Episodio / Episode #
5
May 28, 2021

Graciela Hinojosa Holguín & Jorge Holguín (Part 2)

English

Español

English

ELG: So now we’ll turn our virtual gaze to you, Jorge. And I want to explain to the listeners that we’ve worked together for some time, it’s a few years now that we’ve been members of a little son jarocho group here in Santa Ana, and that’s why I speak so familiarly to don Jorge…So then, if you can begin, just like we did with Maestra Chela, just introducing yourself a little bit to the audience: your full name and some facts about your life.

Jorge: Okay, here we go…well, to start with, my name on my birth certficate is Ricardo, Ricardo Jorge Holguín.

ELG: Mmm.

Jorge: So what happened is that my mother wanted me to be Ricardo, and my father wanted it to be Jorge, or George in English. We were living in El Paso, Texas. And so they kept calling me George, and when my brother was born, they named him Ricardo! So that’s how it is: he’s Ricardo, and I’m Ricardo Jorge. And that stuck. I’m stuck with George!

ELG: [laughs]

Jorge: --Jorge. So, we left for Los Angeles when I was six. And I was raised here in the, in Boyle Heights. And there, well, my brothers and my father too, they always liked to go around when they were working, whether it was their job, or working on something in the house or in the garden, they were always singing and whistling. And two of my brothers – we were four brothers, but for two of them besides me, they really liked music, and they always had a guitar in the house. And always there were recordings…in those days – this was the 1940s – what you heard a lot was Andres Huesca. So, when I began playing with, when I joined the Conjunto Papaloapan that was later Candelas, we played in the style of Veracruz Port.

ELG: Yeah.

Jorge: And that’s with harp. In the old days they didn’t even use requinto. But then later they added it to the groups.

--So then, with my brothers, they had their music, and it really made an impression on me, hearing them sing. And then, before I entered military service – that was in 1956 –before that, my brother wanted to bring me to a place where a jarocho group was playing, and that was nothing less than the Conjunto Papaloapan.

ELG: Mmm.

Jorge: And in that place, the guys who made up that group were just guys from the States, from East LA—I guess one of them was from Tonaya, Jalisco, the one who sang the top part. So, that was the very first time I heard a jarocho group.

INSERT #1 -- UCLA and The Institute of Ethnomusicology  in the 1960s

Jorge: But I had begun to sing already, because I was an altar boy for many years, and the choir director that was there really liked how I sang. I sang in the novenas and services at church. Also, I always sang along when the Beatles were singing!

ELG: Mm-hmm.

Jorge: And I joined the church choir. And then, getting into the choir, well that meant that I sang two or three Masses every Sunday. I liked singing so much!

ELG: Yes!

Jorge: And then, well…I also sang as a soloist when I was in Cathedral High School. I was a soloist in the chorus there, which they called “The Glee Club,” and then later on at LACC, I also sang in the chorus.

ELG: Wow, so, lots of singing, so much singing! – And I have a comment about that, if I may. I’ve noted in my own work as a music teacher, that many young people don’t want to sing. It’s like they’re embarrassed or something, it inhibits them from singing freely, so they grow up listening to music but not singing it. And I guess I believe that really, human beings are just made to sing! –And then, just the other day you and I were talking about how, as we age, singing helps keep us young, right? It’s like a source of strength…

Jorge: It’s good for your mind because you have to learn the lyrics, and the different songs with their instruments, you have to learn to accompany yourself, accompany the songs with the chords and the music…

ELG: Yeah, yeah, it’s really important to do that…But okay, returning to your story. So then, you sang a lot, lot, lot! as a youth. And then, after high school, you mentioned that you did military service, and there you went to other countries, right?

Jorge: I was in Germany. In Heidelberg.

ELG: Mm-hmm.

Jorge: That was the headquarters of all the Armed Services in Europe. And while I was there, well, I got bit again by the bug of wanting to sing! And since I was there, well, I looked for a singing teacher, and they recommended one to me. She had been an opera singer in her day, but she was already old by then. So I studied with her while I was in Heidelberg, for almost two years I worked with that teacher. We did performances, using the wardrobe from the Heidelberg Opera Company, they lent it to me since I was singing there.

ELG: Uh-huh.

Jorge: Also, I had the pleasure of being able to join a soldiers’ chorus, they called it "The Voices of Patton." I was a soloist there too; we sang in the churches, in German churches. They invited us to sing.

