura Pantoja: El sentido de la vida y de a qué te agarras para seguir viviendo, verdad? O ¿cuál es la razón? Creo que se parece mucho a la vida.


ELG:  [carcajea] Pues se parece, se parece mucho a la vida, porque toda la canción se organiza en torno de una pregunta que nunca se contesta. ¡Tal como la vida!


Laura Pantoja: Se me hace una canción pura, me recuerda cosas que yo creía y que sigo creyendo, verdad? Y eso es lo que sostiene para seguir adelante, haciendo las cosas que me gustan.


ELG: Pero a mí me parece que es una seña de una cierta, digamos, madurez espiritual, tener esta lista de valores, digamos, de cosas en la vida en qué creer, pero en forma, en forma de pregunta solamente. Es que ¡nunca contesta! Toda la canción está en el subjuntivo y no, nunca, contesta su propia pregunta. Ni va a contestar. Y es... Esto como principio de esperanza, como fundamento de una esperanza de la vida, me parece muy, muy profundo, porque no es nada fácil basar la fe para seguir en la vida, en la incertidumbre. [se ríe]


Laura Pantoja: Claro, pues así es la vida, una incertidumbre, ¿no?


ELG: Eso es, pero el acto de aprender cómo confiar en la incertidumbre es, es un aprendizaje de toda la vida, no? Es que fallamos constantemente con eso. O por lo menos fallo yo.


Laura Pantoja: Todos nos desanimamos y luego no encontramos para dónde va.


ELG: ¡Sí!


Laura Pantoja: Nos sentimos solos en el universo...Estas letras, estas canciones, cada vez que la escucho me hace llorar, pero me hacen sentir feliz. Como es la contradicción, ¿verdad?


ELG: Pues es que tenemos compañía en el camino. El mismo Silvio Rodríguez es compañía, hace compañía en este camino a veces muy duro. Con la compañía, todo es posible.


Laura Pantoja: Es menos duro, verdad? Claro, porque eres tú, verdad, con tus propias contradicciones, sus propias conversaciones, tus silencios y los demás. Por eso el sentido de pertenecer y hacer una comunidad es algo que te mantiene vivo, verdad? Mucho se lo debemos a los espacios que hemos ayudado a crear. Tú también, Elisabeth, verdad? Seguramente en el Centro, en el son, en lo que tú haces en tu escuela, verdad?


ELG: Mm-hmm.


Laura Pantoja: Nos mantiene vivos, con la esperanzas que nos brillan los ojos, no? Y yo creo que es algo que hay que agradecerle siempre, verdad? Ese patrocinio que nos mandó el universo para estar aquí hoy y seguir creando, ¿verdad? No sé quién nos está  patrocinando, pero alguien ha de ser en el universo, ¿no?


ELG: Qué buen modo de expresarlo, sí. Y bueno, regresando un ratito a la canción, una cosa que me llama mucho la atención, y realmente me agarra el corazón, es que no sólo la letra, sino la música que ha puesto el Silvio Rodríguez ha. La música misma, según su manera, habla de esto, porque usa una vuelta armónica, una serie de acordes en esta canción que nunca se cierra. Se repite y se repite y se repite, pero no tiene, nunca alcanza el reposo. Así que las notas, los tonos mismos, están expresando ese sentido de búsqueda, digamos. Y –


Laura Pantoja. Sí, [Y] de poder, ¿no? O sea, va subiendo la intensidad, ¿verdad? De lo que, "Qué cosa, qué cosa, qué cosa fuera." ¿Verdad?


ELG: [carcajea] Eso.


Laura Pantoja: Y todo eso de las armonías y todo, es de especialista, ¿no?



ELG: Pues sí, pero lo menciono no para, no para ufanarse de mí, de mis conocimientos, pero es que, sí me llaman la atención, porque esos efectos que ponen los cantautores con su música nos afectan mucho. Nos afectan mucho, a otro nivel que las palabras. Y las palabras, sí, podemos hablar de la letra, y mucho. Pero también la música contribuye un elemento muy importante, muy poderoso.