ELG: So here, I want us to touch on a theme that interests me a lot. So—you have some Classical training in singing, as well as, or alongside of the training you got by singing in children’s choruses, as well as all the singing in jarocho style. In short, you have really varied vocal training and experience. So something I want to talk with you about, because like I said it interests me a lot, has to do with singing style. You mentioned Andrés Huesca, and you mentioned his singing style, his vocal style. let’s say. So let’s listen to a bit of Andrés Huesca singing "Canto a Veracruz," and then we’ll talk more about this.

clip of Andrés Huesca, “Canto a Veracruz”

~0:15-0:45

ELG: It’s a distinctive style of singing, no? He has a very recognizable voice, very much his. And now I want to go directly to another recording, one that you are going to recognize, Jorge, because you are the singer! So without further ado, here’s “La Bruja,” recorded by Conjunto Candelas in 1975, and Jorge Holguín is the main singer!

Jorge: In person!

clip of Conjunto Candelas, “La Bruja”

you can play as much of this as you like!

ELG: And so it goes. It’s another beauty, eh? – But what I wanted to remark upon, by making this musical comparison, is that it’s very obvious that your voice has a lot to do with Andrés Huesca;s way of singing, even with his actual voice. They’re very comparable. And this singing style, well, one notes how sweet it is, no? Very smooth, sweet, it has energy and a lot of feeling, but what I really want to point out, what gets my attention, is the sweetness of the vocal production. And I wonder if you’d care to comment a little on that, as well as on your training as a singer, and how it contributes to that vocal quality.

Jorge. Yes! So when I first began taking voice lessons it was here in LA. I was going to the studio of Lucía Liverette. And, well, she always, the very first thing she taught us was how to produce the voice. You have to take your breath using the diaphragm. That’s a muscle that’s in between your ribs, and you have to use it so that you can feel your lungs filling up with air. Then you have to feel the resonance, how it’s right their in your own forehead. Always feeling the resonance! And feeling that, feeling the support of having the air to produce the sound. And then…then you have to do exercises, they have to stretch the voice so that it can be heard, and so that it doesn’t sound like it’s stuck in your throat. – That was the basics that I learned, and also in Germany, it was the same.

ELG: And it’s interesting, you know, that even between these traditions that are quite different, like Classical opera singing and singing for son jarocho, it’s like good singing, good vocal production—well, it’s the same. It’s the same mechanism, no? And I think that’s really interesting, because musically those traditions are really different.

Jorge: Yes. And another thing, that when I help out with the workshops at the Centro—the Centro Cultural, you know—I always tell people that they mustn’t sing with their throats, because then…Because, look, in all these years that I’ve been singing, I have never once lost my voice or gone hoarse—never! And I’ve sung a lot. Even when I was singing three Masses a day I never got hoarse [ELG laughs] because I knew how to use my voice. So it’s that when you’re singing, if you want to sing loudly but you constrict your throat, that’s not going to work. But you do have to project. Once one of the son jarocho teachers told us when I asked him how he was able to sing so loudly, singing in the outdoors like they do, and he said, “Well, in my village we all shout at each other from one side of the village to another, and we have to project, because if we don’t know one will hear us!” – And you can hear that in the fandangos, in the recordings that those artists make. They sing like that, projecting that way.

ELG: Yeah, yeah, it’s fundamental, like, a healthy vocal production, right? Because if you do it any other way you can wreck your voice that way. And I imagine that it’s the same case with dance:

that there are healthy ways, healthy practices for dancing correctly and not messing up, for example, your ankles, or hurting some other part of your body. It’s that with dance, too, there are constant principles of good production, right?

Graciela: Yes! There’s a technique I learned at the Universidad de Guadalajara. You need to have your knees bent all the time, and more than anything, you need to not stomp with your whole weight on the floor. You do have to strike the floor, but there are ways of doing it without hurting yourself. And most dancers, well, they just stomp . It’s like they think that dancing means they have to destroy the floor, in other words! [laughs] And, well, not me…and my knees are perfect!

ELG: Wow.

Graciela: My legs…the reason that I stopped dancing was that I broke a leg, and then I lost my sense of balance because I had an ear infection; so now I have vertigo. So I don’t trust myself any more to dance and do spins and turns. No, because I never know when I’m going to have the vertigo…but my technique, my legs—it’s all there. I can even say, in optimum condition! And that’s in spite of dancing for so many years, so many performances…I’m fine, and I’ve never had problems. Among my contemporaries, they all stopped dancing because of knee problems, in the meniscus. But not me. I’ve never had problems! I’ve always tried to apply that technique, even though I danced for many years on cement. That’s how we practiced in the University Ballet—we didn’t have a dance floor.

ELG: Yeah, yeah. Well that’s a testimony, isn’t it, to the importance of good technique. In both cases, whether it’s dance or singing.

All right, we’re going to go on now to the second song that you chose, Jorge. It’s a song by Nicandro Castillo, called “la Rosa.” And I found an interesting recording of it, from the Frontera Strachwitz collection. With your permission, let’s listen to this recording for a minute or two; then we’ll talk about the reasons fro your choice. Here we go…

clip from “La Rosa,” Strachwitz recording

~0:20-0:50

ELG” And now I’m going to take another liberty, and pass directly to the recording of “La Rosa,” the same song, by Conjunto Candelas, with Jorge Holguín as the principal voice. Here we go.

clip by Conjunto Candelas, “La Rosa”

play as much of this as you like!