Laura Pantoja: Como cuando toca no sé qué instrumento sea, tambor. Toca pam, pam, pam. Como que eso es de poder, ¿no? Me gusta mucho esa parte.



ELG: Sí, a mí también.


________________

ENCARTE #6 - Silvio Rodríguez 

NOTA: Esto no es una traducción, sino un diálogo improvisado que trata de temas parecidos en las dos lenguas. 

DC: Okay... Silvio Rodríguez, uno de los cantantes más famosos de toda América Latina, un artista de nivel tan alto. 

La música que hace Silvio Rodríguez es una música llamada Nueva Trova, no? Es una música que se trata de compartir crítica social, con poesía, con música. Y eso viene de otra música más antigua que se llama la trova. La trova fue música hecho por músicos viajeros a principios del siglo XX, en la provincia de Oriente, de la isla de Cuba.


ELG: Mmmm.


DC: Y hasta una de las formas de la trova que quizás podremos oír hoy en día es el bolero. El bolero que [a] todos los latinoamericanos les encanta, el bolero: el Trío Los Panchos, Juan Gabriel, todos los artistas muy famosos de América Latina hacen boleros. Eso viene de la trova.  


ELG: Esto de la procedencia de la Nueva Trova, de una trova más antigua, es que me recuerda de un hecho histórico al otro lado del mar Atlántico,los trovadores, músicos itinerantes que viajaban de ciudad en ciudad, de corte en corte, compartiendo su arte, cantando, tocando. Me imagino que el término "trova" tiene algo que ver con esta historia muy, muy larga. Y de hecho se puede escuchar en esta canción, "La maza," esta procedencia de siglos Tal como menciono en la entrevista, es que la vuelta armónica, los acordes con que empieza esta canción "La maza," es que siguen, con algunas variaciones, por toda la canción. Y suenan así.

_____________________________________

CLIP DE MÚSICA DE ENCARTE:  Silvio Rodríguez “La maza” 2:05-2:35

____________________________________


ELG. Y bueno, ahora escuchamos otra vuelta armónica muy parecida...

 

CLIP DE MÚSICA de ENCARTE:  “Lamento della ninfa,” abertura

__________________________________


ELG: Esto es el inicio de la del "Lamento de la ninfa" del compositor italiano Claudio Monteverdi. Y bueno, se compuso, si no mal me acuerdo, en 1638.


DC: Ahhh...


ELG: [carcajea] Así que... Se puede escuchar: son muy parecidos. Así que este arte de los trovadores o de la trova tiene una historia súper rica, súper larga.


DC: [Sí, sí. Para mí es un ejemplo de lo que es ser un artista, lo que es ser un ser humano, no? que los humanos se inspiran uno en otros a lo largo de los siglos. Es así y así será.


ELG: Sí, compartiendo nuestra música, bueno, en ambos lados de un mar y en islas y en la tierra firme, en todos lados.


DC: Mm hm.

________________


ELG: Sí, bueno, es…. Yo creo que es una buena elección, muy especial que has hecho, porque deja abierta la cuestión de adónde vamos [se ríe] y por qué y para qué.


Laura Pantoja: Lo que creemos, verdad? Que puede ser de muchas maneras expresado. Como tú dices. Y te digo casi siempre que la escucho, pues me mueve muchas cosas en el corazón, ¿no?  Ya es como que dicen que somos producto del lugar donde nacimos, la historia, la economía, y tal vez somos producto de la música, ¿verdad? Parte de nuestra enseñanza amorosa, y de todo tipo de enseñanza, tiene que ver [con] la música que nos tocó escuchar y vivir.


ELG: Sí. Y ¡por eso este podcast! [se ríe] Porque la música abre puertas entre la gente y entre -- entre los corazones, no?



Laura Pantoja: Sí, enriquece las vidas.