ELG: I couldn’t resist the the comparison, it’s just so notable…

INSERT #2: the Strachwitz Frontera Collection

ELG: So: tell us a little bit. Why did you choose this song?

Jorge: Well, it’s one that I heard played by the huasteco groups I listened from the time I was a child. One of them was this very one by Nicandro Castillo. He was another great composer, and I liked this song too. Also for the lyrics in the verses. And back when Chela and I were making eyes at each other, [all three laugh] when we were getting to know one another, I even took one of the verses and sang it as if I were singing to her. That’s why I liked it, why I liked “La Rosa.” [laughs]

ELG: So you were flirting within the group, during the performances by the group you two were flirting!

Jorge: Yup. She was my Rosa.

Graciela: And I was dancing, and I’d turn to look at him, right? Me dancing there, and he  was singing…PLEASE JOIN THESE TWO CLIPS

ELG: That must have made quite a spectacle, no? I can just imagine! Ahh, that’s magical…So, then, Jorge. There’s a lot that we could talk about, and we will talk about it, I’m sure. But just to bring our chat today to a close, I want to move on to the two sones you mentioned to me. You mentioned “La Guacamaya,” the son that goes by that name, as a musical image or representation of your origins. And you gave me written material about it, where you said, and I quote,” For me, it represents Nature, animals, and plants.” Do you want to speak a little more for those who are listening, about this son, and how it is that Veracruzan son has this very special relation with Nature, right?

Jorge: Yes, so I like the version—I don’t know if it’s the one you have chosen—but the version I like is the one by Lino Chávez. So when Lino Chávez came to LA, we invited him to gatherings in the house of one of the guys. And after that, he taught the fellow who played requinto with us, that was Roberto Chagolla, who didn’t speak much Spanish because he was raised in East LA and his mother was from Arizona; and they spoke English, not Spanish, in their home. But…

ELG: Uh-huh.

Jorge: But anyway, Roberto had a lot of facility, from playing requinto romántico. And he liked the requinto jarocho, and with Lino, when Lino came he taught him. So Lino, for me, he’s the father of all requinto players, at least for requinto jarocho.

ELG: Uh-huh.

Jorge: That’s why I asked for this version of “La Guacamaya. If you play it, make sure you play his solo!

clip of Son de la Guacamaya, with the solo by Lino Chávez

fade in at ~2:00 (captures the requinto solo, which Jorge wanted)

Jorge: His famous solo! [laughs]

ELG Yes! Really cool, his way of playing. I totally agree with you.

Jorge: He also recorded with Tlen-Huicani, he also recorded with them.

Graciela: And wasn’t Lino missing a finger? isn’t that right?

Jorge: He played, he began as a violinist, he played violin. But he hurt his hand at work, he chopped off part of a finger. And I don’t know how…how he was able to play like that, with such speed.

ELG: No, you can’t hear it at all, he’s compensated completely…

And then, the song you chose to represent your hopes for the future. I think you chose really well, with “La Bamba.” You said, and I quote, that “it can be adapted to any occasion, and it’s really lively.” And in this case, I think that’s a good description of the two of you—you adapt to any occasion, and you’re very lively! [laughs]

So I think we’ll end this interview with “La Bamba.” Before we play it, do you have any comments about this son?

Jorge: Yes, so it seems to me about this son, that almost all fandangos end with “La Bamba.”

ELG: Mm-hmm.

Jorge: So I chose it for that—because it’s so lively, and it ends things…

Graciela: That’s true for dance programs too.

ELG: Mm-hmm. Yeah, both the dance and the music are equally lively and striking, right? It’s another Mexican musical icon, no? Especially of Veracruz.

So I have here the recording by Lino Chávez’s group, Conjunto Medellín…and then, before we end the interview, I do want to thank both of you so very much for your patience, your good spirits, and your wonderful personal histories. I’m serious when I say that I think we’ve only begun the conversation with this interview. There’s so much to talk about!

clip by Conjunto Medellín, Son de la Bamba.

go back as far as necessary from the end of the interview to start it here, let us hear a few seconds of it, and then keep it playing under our voices as we say goodbye. The interview should end about 20 seconds before the music clip does. This uses more than 30 sec of music but we can get away with it I think.

ELG: And there we are! Okay: thank you,  thank you so much, a thousand times. And please have a lovely afternoon.

Jorge y Graciela: The same to you, you too!

ELG: We’ll be in touch.

Jorge: Okay.

ELG: Great.

Jorge & Graciela: Have a good one.