ELG: Sí... Pues a mí me parece un buenísimo momento en que cerrar la entrevista, porque ¡no sé en dónde pasar de este punto filosófico, pero bonito, que hemos alcanzado!



Laura Pantoja: Gracias por todo este esfuerzo de contar las historias a través de la música de las personas que están a tu alrededor. Es una buena manera de contribuir al mundo, verdad?


ELG: Espero que si. Es que a mí... Bueno, yo gozo un privilegio enorme al poder escuchar las músicas de mis conocidos, y en algunos casos gente nueva para mí, y así llegar a un sentido más amplio, más profundo de toda una comunidad muy especial, que es esta de Santa Ana. Así que estoy muy agradecida por la oportunidad. Realmente.


Laura Pantoja: Fue un gusto, ¿eh? Verdadero.


ELG: Sí, un gran gusto, y muchas gracias.


Laura Pantoja: Me llevaste a muchos lugares de mi vida. [carcajea]


ELG: [se ríe] Qué precioso. Es un privilegio para mí.


Laura Pantoja: Cuídate mucho, porque yo me voy a otra junta. Tengo otra junta.


ELG: Muy bien, muy bien. Nos veremos.



Laura Pantoja: Ándale, 'bye.


ELG: Chao.


¿Quisieran saber más?


En nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, pueden encontrar transcripciones completas en ambas lenguas de cad entrevistaa; nuestro Blog, donde indagamos más en los asuntos históricos, culturales, y políticos que surgen en torno a cada canción; enlaces para oyentes que quisieran investigar un tema más a fondo; y unos imágenes muy chidos. Encontrarán un playlist con todas las canciones de todas las entrevistas hasta la fecha, así como otro playlist elegido por nuestro equipo.


¡Esperamos sus comentarios o preguntas! Contáctennos en nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, o bien pueden participar en la conversación “Si yo fuera” a través de los medios sociales. Estamos en FeisBuk e Instagram. Y, pues, también hay el modo antiguo, de boca en boca. Si les gusta nuestro show, por favor digan a sus amigxs y familiares que lo escuchen. Y por favor, suscríbanse, a través de su plataforma de podcast preferida. Les traeremos una nueva entrevista cada dos semanas, los viernes por la mañana.


Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, y Wesley McClintock son nuestros soniderxs; Zoë Broussard y Laura Díaz manejan la mercadotecnia; David Castañeda es Investigador de Música; Jen Orenstein traduce las entrevistas entre español e inglés; y Deyaneira García y Alex Dolven facilitan la producción. Somos una entidad sin fines de lucro, actualmente y agradecidamente apoyada por una beca desde la Fundación John Simon Guggenheim, así como fondos desde el Programa de Becas de Facultad de la Universidad de California, Los Angeles, y de la Escuela de Música Herb Alpert en la misma Universidad.


Por ahora, y hasta la próxima entrevista--¡que sigan escuchando unxs a otrxs! Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, y están escuchando, “Si yo fuera una canción.”


English

Centro Cultural de México

http://elcentroculturaldemexico.org/ (bilingual Web page)


https://www.latimes.com/socal/daily-pilot/entertainment/story/2021-02-25/el-centro-mexican-cultural-center-homeless-santa-ana (recent article in English)


Tito Guízar

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tito_Gu%C3%ADzar 


Poppe, Nicolas. "Tito Guízar on Radio Row: Intermediality, Latino identity, and two early 1930s Vitaphone shorts." The Routledge Companion To Gender, Sex And Latin American Culture. Routledge, 2018. 91-100.

Irwin, R. M. y Castro Ricalde, M. (2013). Global Mexican Cinema. Its Golden Age. London: British Film Institute, Palgrave MacMillan.


Internal migration in Mexico

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demograf%C3%ADa_de_la_Ciudad_de_M%C3%A9xico 

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%81reas_metropolitanas_de_M%C3%A9xico 


Villarreal, Andrés, and Erin R. Hamilton. "Rush to the border? Market liberalization and urban-and rural-origin internal migration in Mexico." Social science research 41.5 (2012): 1275-1291.


Lágrimas y risas  (comic book series)

Todo en español

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A1grimas,_risas_y_amor#Caracter%C3%ADsticas

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_pecado_de_Oyuki_(comics)


Cri Cri (Francisco Gabilondo Soler)

There appears to be no substantial work in English on Cri Cri. See the references below for more information.


Alcaráz, José Antonio. Cri-Crí: el mensajero de la alegría. Veracruz: Instituto Veracruzano

de Cultura, 1998.


Colina, José de la. «Prólogo» en Cri-Crí: canciones completas de Francisco Gabilondo

Soler. México: Clío, 2001.


Desachy-Godoy, Elvira. Cri-Crí: El mundo creativo de Francisco José Gabilondo Soler. The University of New Mexico, 1998.


García, Elvira. De lunas garapiñadas: Cri-Cri. México: Radio Universidad Nacional

Autónoma de México, 1982.

«¿Quién es el que anduvo aquí?» en Tierra adentro. Días de radio,

México: n° 137-138, diciembre 2005: 97-99.


García, Óscar Armando. “Poética literaria y musical de Francisco Gabilondo Soler ‘Cri-crí.’“ América sin Nombre - 2015, N. 20. Te voy a contar un cuento. Sobre la literatura infantil y juvenil 


VV AA: Cri-Crí: canciones completas de Francisco Gabilondo

Soler. México: Clío, 2001.


Silvio Rodríguez

“Cuban troubadour Silvio Rodríguez speaks out” | People’s World (https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/cuban-troubadour-silvio-rodriguez-speaks-out/)

“Silvio Rodríguez” | Discogs (https://www.discogs.com/artist/400811-Silvio-Rodr%C3%ADguez

“Silvio Rodríguez” | NPR (https://www.npr.org/artists/801185470/silvio-rodr-guez)

Español

Centro Cultural de México

http://elcentroculturaldemexico.org/ (bilingual Web page)


https://www.latimes.com/socal/daily-pilot/entertainment/story/2021-02-25/el-centro-mexican-cultural-center-homeless-santa-ana (recent article in English)


Tito Guízar

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tito_Gu%C3%ADzar 


Poppe, Nicolas. "Tito Guízar on Radio Row: Intermediality, Latino identity, and two early 1930s Vitaphone shorts." The Routledge Companion To Gender, Sex And Latin American Culture. Routledge, 2018. 91-100.

Irwin, R. M. y Castro Ricalde, M. (2013). Global Mexican Cinema. Its Golden Age. London: British Film Institute, Palgrave MacMillan.


La migración interna en México

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demograf%C3%ADa_de_la_Ciudad_de_M%C3%A9xico 

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%81reas_metropolitanas_de_M%C3%A9xico 


Villarreal, Andrés, and Erin R. Hamilton. "Rush to the border? Market liberalization and urban-and rural-origin internal migration in Mexico." Social science research 41.5 (2012): 1275-1291.


Lágrimas y risas (revista de cómic)

Todo en español

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A1grimas,_risas_y_amor#Caracter%C3%ADsticas

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_pecado_de_Oyuki_(comics)


Cri Cri (Francisco Gabilondo Soler)

Todo en español.


Alcaráz, José Antonio. Cri-Crí: el mensajero de la alegría. Veracruz: Instituto Veracruzano

de Cultura, 1998.


Colina, José de la. «Prólogo» en Cri-Crí: canciones completas de Francisco Gabilondo

Soler. México: Clío, 2001.


Desachy-Godoy, Elvira. Cri-Crí: El mundo creativo de Francisco José Gabilondo Soler. The University of New Mexico, 1998.


García, Elvira. De lunas garapiñadas: Cri-Cri. México: Radio Universidad Nacional

Autónoma de México, 1982.