ELG: Okay, a hug to you both.

Graciela: And to you!

ELG: Yes, ciao!

Español

Elisabeth: Entonces, volvemos la mirada virtual a tí, Jorge. Y quiero explicar a los oyentes que hemos trabajado un buen tiempo, hace algunos años ya, como integrantes de un grupito de son jarocho aquí en Santa Ana. Así que tomo la libertad de tutear a don Jorge… Entonces si puedes empezar, tal como hicimos con la maestra, nomás presentarte un poco a la audiencia, tu nombre completo y unos datos sobre tu vida.


Jorge: Bueno, voy a empezar... Para empezar, mi nombre en mi acta de nacimiento es Ricardo Jorge Holguín.


Elisabeth: Mmm.


Jorge: Y lo que pasó es que mi mamá quería que me llamara Ricardo, mi papá Jorge, o George en inglés, pues. Vivíamos en El Paso, El Paso Tejas. Y entonces cómo me siguieron llamando George, cuando nació mi hermano, a él le llamaron Ricardo. Eso es, que él es Ricardo, yo soy Ricardo Jorge. Pero se me quedó. Se me quedó George!


Elisabeth: [se ríe]


Jorge: --Jorge. Y pues nos [fuimos] para Los Ángeles cuando yo tenía seis años. Es que yo me crió aquí, en el, en Boyle Heights. Y ahí, ahí, pues, mis hermanos y mi papá también le gustaba siempre, cuando estaba trabajando, fuera su trabajo o en la casa, o en el jardín, siempre andaba cantando, chiflando, mi papá. Y mis hermanos, que eran dos hermanos -- fuimos cuatro hermanos -- pero [a] dos de ellos aparte de mí, le gustaban mucho la música. Y mis hermanos siempre tenían guitarra en la casa. Y siempre con las grabaciones de... En esos tiempos -- eran en los 40s -- y entonces [lo] que se oía mucho era Andrés Huesca. Por eso cuando yo empecé a tocar con, me integré yo con el Conjunto Papaloapan y después Candelas, era el estilo del Puerto de Veracruz. Y este--


Elisabeth: Sí.


Jorge: -- es con arpa. Antes ni siquiera tocaban requinto, pero entonces también entregaron el requinto.

Entonces con mis hermanos, ellos tenían la música, pues yo también me le pegaba ahí, escuchándolos a ellos cantar. Y entonces antes de entrar al servicio militar, que fue en el '56, antes de eso mi hermano me quería llevar a un sitio donde estaba tocando un conjunto jarocho que era el Papaloapan, Conjunto Papaloapan.


Elisabeth: Mmm.


Jorge: Y en ese lugar, los muchachos que formaban ese grupo eran solamente muchachos de aquí, del este de Los Ángeles, y uno de ellos sí era de Tonaya, Jalisco. El que cantaba la primera voz. Y ese, ese fue la primera vez que escuché un conjunto jarocho. 


INSERT #1 -- UCLA and The Institute of Ethnomusicology  in the 1960s

Jorge: Pero yo empecé a cantar, porque yo como fui monaguillo muchos años, y éste, él que estaba, el Kuvira, le gustaba mucho como que cantaba yo. Siempre cantaba cuando estaban cantando Los Beatles. Cantaba en las novenas o los servicios.


Elisabeth: Mm-hmm.


Jorge: Y me integró al coro. Y entonces, entonces entrando al coro, hasta cantaba yo dos, tres misas cada domingo, que me gustaba tanto cantar. Y...


Elisabeth: Sí.


Jorge: Entonces, pero... Canté yo como solista también cuando estaba yo en la Cathedral High School, yo era solista del coro, que se llamaba The Glee Club, y también en LACC, también canté con el coro.


Elisabeth: Entonces muchísimo canto, ¡muchísimo canto! --Un comentario si puedo. Yo he notado en mi propio trabajo como maestra de música que muchos jóvenes no quieren cantar. Es que hay un recato o algo así, que les cohíbe al cantar libremente, y crecen escuchando la música, pero no cantando. Y yo creo que realmente, los seres humanos ¡estamos hechos para cantar! Y justo el otro día estábamos tú y yo comentando de que, con la edad, es que el canto sirve para mantenerse más joven, ¿no? Es como una fuerza.


Jorge: Es bueno para la mente porque tiene uno que aprender versos, diferentes canciones con los instrumentos, aprender a acompañar, acompañar las canciones, los acordes, la música.


Elisabeth: Sí, sí, sí, es muy importante. Pero bueno. Volviendo a tu historia. Entonces cantando mucho, mucho, mucho, como joven. Y luego, después de la secundaria, mencionaste que hiciste servicio militar y pasaste a otros países ¿verdad?


Jorge: Estuvo en Alemania, en Heidelberg.


Elisabeth: Mm-hmm.


Jorge: Allí es el headquarters de todos los servicios en Europa. Y mientras estaba ahí, pues también, me dio también, me picó otra vez por querer cantar. Y estando allá, pues busqué una maestra que me recomendaron de canto. Ella era cantante de ópera en sus tiempos, pero ya estaba grande la señora. Pero estudié con ella mientras estuve allá casi dos años, estuve estudiando con esa maestra. Y hacía presentaciones y usábamos el vestuario de la compañía de ópera de ahí de Heidelberg, me lo prestaban porque como, como cantaba ahí.


Elisabeth: Anjá.


Jorge: Y también, tuve el gusto también de haberme integrado a un coro de soldados, que era "The Voices of Patton." Y también yo era el solista también, y cantábamos en las iglesias, iglesias alemanas. También nos invitaban.


Elisabeth: Pues con esto quiero pasar por un ratito a un tema que me interesa mucho.  Entonces tienes alguna formación clásica de canto encima o al lado de la formación de cantar con un niño en coros, y de cantar en el estilo jarocho. Una formación y una experiencia vocal muy variada. Y una cosa que quiero hablar un poco contigo porque, como digo, me interesa mucho: tiene que ver con la manera de cantar. Mencionaste a Andrés Huesca y se nota en comparación su manera de cantar. Su estilo vocal, digamos. Escuchamos un ratito de  Andrés Huesca cantando "Canto a Veracruz," y luego hablamos un poco más.

 

clip de Andrés Huesca, “Canto a Veracruz”

 


Elisabeth: Es un estilo de cantar muy distinto, ¿no? Tiene una voz muy reconocible, muy, muy suya. Y yo quiero en este momento pasar directamente a otra grabación que tú, Jorge, vas a reconocer porque eres el cantante. Y sin más, a ésta, es "La Bruja," por el Conjunto Candelas en mil novecientos setenta y cinco, y ¡Jorge Holguín es la voz principal!


Jorge: ¡En persona!

 

clip de Conjunto Candelas, “La Bruja”



Elisabeth: Y así va. Otra belleza, ¿no? Pero la cosa que quería comentar, al hacer esta comparación musical: está muy, muy obvio que tu voz tiene mucho que ver con la manera de cantar y con la voz misma de Andrés Huesca. Son muy comparables. Y este estilo de canto, se nota como la dulzura que tiene, ¿no? es muy suave, es dulce, tiene energía, tiene mucha emoción, pero lo que quiero señalar, lo que a mí llama mi atención, es la dulzura de la producción vocal. Y me pregunto si quieres comentar un poco sobre sobre esto, y sobre tu formación como cantante y cómo se contribuye a esta calidad vocal.


Jorge: Sí, cuando yo primero empecé clases vocales fue aquí en Los Ángeles. Estaba yendo a un estudio de Lucía Liverette. Y entonces ella siempre, lo primero que nos enseñaba es ¡cómo se produce la voz! Que uno debe tomar el aliento, usando el diafragma. Es un músculo que está en el medio de las costillas y tiene uno que usar eso para sentir que se llenen los pulmones de aire. Entonces tiene que sentir la resonancia, como que está en la mera frente de uno. Siempre siente una resonancia. Y sintiendo eso, sintiendo el apoyo de tener el viento para producir el sonido. Entonces, entonces…tiene que hacer ejercicios, que tiene que alargar la voz para que se oiga, para que no se oiga que está en la garganta. Eso fue lo básico que aprendí, también cuando estaba en Alemania. También lo mismo.


Elisabeth: Y se nota, se nota, creo, que entre tradiciones bien diferentes, como el canto clásico de ópera, el canto de son jarocho, es que el buen canto, la buena producción de la voz es la misma. Es el mismo mecanismo, ¿no? Y esto creo que es muy interesante, porque las tradiciones musicalmente son muy distintas.



Jorge: Sí, bueno, una de las cosas también, que siempre cuando yo ayudo con los talleres, allí en el centro, Centro Cultural, es que siempre, siempre les digo que no deben de cantar con la garganta, porque entonces... Porque yo, yo en todos mis años que he cantado, jamás me he puesto ronco, ¡jamás! Y he cantado mucho. Hasta tres misas los domingos cantaba, y nunca me ponía ronco [ELG se ríe] porque sabía como usar mi voz. Y también cuando uno canta, en lugar de querer cantar fuerte y aprieta la garganta, pues eso no funciona. Tienen uno que proyectar. Y nos dijo eso uno de los maestros [de son] que le pregunté, que cómo le hacen para cantar tan fuerte y cantar al aire libre. Me dice, pues, "Ahí en mi pueblo todos nos gritamos de un lado a otro y tenemos que proyectar, porque si no, no nos escuchamos.” Y eso se oye en los fandangos, cuando se oyen las grabaciones que hacen ellos, así cantan ellos, así proyectando.

Elisabeth: Sí, sí. Sí, es fundamental, la producción vocal, como, saludable, ¿verdad? Porque de otra manera uno uno puede estropear una voz, así. Y me imagino que en el caso del baile es igual. Es que existen modos saludables, prácticas saludables para bailar correctamente y no estropear, por ejemplo, los tobillos o lastimar alguna parte del cuerpo. Es que también con el baile hay principios constantes de la buena producción. Verdad?


Graciela: Sí, hay una técnica que yo aprendí en la Universidad de Guadalajara. Debe tener siempre las rodillas flexionadas y más que nada, no darle con toda el alma al piso. Tiene uno que darle, pero hay una forma de pegar sin que se lastime uno. Y la mayoría, pues nomás le pegan. Creen que bailar quiere decir acabar con el piso, en otras palabras, ¿verdad? [se ríe] Y yo no.. Mis rodillas están perfectas.

Elisabeth: Guau.


Graciela: Mis piernas...La razón que yo dejé de bailar fue cuando me fracturé la pierna. Perdí completamente el balance porque tengo también una infección en el oído y me da vértigo. No, no confío yo en bailar y dar vueltas. ¡No! Porque yo no sé cuando voy a tenerlo. Pero la técnica, mis piernas-- todo está. Puedo decir, ¡en óptimas condiciones! a pesar de tantos años de bailar, tantas funciones. Estoy bien. Yo nunca he tenido problemas. 

De mis contemporáneos, todos dejaron de bailar por problemas con las rodillas, los meniscos; y yo no. Jamás he tenido problemas. Siempre he tratado de aplicar esa técnica y bailé muchos años en el cemento. Allí era donde practicábamos con la Universidad de Guadalajara. No teníamos salón de danza. Si.


Elisabeth: Sí, sí. Pues es un testimonio, ¿no? A la importancia de la buena técnica. En ambos casos, sea del baile o del canto. 

Bueno, pasamos ahorita a la segunda canción que elegiste, Jorge. Es una canción de Nicandro Castillo que se llama "La Rosa." Y yo he encontrado una grabación en YouTube bastante interesante. Es de la colección Frontera Strachwitz. Y con tu permiso escuchamos un minuto o dos de esta grabación y luego hablaremos un poco de los porques de tu elección. Aquí vamos.

 

clip de “La Rosa,” Strachwitz recording

 

Elisabeth: Y otra vez voy a tomar una libertad, y pasar a la grabación de Conjunto Candelas de "La Rosa," la misma canción, con Jorge Holguín, como voz principal.  Aquí va.

 

clip de Conjunto Candelas, “La Rosa”

 

Elisabeth: No podría resistir la comparación porque es muy, es muy notable. 

 

INSERT #2: the Strachwitz Frontera Collection

 

ELG: Pero bueno…Cuéntanos un poco. ¿Por qué has elegido esta canción?


Jorge: Bueno, es una que escuchaba yo, con los grupos huastecos que escuchaba desde niño. Y uno de ellos también era este de Nicandro Castillo. También fue un gran compositor y me gustaba ésta también. También por la letra, allí en los versos. Que cuando Chela y yo nos estábamos echando ojitos, [lxs 3 se ríen] nos estamos conociendo. Y pués, hasta aplicaba yo uno de los versos también como que le estaba cantando a ella, y por eso me gustaba. Me gustaba "La Rosa." [se ríe]


Elisabeth: Así que cortejando dentro del conjunto, dentro de las presentaciones del conjunto, ustedes estaban cortejándose. 


Jorge: Sí. Era mi Rosa. [lxs dos se ríen]


Graciela: Yo bailaba y también volteaba a verlo, ¿verdad? Yo bailando ahí, y él cantando. PLEASE JOIN THESE TWO CLIPS


Elisabeth: Qué espectáculo debe haber sido, ¿no? Puedo imaginar. Ay qué encanto! Bueno, entonces, Jorge. Hay mucho en que podríamos hablar y vamos a hablar, seguro. Pero nomás para cerrar un poco nuestra plática de hoy, quiero pasar a los dos sones que mencionaste. Mencionaste "La guacamaya," el Son de la Guacamaya, como imagen musical o representación de tus orígenes. Y en las materias escritas que me diste, dice, "Para mí representa la naturaleza, los animalitos, y la vegetación." Quieres hablar un poco más, para los que escuchan, sobre este son y cómo es que el son veracruzano tiene -- una relación muy especial con la naturaleza, ¿verdad?


Jorge: Sí, a mí me gustó la versión, no sé si es la que tienes tú, pero la que me gusta es con Lino Chávez. Es que Lino Chávez, cuando venía a Los Ángeles, lo invitábamos a convivios en la casa de uno de los muchachos. Entonces, le enseñó al muchacho que tocaba de requinto con nosotros, que era Roberto Chagolla. Él no hablaba muy bien el español porque se crió en el Este de Los Ángeles y su mamá era de Arizona, y ellos hablaban en su casa. No hablaban español, más inglés. Pero...


Elisabeth: Anjá.


Jorge: Bueno, entonces él, él tenía la facilidad de que tocaba un poquito de requinto romántico. Y le gustó el requinto jarocho, y con Lino, cuando vino le enseñó a él. Y Lino para mí es el papá de los requinteros, para requinto jarocho. Y --



Elisabeth: Anjá.


Jorge: Por eso esta versión de "La guacamaya." Sí, sí. Si lo tocas, por favor, ¡espere que toque su solo!

 

clip del Son de la Guacamaya, con el solo de Lino Chávez

 


Jorge: ¡Su famoso solo! [se ríe]


Elisabeth: Sí. Bien chido, su manera de tocar. Estoy muy de acuerdo.


Jorge: Él también grabó con Tlen-Huicani. También grabó con ellos.


Graciela:  Y le faltaba un dedo, ¿verdad? a Lino.


Jorge: Él tocaba, él empezó como violinista, tocaba violín. Y se lastimó como en el trabajo. Se mochó parte de un dedo. Pero, pero así yo no sé cómo… como él hacía para atacarte con tanta velocidad.


Elisabeth: No, no se escucha para nada, se ha compensado totalmente.

 Y luego a la canción que elegiste para representar las esperanzas para el futuro. Elegiste muy bien, creo, y es el son de "La Bamba" y dijiste que "se adapta para toda ocasión y es muy alegre." Y en este caso, creo que es una buena descripción de ustedes dos. Se adaptan para todas ocasiones [se ríe] y ¡son muy alegres!

Creo que vamos a cerrar la entrevista con el son de "La Bamba.” Antes de tocarla, ¿hay algún comentario sobre éste son?


Jorge: Sí, pues se me hace que con este, con este son, casi todos los fandangos cierran con "La Bamba."


Elisabeth: Mm-hmm.


Jorge: Fue por lo mismo, porque es tan alegre y quieren cerrar...


Graciela: Sí, los programas de baile también.


Elisabeth: Mm-hmm. Sí, es igual de alegre y llamativo de baile y de música, ¿verdad? Es como icono musical de México, ¿no? Y sobretodo de Veracruz.

 Pues tengo aquí ante mí [la grabación de] el Conjunto Medellín de Lino Chávez…Y luego, antes de cerrar la entrevista, es que quiero agradecerles enormemente su paciencia, su buen ánimo, sus historias tan preciosas. Y estoy en serio, creo que nomás hemos empezado la plática con esta entrevista. Hay tanto que hablar…

 

clip del Conjunto Medellín, Son de la Bamba. 


Elisabeth: Y ya estamos. Bueno, gracias, gracias, mil gracias y que pasen una bonita tarde.


Jorge & Graciela: Igualmente. También Usted. 


Elisabeth: Estamos en contacto.


Jorge: Okay.


Elisabeth: Muy bien.


Jorge & Graciela: Que la pases bien.


Elisabeth: Bueno, un abrazo a los dos.


Graciela: Igualmente.


Elisabeth: Sí, ¡chao!

English


SUMMARY OF RESEARCH SOURCES

The great majority of sources about twentieth-century Mexican music in Los Angeles are in English. In order not to present two very different-sized bibliographies, we have combined them here into a single document.


Mariachi & Son jarocho in LA & at UCLA


Alexandro Hernández, “The Son Jarocho and Fandango Amidst Struggle and Social Movements:Migratory Transformation and Reinterpretation of the Son Jarocho in La Nueva España, México, and the United States. “ PhD Dissertation, UCLA. 2014


Loza, Steven. Barrio Rhythm: Mexican American Music in Los Angeles. Vol. 517. University of Illinois Press, 1993.

 

----------------- "From Veracruz to Los Angeles: The Reinterpretation of the" Son Jarocho"." Latin American Music Review/Revista de Música Latinoamericana 13.2 (1992): 179-194.


Maureen Russell, “Highlights from the Ethnomusicology Archive: Music of Mexico Ensemble.” Nov. 2012 https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/highlights-ethnomusicology-archive-music-mexico-ensemble


----------------------“Special Guest: Dr. Robert Saxe and the Music of Mexico Ensemble, 1964” -- Ethnomusicology Review

https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/special-guest-dr-robert-saxe-and-music-mexico-ensemble-1964


Salazar, Lauryn Camille. "From Fiesta to Festival: Mariachi Music in California and the Southwestern United States." PhD diss., UCLA, 2011.

https://www.proquest.com/docview/919079833?accountid=14512


El Ballet Folklórico

“Emilio Pulido Interview, 1999) -- USC Digital Library

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/digital/collection/p15799coll105/id/1589/rec/1


“A History of Mexican Folklórico in Southern California” -- The Dance History Project of Southern California

http://www.dancehistoryproject.org/articles/culture-and-context/world-arts-culture-context/a-history-of-mexican-folorico-in-southern-california/


“Grupo Folklorico de UCLA” -- gfdeUCLA.com

https://www.gfdeucla.com


“The Role of Folklorico and Danzantes Unidos in the Chican@ Movement” -- Eve Marie Delfin

https://escholarship.org/uc/item/6mw0n3x9


El Mestizaje

A great deal has been written (and debated) around this theme; even a representative bibliography is not within the scope of this document. We offer here just a couple of classic sources, in which the idea of Mexican national identity as a “mixture” was developed.


José Vasconcelos. La Raza Cósmica. Misión de la raza iberoamericana. Notas de viajes a la América del Sur. (1925) Madrid, Spain : Aguilar, 1966.

Bilingual edition:

Cosmic race: a bilingual edition. Translated and annotated by Didier T. Jaén 

Baltimore, Maryland : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997


Octavio Paz. El laberinto de la soledad. (1950) ed. por Anthony Stanton. Manchester University Press/ Palgrave, 2008.

English translation:

The labyrinth of solitude: life and thought in Mexico, by Octavio Paz. Translated by Lysander Kemp. New York : Grove Press, 1961.



Español


RESUMEN DE FUENTES DE INVESTIGACIÓN


La gran mayoría de las fuentes sobre la historia de la música mexicana en el s.XX en Los Ángeles son anglófonas. Para no presentar dos bibliografías muy desiguales, las hemos combinado aquí en un solo documento.


Mariachi & Son jarocho in LA & at UCLA


Alexandro Hernández, “The Son Jarocho and Fandango Amidst Struggle and Social Movements:Migratory Transformation and Reinterpretation of the Son Jarocho in La Nueva España, México, and the United States. “ PhD Dissertation, UCLA. 2014


Loza, Steven. Barrio Rhythm: Mexican American Music in Los Angeles. Vol. 517. University of Illinois Press, 1993.

 

----------------- "From Veracruz to Los Angeles: The Reinterpretation of the" Son Jarocho"." Latin American Music Review/Revista de Música Latinoamericana 13.2 (1992): 179-194.


Maureen Russell, “Highlights from the Ethnomusicology Archive: Music of Mexico Ensemble.” Nov. 2012 https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/highlights-ethnomusicology-archive-music-mexico-ensemble


----------------------“Special Guest: Dr. Robert Saxe and the Music of Mexico Ensemble, 1964” -- Ethnomusicology Review

https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/special-guest-dr-robert-saxe-and-music-mexico-ensemble-1964


Salazar, Lauryn Camille. "From Fiesta to Festival: Mariachi Music in California and the Southwestern United States." PhD diss., UCLA, 2011.

https://www.proquest.com/docview/919079833?accountid=14512


El Ballet Folklórico

“Emilio Pulido Interview, 1999) -- USC Digital Library

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/digital/collection/p15799coll105/id/1589/rec/1


“A History of Mexican Folklórico in Southern California” -- The Dance History Project of Southern California

http://www.dancehistoryproject.org/articles/culture-and-context/world-arts-culture-context/a-history-of-mexican-folorico-in-southern-california/


“Grupo Folklorico de UCLA” -- gfdeUCLA.com

https://www.gfdeucla.com


“The Role of Folklorico and Danzantes Unidos in the Chican@ Movement” -- Eve Marie Delfin

https://escholarship.org/uc/item/6mw0n3x9


El Mestizaje

Se ha escrito (y discutido) muchísimo en torno a este tema; ni siquiera una bibliografía representativa esté al alcance de este documento. Ofrecemos nomás un par de fuentes clásicas, en las cuales se desarrollaba la idea de la identidad nacional mexicana como mestiza.


José Vasconcelos. La Raza Cósmica. Misión de la raza iberoamericana. Notas de viajes a la América del Sur. (1925) Madrid, Spain : Aguilar, 1966.

Bilingual edition:

Cosmic race: a bilingual edition. Translated and annotated by Didier T. Jaén 

Baltimore, Maryland : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997


Octavio Paz. El laberinto de la soledad. (1950) ed. por Anthony Stanton. Manchester University Press/ Palgrave, 2008.

English translation:

The labyrinth of solitude: life and thought in Mexico, by Octavio Paz. Translated by Lysander Kemp. New York : Grove Press, 1961.




Canto A Veracruz - Andrés Huesca

La Rosa - Nicandro Castillo