----------------- «¿Quién es el que anduvo aquí?» en Tierra adentro. Días de radio,

México: n° 137-138, diciembre 2005: 97-99.


García, Óscar Armando. “Poética literaria y musical de Francisco Gabilondo Soler ‘Cri-crí.’“ América sin Nombre - 2015, N. 20. Te voy a contar un cuento. Sobre la literatura infantil y juvenil 


VV AA: Cri-Crí: canciones completas de Francisco Gabilondo

Soler. México: Clío, 2001.


Silvio Rodríguez

“Cuban troubadour Silvio Rodríguez speaks out” | People’s World (https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/cuban-troubadour-silvio-rodriguez-speaks-out/)

“Silvio Rodríguez” | Discogs (https://www.discogs.com/artist/400811-Silvio-Rodr%C3%ADguez

“Silvio Rodríguez” | NPR (https://www.npr.org/artists/801185470/silvio-rodr-guez)

La Maza - Silvio Rodriguez

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

Si no creyera en la locura
De la garganta del sinsonte
Si no creyera que en el monte
Se esconde el trino y la pavura

Si no creyera en la balanza
En la razón del equilibrio
Si no creyera en el delirio
Si no creyera en la esperanza

Si no creyera en lo que agencio
Si no creyera en mi camino
Si no creyera en mi sonido
Si no creyera en mi silencio

Qué cosa fuera
Qué cosa fuera, la maza sin cantera
Un amasijo hecho de cuerdas y tendones
Un revoltijo de carne con madera

Un instrumento sin mejores resplandores
Que lucecitas montadas para escena
Qué cosa fuera, corazón, qué cosa fuera
Qué cosa fuera la maza sin cantera

Un testaferro del traidor de los aplausos
Un servidor de pasado en copa nueva
Un eternizador de dioses del ocaso
Júbilo hervido con trapo y lentejuela

Qué cosa fuera, corazón, que cosa fuera
Qué cosa fuera la maza sin cantera
Qué cosa fuera, corazón, que cosa fuera
Qué cosa fuera la maza sin cantera

Si no creyera en lo más duro
Si no creyera en el deseo
Si no creyera en lo que creo
Si no creyera en algo puro

Si no creyera en cada herida
Si no creyera en la que ronde
Si no creyera en lo que esconde
Hacerse hermano de la vida

Si no creyera en quien me escucha
Si no creyera en lo que duele
Si no creyera en lo que quede
Si no creyera en lo que lucha

Qué cosa fuera
Qué cosa fuera la maza sin cantera
Un amasijo hecho de cuerdas y tendones
Un revoltijo de carne con madera

Un instrumento sin mejores resplandores
Que lucecitas montadas para escena
Qué cosa fuera, corazón, qué cosa fuera
Qué cosa fuera la maza sin cantera

Un testaferro del traidor de los aplausos
Un servidor de pasado en copa nueva
Un eternizador de dioses del ocaso
Júbilo hervido con trapo y lentejuela

Qué cosa fuera, corazón, qué cosa fuera
Qué cosa fuera la maza sin cantera
Qué cosa fuera, corazón, qué cosa fuera
Qué cosa fuera la maza sin cantera


Traducción | Translation

If I didn’t believe in the insanity

From the mockingbird’s throat

If I didn’t believe that in the mountains

The trill and dread hide

If I didn’t believe in the balance

In the sanity of equilibrium

If I didn’t believe in delirium

If I didn’t believe in hope

If I didn’t believe in what I work for

If I didn’t believe in my path

If I didn’t believe in my sound

If I didn’t believe in my silence

What would it be 

What would the mace be without the quarry

A mess of cords and tendons

A jumble of flesh and wood

An instrument with no better brightness

Than little lights mounted on a stage

What would it be, my love, what would it be

What would the mace be without the quarry

A strawman of the traitor of the applause

A servant of the past in a new glass

A perpetuator of gods of decline

Jubilation boiled with rag and sequin

What would it be, my love, what would it be

What would the mace be without the quarry

What would it be, my love, what would it be

What would the mace be without the quarry

If I didn’t believe in what’s hardest

If I didn’t believe in desire

If I didn’t believe in what I believe

If I didn’t believe in something pure

If I didn’t believe in every wound

If I didn’t believe in that which prowls

If I didn’t believe in that which hides

To be life’s brother

If I didn’t believe in the one who listens to me

If I didn’t believe in what hurts me

If I didn’t believe in what remains

If I didn’t believe in that which struggles

What would it be

What would the mace be without the quarry

A mess of cords and tendons

A jumble of flesh and wood

An instrument with no better brightness

Than little lights mounted on a stage

What would it be, my love, what would it be

What would the mace be without the quarry

A strawman of the traitor of the applause

A servant of the past in a new glass

A perpetuator of gods of decline

Jubilation boiled with rag and sequin

What would it be, my love, what would it be

What would the mace be without the quarry

What would it be, my love, what would it be

What would the mace be without the quarry


More about "La Maza": A word with a couple different meanings, here ‘mace’ refers to a club-like instrument, possibly even a sledgehammer, made of stone and wood.

La Patita - Cri Cri

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

La patita
De canasta y con reboso de bolita
Va al mercado
A comprar todas las cosas del mandado

La patita
Va corriendo y buscando en su bolsita
Centavitos
Para darles de comer a sus patitos

Porque ya sabe que al retornar
Toditos ellos preguntarán
(Que me trajiste, mama cua cua)
(Que me trajiste, cuara cua cua)

La patita (Como tú)
De canasta y con reboso de bolita
Como tú
Se ha enojado (Como tú)
Por lo caro que está todo en el mercado

Sus patitos
Van creciendo y no tienen zapatitos
Y su esposo
Es un pato sinvergüenza y perezoso

Que no da nada, para comer
Y la patita, pues que va hacer
Cuando le pidan contestará
(Coman mosquitos, cuara cua cua)

Traducción | Translation

The little duck

With her basket and polka-dot shawl

Goes to market

To buy everything she needs

The little duck

Rushing, searching in her purse

For pennies

To use to feed her ducklings

Because she knows when she comes back

They’ll all ask

(What did you bring me, Mama cua cua)

(What did you bring me, Mama cuara cua cua)

The little duck (Like you)

With her basket and polka-dot shawl

Like you

Has gotten angry (Like you)

At how expensive everything at the market is

Her ducklings

Are growing and they don’t have shoes

And her husband

Is a shameless, lazy duck

Who doesn’t provide anything to eat

And the little duck, well what can she do?

When they ask her she’ll answer

(Eat flies, cuara cua cua)

Allá en el Rancho Grande - Jorge Negrete

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

Allá en el rancho grande,
allá donde vivía,
había una rancherita,
que alegre me decía;
que alegre me decía:

Te voy a hacer tus calzones
como los que usa un ranchero
te los comienzo de lana

y te los acabo de cuero


Allá en el rancho grande,
allá donde vivía,
había una rancherita,
que alegre me decía;
que alegre me decía:


El gusto de un buen ranchero

Es tener su buen caballo

Pa’ensillarlo por las tardes

Darle la vuelta al vallado


Allá en el rancho grande,
allá donde vivía,
había una rancherita,
que alegre me decía;
que alegre me decía.

Traducción | Translation

Over on the big ranch

Over where I lived,

there was a rancher lady

who happily told me:

who happily told me:


I’m going to make you your underwear

Like the ranchers wear

I’ll start them with wool

And I’ll finish them in leather


Over on the big ranch

Over where I lived,

there was a rancher lady

who happily told me:

who happily told me:


The pleasure of a good rancher

Is to have his good horse

To saddle up in the evenings

And ride around the coral


Over on the big ranch

Over where I lived,

there was a rancher lady

who happily told me:

who happily told me: