Episodio / Episode #
13
September 10, 2021

Diana Morales

English

Español

English

Greetings and welcome to the latest episode of “Si yo fuera una canción”  -- “If I Were a Song.” We are a community-based podcast and radio show, in which people of Santa Ana, California, tell us in their own words about the music that means the most to them. 

ELG: I am Elisabeth Le Guin, your program host, and Director of this project.

 This project is based on my conviction that we people in the modern world need to learn to listen to one another; and that music, and all it brings us, is the perfect place to begin. 

DAVID: My name is David Castañeda, music researcher here for the SYFUC podcast. I am so happy to be a part of this project, using my scholarly training and my performance experience to bring you the stories, music, and lived experiences of those living right here in Santa Ana

ELG: So, Diana, welcome. I'm so thrilled to have you here to do an interview with me, and it's for me also a chance to get to know you a little bit. So why don't we start out with you just introducing yourself, as you would like our listeners to know you. Tell us your name. Tell us -- if you're comfortable, tell us your age, and anything about what it is that you do, where you are in your life, that you think will help the listeners get to know you a little bit.

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, so thank you for having me. My name is Diana Morales. I was originally born in Santa Cruz Tanaco, Michoacán, and I'm currently living in Santa Ana. So I feel like that's for me, where I identify as coming into Santa Ana, being a santanera, and then also having that background of coming from Michoacán. So myself, now, in the present, what I'm doing is mostly, I'm a digital illustrator that makes P'urhépecha art. And that for me, really, is to tell more stories about who I am, or stories about where my family comes from, and to be able to share our culture.

 

ELG: Hmm. What age were you when you came to Santa Ana?

 

Diana Morales: So I was about to be five years old. I don't remember much about México.

 

ELG: So you have not had the opportunity to go back.

 

Diana Morales: No, so I'm not able to, because I have DACA.

 

ELG: Ah yeah. Yeah, I'm sorry for that. And of course, you mentioned P'urhépecha art, and... Tell us a little bit, if you will, about that. That is your heritage, correct?

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, so P'urhépecha is a culture, an indigenous culture that is located within Michoacán. And within this region, there's four different regions that make up P'urépecha territory. And so they're -- they're kind of divided and they're known as the [¿Hill?] region, Sierra region, Valley region. And there's another region that I can't remember…

 

ELG: Mmm.

 

Diana Morales: But those are the regions that are considered to be provincial territory. And then from there, there's a lot of migration that has happened, either outwards into the rest of Mexico and then outwards here to the US.

 

ELG: Yeah, that's right, the kind of multiple layers of migration, right?

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

 

ELG: Is -- forgive my ignorance, is Michoacán kind of like ground zero for the P'urhépecha people? Is that kind of the main concentration of of that nation, if you will, within Mexico?

 

Diana Morales: Yeah. Yeah, so that would be considered our native and traditional territory.

 

ELG: Wow. Well, I do -- I hope for you that you get a chance to go back as soon as possible.

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, I hope so, too.

 

ELG: It's very cool that you're maintaining that connection, even though by force you have to stay here -- far from that land.

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

 

ELG: I've taken a little look at your art, you have a lovely website, and you have a presence on Instagram and we will be sure to link to those things when your episode comes out. It's really cool what you're doing. So you said it's digital art, right? I didn't realize that, but it's -- it doesn't look digital in the sense that it looks very earthy and --how should I put it? -- Kind of solid. And these beautiful images of women with beautiful background colors, and... How do you see your art? What kind of work do you see your art doing in this urban setting in which we are living right now?

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, thank you so much for the compliment. I do definitely feel that one of the main figures that I try to include in my art is always mujeres [women]. Especially for me because there's women, P'urhépecha women, that I really look up to, that I really admire. And that for me have been those people that I needed, you know, to look towards, for people who are culture bearers of P'urhépecha culture and here in the US being so far away from our territorios. And so, you know, growing up in Santa Ana, it's a very urban space. There's some community gardens here which I feel have been the place for me to kind of reach out to and be able to reconnect with what it what it meant for my family in the territorios to be growing milpas, to be growing cempasúchitl, all kinds of quelites. And so I feel like my art is a way to to visualize, all of that, traditional ways of growing, growing semillas. And some of those semillas do come with us, like those are seeds that we bring with us through migration. And so I like to think that our traditional ways aren't ending. They're not necessarily endangered. There's a lot of ways that we try to preserve that.

 

ELG: That's right, and yes, so many neat things in what you're saying there. You're referring to the, what's often called the Granjita, right here in Santa Ana.

 

Diana Morales: Yes.

 

_____

INSERT #1.

DC: If you'd like to know a little bit more about La Granjita, listen to Episode 10. In that episode, Elisabeth talks to Abel Ruiz, who runs the Santa Ana Granjita, and [who] explains the human importance of gardens and the tensions between idealism and safety.

________

ELG. You know, just that the idea of seeds, of semillas, the way they -- I mean, every semilla carries a plant inside of it, you know, that will, under the right conditions, it will grow and flourish and become new life. And I mean, what a wonderful metaphor for the whole idea of migration. That, you know, seeds are like portable, right? They're super portable, most of them, and they can go to all kinds of places, and if the conditions are right, they'll grow and they'll take root and they'll make this new ecosystem. And that's a lot like what happens when people migrate and bring their culture with them.

 

Diana Morales: Hmm, yes.

 

ELG: It's very cool that you're bringing that forward in your art and in what you do. I admire it a lot.

 

Diana Morales: Thank you. Thank you so much.

 

ELG: So. Let's go to the first of the two songs that you shared with me,  the one that is expressing or representing in some way where you come from, which is a phrase that is deliberately  a bit open and vague, like, "Where do you come from?" That can mean geography, but it can also mean culture, it can mean state of mind. And so, if you will just tell us a little bit about this song, what its name is, and then we'll listen to it.

 

Diana Morales: Okay, so the first song that for me reminds me so much about where I'm from, is this song called "Adios California." And so the literal translation is Goodbye California. [chuckles] And so I chose this song because this is a song that I grew up hearing all of the time, like literally, every Sunday.

 

ELG: Mm hmm.

 

Diana Morales: And so what this song basically is saying is, that it's talking in the perspective of someone who is P'urhepecha and has migrated to California, and then for some unexpected reason, has to leave California and go back to to their pueblo.

 

ELG: Mm hmm.

 

Diana Morales: And so this is a song that I grew up always hearing. And it reminds me of my parents' experience, right? Because for them, they've always told me that they have plans of someday going back to their pueblos after we're all graduated from college, after we all have jobs and we study...

 

 

ELG: Mm hmm.

 

Diana Morales: That is the hope, to one day return back to the pueblo. And so this song being present, you know, throughout all of my life, I think it's a song that many, many P'urhépecha folks who are out here in the diaspora recognize. Yeah. And it's a beautiful song.

 

ELG: Cool. OK, let's listen to it.

 

MUSIC CLIP # 1

La Banda de Zirahuén, “Adiós California”

 

ELG: So -- they don't sound too unhappy about leaving California.

 

 

Diana Morales: No, no, they don't! It's actually a very, very happy song, and I heard it a lot, too, during the fiestas that we would do here in Santana.  And so it was a song that, when everybody knew you, you have to go out and dance it.

 

 

ELG: Uh huh, uh huh. And so you mentioned before we played it, you mentioned that this song is a little bit of an anthem for the P'urhépecha community here. And I know there is such a community in the L.A. area, and maybe you could tell us a little bit more, just kind of about... Is Santa Ana a major center for the P'urépecha diaspora here? Or is it in another part of L.A.?

 

Diana Morales: So from what I know, is that between Santa Ana and L.A., there has been documented about 700 families that are part of the diaspora.

 

ELG: Wow.

 

Diana Morales: And then specifically in Santa Ana and Costa Mesa is where you can find folks that come from the pueblo that I come from, in Santa Cruz Tanaco.

 

ELG: Mm hmm.

 

Diana Morales: And so it is known back in the pueblo that Santa Ana is one of the cities that we come and migrate to. And then other places that I also know of are, for example, up in Salinas, which is a strawberry growing field. And so that's also one of the main reasons that folks migrate out into the central coast of California: for farmworker jobs.

 

ELG: Right. Oh, man, picking strawberries, I am told, and I can well imagine, is one of the hardest forms of field labor because they're down so low. Right?

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Yeah.

 

ELG: So you just -- you're bent over the whole time. So, yeah, I could imagine leaving a job like that behind --

 

Diana Morales: And being happy about it! [laughs]

 

ELG: Yeah, exactly. Exactly.

 

Diana Morales: Yeah. Another part that's within the song is the fact that the singer is saying that he received a letter, and that that's the reason that he has to go back to his pueblo. And so sometimes too, that could be interpreted as someone who's out here in the U.S. receiving a letter from a family member that, for example, someone is sick or that a relative of his dying. And so that's also something that I think about a lot, and some conversations that I've had within my own family, of folks that they miss, friends who they haven't seen in the longest time or even like our, my grandmother -- I only have one maternal grandmother who's living, and then one great grandmother on my dad's side who's living. And so I also think about that, like, what news would be so, so drastic that would make us want to immediately leave and be a reason to go.

 

ELG: Right, right, and it would be drastic news, wouldn't it, because if you left, you couldn't come back.

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Yeah.

 

ELG: It would mean really just essentially dropping your life. And...yeah, that is a condition that many people that I know, here in Santa Ana and in the south part of California, you know, live with this every day.

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

 

ELG: And it's interesting. I... I have enjoyed freedom of movement across borders all my life until the last year and a half, when a global pandemic made that very difficult and in many cases impossible. And it's just a funny thing that although many of my friends are undocumented and it's an issue that I take very seriously and have strong feelings and opinions about, -- I don't think I ever really knew in my heart what it felt like, until I realized that I could not go and visit my daughter who lives in Canada.

That that actually was not an option, even if she were having a really bad time or in danger of death or something, I would not have been able to visit her.

 

And that -- when I realized that, it was one of the strongest moments in the pandemic for me, was realizing, "Ah! OK, now I get a little taste of what so many of my friends and acquaintances live with every day." It's been a a teacher in that way, I would say.

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, yeah, there's definitely a lot of changes that need to happen and changes waiting to happen for the longest of times.

 

ELG: Yes... Yes, indeed. Well, and but then: this song! Which is extremely animated and cheerful. And that's something that I deeply admire, is the way [that] out of this situation, that is really not a good situation in so many ways, that these musicians -- and in fact a whole culture -- just pulls good cheer and buen ánimo. And, you know --And, "Let's be happy, because this is what we got!"

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, [laughs] Yeah, I love that. It's a... It's an embracing of the sadness, and yet also the joy that would come with realizing that you might be able to go back to your pueblo.

 

ELG: Yeah.

 

Diana Morales: That's the complexity. Nothing is just all bad, and nothing is all just good.

 

ELG: Yeah, you're absolutely right, I mean, that song, kind of on the face of it, it sounds like very simple music and very simple lyrics, but you're absolutely right. It's not simple at all! That what it's about is really, really complex.

 

Diana Morales: Yes.

 

ELG: Yeah, that's very cool. So, yeah, we're agreed, I think, that there are a lot of important things that really need to change, and that sort of that starts to turn our thoughts a little bit toward the future where those changes might actually take place, and maybe the question of how those changes might take place. And the second song that I asked you to pick, speaks to those kinds of questions. I ask my interviewees to pick a second song that represents or expresses their hopes for the future. So -- you want to tell us a little bit about what you chose in that category?

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, so for the second song, about hope and what I would wish for in the future, I chose this song,  "Creo en ti," by Ana Tijoux. And so Ana Tijoux is a Chilean artist that I feel a lot of folks within the movement -- many movements here in the U.S. -- know. And I would say too, it's a song that gives us ánimos, in marchas, ánimos... We might feel that the things we are doing are not enough, but there's definitely changes that are happening, when we continue to do this work.

And so for me, I feel like Ana is someone who, with her words, just truly hits home! Pulls strings of my heart.

There's songs that, when I first heard about her, when I first heard some of her songs, I'd just be in tears because just everything that she was saying, I feel, I feel deeply.

 

And I also think that as an artist, she's someone who embraces so much of imagination, and claiming -- like the first lyrics that are part of this song is simply, "Creo en lo imposible." So,  "I believe in the impossible." And I feel like, for me, that -- that's me! [laughs] And then within my art, that's definitely something that I feel I'm trying to do, you know, depict these illustrations that are about joy, depict illustrations that honor my, the women within my family, P'urhépecha folks who are out here continuing to do the work, resisting in any way that they do. You know, sometimes it isn't marching and putting their lives at risk. Sometimes it's simply preserving language and doing little things like cooking traditional foods, and continuing to maintain those relationships of community. Even out here. And so I feel like this song from Ana is very much about believing in what we might think is impossible. And -- it's not! I also really love the other phrase that says, " Creo en lo imposible/que de nuestras espaldas/brotaran las alas" --

That, I believe! [laughs] I truly believe that there is magic happening within ourselves and within the spaces of community that are super healing, and that make us regain the energy and the ganas [enthusiasm] to just keep going.

 

ELG: Yeah! Oh, well, what a beautiful introduction. Let's listen to this song.

________________________________

MUSIC CLIP #2:

Ana Tijoux, “Creo en ti”

+ INSERT #2

DC: This is not the first time that you've heard about Ana Tijoux here on "Si yo fuera una canción." Marlha Sánchez also spoke about the importance of this artist, and the meaning of Tijoux's music in Marlha's life, and for many communities here in Santa Ana. All of this and more can be heard in episode 12.

 

__________________

 

ELG: So, yeah, this is a super hopeful song, but it's like really, ahh... I don't know. There's different kinds of hope, right? And sometimes hope can be a little bit sort of blind. Or not, you know -- you hope about things without thinking about them too much, because if you think about him too much, it's not, [it] doesn't feel very hopeful.

 

Diana Morales: Yeah!

 

ELG: But this is not that kind of song. I mean, Ana Tijoux is somebody who clearly thinks about things a lot.

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

 

ELG: And, you know, you mentioned how her words just go straight to your heart. I know what you mean. She chooses them well. And...yeah, tell me a little bit so that, you know, the refrán de la canción, "Creo en ti," -- "I believe in you." How does that transformation work? where by believing in someone else, you believe in yourself?

 

Diana Morales: Hmm. Uff... So I feel like, well, going back to why I chose this song, I feel like it's a song that came into my life definitely as I was immersing into the activism world and just kind of learning a lot of the histories of imperialism, of colonialism, and that being something that I had never, ever known of. You know, high school education does not teach you that!

 

ELG: No, it does not. [both laugh]

 

Diana Morales: So for me, it wasn't until after college that that I started to ask those questions, and that I started to... to almost immerse into this political identity of being Indigenous, being migrant. To, you know, say, "Undocumented, unafraid." And those movements of (almost) letting go of fear. I, like that song was present throughout all that time, all that time of transition for me in my college years.

And so thinking of the song, I also think of, you know, movements within the U.S. and Latin America that are fighting against the imperialism that is still very much present, and [is] trying to destroy communities. And so for me, this song was something that I could really hold on to. And, yeah...

 

ELG: Well, yeah. There's an interesting thing going on here. Let me see if I can get at it with you. So... There's identity politics, where people go out in the world and they try to make changes that reflect better the needs of a group that they identify with. So they can take a lot of different forms, right? And one of them has to do with ethnic identity.

And there's a there's a kind of a view out there, I would say, that identity politics has the potential to divide us even more. And we are pretty badly divided country already. But this is -- what you're talking about, it's the opposite of that. You know, "I believe in you," and therefore I believe in me. It's like -- it's an activism that is based on, I guess, empathy. Would that be the right word?

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Mm hmm.

 

ELG: And do you see that as being like a particularly Indigenous kind of activism? Or how does that work for you?

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, I mean, I feel like for me, I didn't start to see it in that way until I started being an organizer, until I started to go out and join marches and feel that I was safe within community, and to feel that, you know, we were there collectively for a reason, to hold on to that dignity.

And so, again, I feel like being, growing up in Santa Ana, you know, you're bound to come across a lot of organizing collectives. And so for me, that's where I first started to again learn this history and then ask questions about, "Well, where was I coming from?” And “What were those stories that I still had that needed to be preserved?" -- "Las historias no contadas," right? That's what Ana Tijoux says. And so I definitely question that a lot.

And then this phrase of "Creo en ti," definitely I feel it like Ana telling me -- but also, like myself, telling all the folks that I've come across that I've built community with, you know, "I believe in you. I feel safe with you. I feel like I can count on you."

And so part of my experience with community organizing in Santa Ana has been very much -- what I've talked about in the past is this cultura of helping each other out. And I definitely, definitely feel like that has roots within practices that are Indigenous, where a lot of folks are migrating from, because there's so many places that folks are coming from, and into Santa Ana. And some of it is P'urhépecha, some of it isn't. And so now in this time, at this time of my life, I feel like this "Creo en ti" has also become within my own family, [a way] of trying to have that belief in us, that we can still do a lot more. Even if it isn't being out in marches, because that's, for example, that's something that's not safe for my parents.

 

ELG: Right.

 

Diana Morales: So I think about the different ways that we can resist without having to put ourselves so much in danger, in the face of danger. And so those ways do look like -- like I was saying, you know, preserving our language. I see that as a major way of resisting. I see the work that I do of making art and preserving joy, of preserving this orgullo, of recognizing who we are, making our existence visible -- that's another another way of resisting. And so I feel like after a long journey of, you know, being in the movement, organizing, feeling fear! Fear at marches with police presence and all that stuff, I feel like that was hard. That was really hard. And it's hard to do if you don't feel like you have community there for you. And so, yeah.

 

ELG: [Yeah -- I would think it'd be almost impossible to do with without that, you know, somebody respaldando a tí [backing you up]...

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Yeah.

 

ELG: You said so many wonderful things. And I'm actually looking at the the lírica de la canción [song lyrics]. And she says, "Yo vine a compartir/con quien haya entendido/que la pelea empieza por el nido."

________________

INSERT #3

ELG: And here's a translation of those lines: "I came to share / with those who have understood /that the fight begins with the nest." -- I take that to mean, the fight begins at home.

_______________

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

 

ELG: Which sounds kind of like what you were just saying, that, you know, activism can take a lot, a lot of different forms. And getting out in the streets and marching is one, but it's only one. And staying at home and cooking amazing food could could be another one, right?

 

Diana Morales: [chuckles] Yes.

 

ELG: And then there's also the language thing, which I think is super interesting, that...so, your parents. Do they speak P'ur --  P'urhépecha, excuse me, in the home?

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, yeah, so they both, that's their native language. And then they learned Spanish later on in their life.

 

ELG: Uh huh.

 

Diana Morales: And then for me, I grew up speaking Spanish, hearing P'urhé at home, but not really practicing the response. So I'm like half, half [laughs] And then English.

 

 

ELG: Yeah, yeah. A so-called heritage speaker.

 

Diana Morales: Mm-hm. Yeah.

 

ELG: Yeah, and then there's English! And we're having this interview in English.

 

Diana Morales: [chuckles] Yes.

 

ELG: It's, you know, and it's a crazy, lovely mix, and the whole propósito [purpose] of this show is, we keep it bilingual. And we do translate every single interview, which is literally twice as much work. And that's just two languages! And then, of course, there's all these other languages. What is the figure in México? It's like, there are 87 different language groups, Indigenous language groups, just in Mexico alone, that are still being spoken, you know, on a day to day basis. It's incredibly rich. And, yeah, and stories come out different when you tell them in a different language! [both laugh]

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, yes.

 

ELG: And they come out different when you tell them in a different medium, too. So --  your storytelling is in the imagery direction.

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Yeah, so part of the reason that I do a lot of pictures and images is because, um, so... Since I don't know how to write out our language -- and then that being, first, because our language isn't a written language, it's an oral language.

 

ELG: Right.

 

Diana Morales: And so I feel like the images that I'm creating are also in reference to a lot of the ways that we would hold language, through, for example, carvings, pictografías. There's a lot of amazing designs that we have within our clothes, within like clay, clay artesanías that we still have; wood carvings. There's so, so many ways that we would share what we believed in our language.

_________

INSERT #4

ELG: Well, I got that figure wrong! The number of indigenous languages spoken in present day Mexico is not 87, it's a mere 68. Still an astonishing figure. P'urhépecha is number 15 on that list, in terms of numbers of speakers. There's about 150,000 people speaking that language as their principal language, right now in Mexico. And that number, interestingly, is growing at a rate of about 20 percent since 2005. And I like to think that the healthy state of the P'urhépecha language is in part due to migration. Radio Santa Ana, which broadcasts our show every two weeks, has a program, I think it's weekly, in P'urhépecha. It's called "La hora P'urhépecha con Aguanita Zamora," that is, "The P'urhépecha Hour, with Aguanita Zamora." And if you want to check that out, you can listen to it at RadioSantaAna.org.

 

_________

 

ELG: Yeah, how cool. Well, I hope we can maybe you can help me find some nice images that we can get onto our website, just, connected with this interview. I'd love to, you know, just be able to use it as a little bit of a platform for that.

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, I'll share some images with you.

 

ELG: That would be wonderful. So just one more question about -- it's actually a question about both songs. So, I know that there is P'urhépecha music. How do those kinds of sounds as you know them or remember them, do they turn up at all in either of the songs that you chose? Are there things that are going on in the sounds of these songs that kind of take you, sonically speaking, into this world?

 

Diana Morales: Yeah, I mean, I feel like the first one, the first song, was written by Banda Zirahuén, which is also a pueblo in in Michoacán. And so that sound of bailes, that I feel like is always a call, like it's always something that that I recognize as home.

 And so that's also part of why I chose this song, because just hearing these songs on the weekends, growing up, that always felt like home. And it's something that I wouldn't hear after I would leave my home, for example, school, or like being with friends and other public spaces. And it always was something that was like a sound of being home.

 

 

ELG: That is so cool. Yeah, so, el mero ritmo [just the rhythms], just -- like that particular rhythm that that song has. Would it have a particular name to it, do you think, as a dance?

 

Diana Morales: I'm not sure, I'm actually not sure. But I do know that these songs are pirekuas. And then the singers are pirerís. And so there have been folks who've done a little more research about the ways that certain instruments sound, wood sound like traditional instruments like flutes, and different kinds of drums that we would use in the past.

 

ELG: Yeah, yeah.

_____________

INSERT #5

NOTE: this is not a translation but discusses the same themes in each language.

 

ELG: As I've come to understand it, a Pirekua refers to any music that is sung.

 

DC: Okay.

 

ELG: And instrumental music in P'urhépecha traditions seems to come in. two basic speeds, which are slow and fast. And you can have slow instrumental music;  when it's instrumental, it's called a son. When it's sung, it's called a pirekua. You can have fast instrumental music, which is called an Abajeño. And when it's sung, it's called a Pirekua!

What I would like to do now with you, David, is just skim the barest surface of this very rich musical tradition and listen to a couple of selections. And let's just talk to each other a little bit about what we're hearing. We are outsiders to this musical tradition, but it's quite wonderful, and brings, I think, many, many things for us to talk about. -- So this is called "Abajeño para todos los que quieren bailar." That is, it's an Abajeño for everyone who wants to dance.

 

DC: To the point, I like it!

 

ELG: And it’s played by the Grand Banda de Ichán, Michoacán.

 ________

MUSIC CLIP #1, Grand Banda Ichán de Michoacán, “Abajeño para rodos los que quieren bailar”

________

 

ELG: Tell me what you're hearing there.

 

DC: So I think the first thing that really stands out to me is this six-eight rhythm, right? This rhythm underneath that, like, 123, 123, 123, 12... This is very, very common in the Americas. I would say, Central America. You hear it in Mexican mariachi and the guitarrón, the same type of thing, you hear it in Banda, lots of Banda, you hear this kind of rhythm, and it's just, it's beautiful. It's a beautiful rhythm. It's very driving. It's música alegre, a very upbeat music. --I forgot how to say "alegre" in English for some reason! I don't know if there's a direct translation. -- but very upbeat music--

 

 

ELG: I don't think there's a translation. Yeah, it's its own word, alegre.

 

DC: So it's…it's very, very specific to the new world and very specific to Central America, I would say, this type of 6-8, this type of meter. And it's all over this music. It's wonderful.

 

ELG: Yeah, and something that I note is, yeah, you got this 123456, 123456, you know, so hence the six in the term six-eight. But in this particular song, it like, it goes for a while and then there's a little pause! And then it goes again, and then there's a little pause! And I'm just thinking, "por todos los que quieren bailar,” [for] all who wish to dance. It's like, how courteous that is, because that would be a pretty fast rhythm to keep going with your feet while dancing, that 123456, 123456. That would be difficult to do. So it's giving you a little breathing spaces along the way.

But obviously the dancers would need to know the song well enough to coordinate with it. So we're not talking about we're not talking about a simple situation here.

 

DC: Or maybe they would do what I would do, which is basically just stumble, stumble around the dance floor, around the tarima. {both laugh] Until I give out.

 

ELG: [OK, let's listen to a second, very different selection, also P'urhépecha music. So this is this is a son, that is, it's slow, but it is also a pirekua, that is, it is sung. So here we go.

 

 

_________

MUSIC CLIP #2, “Tarheperama _________

ELG: Well, I would almost have said that that was a vals, except there's something about it that is not vals-like. It's so interesting, it's got a kind of a lilt to the rhythms that is all its own.

 

DC: [Yeah, I would agree, I think it's a, it's more of this very particular way of approaching six-eight, right? This 123, 1... which is typical of waltzes. But then you have this, I guess we can call polyrhythm going on, where it goes, ta-ti ta-ti, ta-ti ta-ti. So it's moving from three to four at the same time, right?

 

ELG: Yeah.

 

DC: You don't hear that in waltzes, but you do hear that in indigenous musics of the new world, in Central America. You hear a lot of this -- so there's this constant switching back and forth. It's  fascinating. And it's it's very, very Central American, as I hear it.

 

ELG: So interesting. And it's so engaging! I mean, the music is not rhythmically simple. Not at all. And and then, of course, you have a sweetness and a richness that comes when you have two voices that are just singing in this very fluid vocal harmony all the way through a song.

 

DC: Beautiful.

 

ELG: It's, yeah, really beautiful, it's true. And, you know, taking it back to Diana's first song, "Adios California.” That song is serving a different function, I would say. Clearly from the title alone, you know that this is music for migrants. And yet you can also, I think, hear some of the connections. At least that's our hope here... It's all part of a big, big complex, which we can only just touch on here, but just to give a little sense of the richness of that musical world, that is P'urhépecha music.

____________

 

ELG: Well, Diana, so we're getting toward the last part of our interview. And just in the spirit of, you know, looking toward the future and hopes for the future, I learned as we were setting up this interview that you are about to begin your studies at UCLA, correct?

 

 

 

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Yes.

 

ELG: And what area will you be studying in?

 

Diana Morales: So I'm going to be part of the TEP program, the Teacher Education Program, and so I'll be in the Ethnic Studies pathway. So in two years I will be in the LAUSD district teaching Ethnic Studies. And so that's something that I I'm really pursuing with all of my heart.

 

You know, like I mentioned throughout this this whole talk, learning the true history, and learning "las historias no contadas," is the reason why I'm going into this program. And a lot of that history is also history that I'm bringing in from my family, from oral tradition that isn't written down, that isn't in the books, and that can also definitely be told through art.

 

ELG: And must be told.

 

Diana Morales: Yes.

 

ELG: Yeah... What what age of kids do you plan to teach?

 

Diana Morales: Hopefully high school,

 

ELG: Yeah, they are hard cases! [both laugh] That's a tough line of work! But I agree with you, that's -- at that age is when I think history and the ways that we tell history -- or histories, I should say, because it's always plural, you know -- that's where it really, really becomes important.

 

Diana Morales: Yeah.

 

ELG: Well, congratulations to you for that. That is... That is so exciting. I'm excited for those kids, you know, two years down the road, that to be getting a teacher like you, who is going to be just blowing open this whole idea that History is a single thing with a capital H. You know, we gotta, we really gotta explode that, because it does damage on so many levels. And I, as a historian, I just believe that that this kind of change, changing the narrative like you're saying, you know, that that's fundamental, it's fundamental. So, good for you.

 

Diana Morales: Thank you.

 

ELG: And welcome to UCLA!

 

Diana Morales: [laughs] Thank you.

 

ELG: This has been a lovely interview, and I've really enjoyed getting to know you.

 

Diana Morales: Well, first of all, thank you, likewise. I really enjoyed this conversation. Thank you for the invitation to be here. I really hope that the folks that this reaches out to, maybe some of them are P'urhépecha youth, that they reach out and want to have more conversations about what this experience is like, being a part of the P'urhépecha diaspora. And yeah, I'm here.

 

 

ELG: That's very cool. This is a podcast principally, but we do broadcast on Radio Santa Ana. So that, you know, is a little bit more accessible for some people. So hopefully through one of these media, yeah, we'll be reaching out to young people like yourself who are telling new stories.

 

Diana Morales: Thank you.

 

ELG: All right, thank you, Diana.

Would you like to know more?

On our website at siyofuera.org, you can find complete transcripts in both languages of every interview, our Blog about the issues of history, culture, and politics that come up around every song, links for listeners who might want to pursue a theme further, and some very cool imagery. You’ll find playlists of all the songs from all the interviews to date, and our special Staff-curated playlist as well.

We invite your comments or questions! Contact us at our website or participate in the Si Yo Fuera conversation on social media. We’re out there on FaceBook and Instagram. And then there’s just plain old word of mouth. If you like our show, do please tell your friends to give it a listen. And do please subscribe, on any of the major podcast platforms. We’ll bring a new interview for you, every two weeks on Friday mornings.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, and Wesley McClintock are our sound engineers; Zoë Broussard and Laura Díaz hold down the marketing; David Castañeda is Music Researcher; Jen Orenstein translates interviews to and from Spanish; Deyaneira García and Alex Dolven make production possible. We are a not-for-profit venture, currently and gratefully funded by the John Paul Simon Guggenheim Foundation, UCLA’s Faculty Grants Program, and the Herb Alpert School of Music

For now, and until the next interview—keep listening to one another!

I’m Elisabeth Le Guin, and this is, “Si yo fuera una canción -- If I were a song…”


Español

Saludos y bienvenidxs al episodio más reciente de “Si yo fuera una canción.” Somos un podcast y programa de radio, en donde la gente de Santa Ana, California nos cuenta en sus propias palabras, de las músicas que más le importan.

ELG: Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, la anfitriona del programa, y Directora del proyecto.

Este proyecto se basa en mi convicción que nosotrxs, la gente del mundo moderno, necesitamos aprender a mejor escucharnos; y que la música, con todo lo que nos conlleva, es el lugar perfecto para empezar.

DAVID: Mi nombre es David Castañeda, investigador de música aquí en el podcast SYFUC. Estoy muy feliz de ser parte de este proyecto, utilizando mi entrenamiento académico y mi experiencia profesional como músico, para traerles las historias, la música y las experiencias vividas de quienes viven aquí en Santa Ana.

ELG: Bienvenida, Diana. Me alegra mucho tenerte aquí para entrevistarte, y también por la oportunidad de conocerte un poco. Entonces, para comenzar, favor de presentarte de la forma que te gustaría que te conozcan  la audiencia. Tu nombre, tu edad si no te incomoda, y cualquier cosa sobre lo que haces, en qué momento de tu vida te encuentras, lo que sea que piensas que le ayudaría a  la audiencia a conocerte mejor.

Diana Morales: Sí, gracias por invitarme. Mi nombre es Diana Morales. Nací en Santa Cruz Tanaco, Michoacán, y vivo en Santa Ana.

Entonces me identifico con Santa Ana, como santanera, y también con raíces michoacanas. Entonces en la actualidad lo que hago, la mayoría del tiempo, pues soy una ilustradora digital que hace arte P’urhépecha.

Y eso para mí se trata de contar historias sobre quien soy, o de dónde viene mi familia, para poder compartir nuestra cultura.

ELG: Mmm. ¿Qué edad tenías cuando llegaste a Santa Ana?

Diana Morales: Pues estaba a punto de cumplir cinco años. No me acuerdo mucho de México.

ELG: Entonces no has tenido la oportunidad de volver.

Diana Morales: No, no puedo, porque tengo DACA.

ELG: Ah sí. Sí, qué pena eso. Y, claro, mencionaste el arte P’urhépecha y… cuéntanos un poco sobre eso. Esas son tus raíces, ¿verdad?

Diana Morales: Sí, P'urhépecha es una cultura indígena de Michoacán. Y son cuatro regiones que forman el territorio P'urhépecha. Entonces están algo divididas, y se conocen como la región de la meseta, la región del lago, la región de los once pueblos, y la región de la ciénaga de Zacapu.

ELG: Mmm.

Diana Morales: Esas son las regiones que se consideran los territorios provinciales. Y de ahí ha habido mucha migración dentro de México y a los Estados Unidos.

ELG: Sí, claro, como las capas multiples de la migración, ¿no?

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

ELG: ¿Es-- ? Perdona mi ignorancia, ¿Es Michoacán como el punto central para la gente P'urhépecha? ¿Por ahí está como la concentración principal de ese grupo, dentro de México?

Diana Morales: Sí, entonces eso se considera nuestro territorio nativo y tradicional.

ELG: Guau. Yo espero por ti, que tengas la oportunidad de volver lo antes posible.

Diana Morales: Sí, yo también.

ELG: Qué bien que estés manteniendo esa conexión, aunque estás obligada quedarse aquí -- lejos de aquella tierra.

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

ELG: He visto algo de tu arte, tienes un sitio web encantador, y una presencia en Instagram, y haremos carga de dar los enlaces a esas cosas cuando se lanza el episodio. Está muy padre lo que estás haciendo. Dijiste que es arte digital, ¿verdad? No me di cuenta, porque no se ve tan “digital” en el sentido de que se ve muy natural y, ¿cómo lo diría? -- Como sólido. Y esas hermosas imágenes de mujeres con hermosos colores al fondo, y… ¿Cómo ves tu arte? ¿Que papel crees que juega tu arte en este entorno urbano en que vivimos?

Diana Morales: Sí, muchas gracias por el halago. Sí, definitivamente, una de las figuras principales que trato de incluir siempre en mi arte es la mujer. Especialmente porque hay mujeres P'urhépechas a las cuales admiro mucho, que me inspiran. Y para mí han sido  las personas que necesitaba, sabes,  portadoras de la cultura P'urhépecha aquí en los EE. UU., siendo tan lejos de nuestros territorios. Y entonces, sabes, creciendo en Santa Ana, es un espacio muy urbano. Existen unos jardines comunitarios aquí que para mí han sido lugares donde pudiera reconectarme con lo que significaba para mi familia en los territorios, sembrar milpas, o cempaxúchitl, todo tipo de quelites.  

Así que siento que mi arte es una forma de visualizar, todo eso, las formas tradicionales de sembrar semillas. Y algunas de esas semillas sí llegan con nosotrxs, son semillas que hemos traído con nosotrxs, a través de la migración. Así es que me gusta pensar que nuestras prácticas tradicionales no están acabando. No necesariamente están en peligro de la extinción. Hay mucho que podemos hacer para preservarlas.

ELG: Sí, cierto. Y hay tantas cosas interesantes que estás diciendo ahí. Estás referiendo a lo que suele llamarse La Granjita, aquí en Santa Ana.

Diana Morales: Sí.

________

INSERCIÓN #1.

DC: Si quieres saber un poco más sobre la Granjita, escucha el episodio 10. En ese episodio, Elisabeth habla con Abel Ruiz, quien dirige la Granjita de Santa Ana, y nos explica la importancia humana de los jardines y las tensiones entre el idealismo y la seguridad.

________

ELG. Sabes, tan sola la idea de las semillas, de la forma en que… – digo, cada semilla lleva una planta dentro de si misma, que bajo las condiciones  propicias, crecerá y florecerá y se convertirá en una nueva vida. Y digo, qué metáfora maravillosa para la migración. Porque las semillas son súper portátiles en su mayoría, y pueden viajar a todo tipo de lugar, y con las condiciones buenas, crecerán y echarán raíces y crearán un nuevo ecosistema. Y eso es muy parecido a lo que pasa cuando la gente migra, llevando su cultura consigo.

Diana Morales: Mmm, sí.

ELG: Qué buena onda, que eso se destaca en tu arte y en lo que haces. Lo admiro mucho.

Diana Morales: Gracias. Muchas gracias.

ELG: Bueno. Vamos a pasar a la primera de las dos canciones que compartiste conmigo. Esta representa o expresa de alguna forma de dónde vienes, que es una frase que a propósito sale un poco abierta y vaga, como “¿de dónde eres?” Eso podría tratar de la geografía, pero también de la cultura, o el estado de ánimo. Y entonces, si pudieras contarnos un poco sobre esta canción, cómo se llama, y luego la escuchamos.

Diana Morales: Bueno, la primera canción que para mí, me recuerda tanto de donde vengo se llama “Adiós California” [se ríe]

La escogí porque crecí con ella, la escuchaba todo el tiempo, o sea, literalmente todos los domingos.

ELG: Mm hmm.

Diana Morales: Y lo que esta canción dice básicamente es, bueno, habla desde la perspectiva de alguien que es P'urhépecha y que ha migrado a California, y luego por alguna razón inesperada, tiene que dejar California y volver a su pueblo.

ELG: Mm hmm.

Diana Morales: Y entonces siempre la escuchaba como niña. Y me recuerda de la experiencia de mis padres, ¿no?

Porque siempre me han dicho que tienen planes de volver a sus pueblos algún día, después de que todxs hayamos graduado de la universidad, después de que tengamos trabajo y hayamos hecho los estudios…

ELG: Mm hmm.

Diana Morales:  Es la gran esperanza, de volver un día al pueblo. Y entonces esta canción ha sido presente toda mi vida, y creo que es una canción que reconocerán muchísima gente P'urhépecha aquí en la diáspora. Sí. Y encima, es una canción hermosa.

ELG: Órale. Bueno, vamos a escucharla.

CLIP DE MÚSICA # 1

La Banda de Zirahuén, “Adiós California”

ELG: Entonces – ellxs no suenan tan infelices, ante la posibilidad de dejar California.

Diana Morales: ¡Pues, no! En realidad, es una canción muy alegre, y la oía mucho durante las fiestas que armaríamos aquí en Santa Ana. Y entonces era una canción que, pues si todo mundo la conocía, tienes que ir a bailarla.

ELG: Anjá, anjá. Y entonces, antes de que la pusimos, mencionaste que esta canción es un poco como un himno para la comunidad P'urhépecha aquí. Y sé que existe una tal comunidad en la zona de L.A., entonces quizás nos podrías contar un poco más … ¿Es Santa Ana un  centro importante para la diáspora P'urhépecha aquí? ¿O será en otra parte de L.A.?

Diana Morales: Bueno, de lo que yo sepa, entre Santa Ana y L.A. se han documentado como 700 familias que forman parte de la diáspora.

ELG: Guau.

Diana Morales: Y luego específicamente en Santa Ana y Costa Mesa, puedes encontrar a personas que vienen di mi pueblo, de Santa Cruz Tanaco.

ELG: Mm hmm.

Diana Morales: Y entonces se sabe allá en el pueblo, que Santa Ana es una de las ciudades a la cual migramos. Y luego entre los demás lugares que conozco, hay, por ejemplo, Salinas, que es un campo de fresas. Y esa es una de las principales razones para que la gente migra a la costa central de California: trabajos agrícolas.

ELG: Sí, y Dios mío, me dicen que  pizcar fresas es una de las formas de labor de campo más intensas porque crecen muy cerca del suelo, ¿cierto?

Diana Morales: Mm hmm, sí.

ELG: Entonces te agachas todo el día. Entonces, sí, podría imaginar que,  al dejar un trabajo así –

Diana Morales: --¡que uno se encontraría bien alegre! [se ríe]

ELG: Sí, exactamente.

Diana Morales: Sí. Otra parte de la canción es el hecho de que el cantante dice que recibió una carta, y es por eso por lo que tiene que volver a su pueblo. Y entonces eso se puede interpretar como alguien aquí en los EE. UU. que recibe una carta de un miembro de su familia que dice, por ejemplo, que alguien está enfermx, o que un pariente se está muriendo.

Y eso es algo en que pienso mucho, y que he platicado con mi propia familia, de la gente que extrañan, amigxs que no han visto en tanto tiempo, o por ejemplo mi abuela –  solo tengo una abuela materna que vive, y una bisabuela del lado de mi papá.

Y entonces pienso en, pues, qué noticias serían tan drásticas, que nos hicieran querer irnos de inmediato.

ELG: Claro, claro, y tendrían que ser noticias drásticas, ¿verdad? Porque si te fueras, no podrías volver.

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Sí.

ELG: Eso significaría en efecto, dejar caer toda tu vida. Y… sí, bajo esas condiciones viven muchas personas que conozco aquí en Santa Ana, y en el Sur de California. Así viven todos los días.

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

ELG: Y es interesante. Yo… yo he disfrutado la libertad de cruzar fronteras toda la vida, hasta este último año y medio, cuando una pandemia global lo hizo muy difícil, y en muchos casos imposible. Y es raro pensar en que, aunque muchxs de mis amigxs estén indocumentadxs, y eso es un asunto que tomo muy al pecho, y sobre lo cual tengo fuertes sentimientos y opiniones, -- no creo que entendía en mi corazón realmente cómo sería, cómo se sentiría, hasta el momento en que me di cuenta de que no podía ir a visitar a mi hija que vive en Canadá. Que eso realmente no era una opción, ni siquiera si estuviera pasando por un momento muy malo, o muriéndose o lo que sea--no iba a poder visitarla. Y eso—cuando me di cuenta de eso, era uno de los momentos más fuertes de la pandemia para mí, realizar “¡Ajá! Ahora sí entiendo un poco más lo que viven muchxs de mis amigxs y conocidxs, todos los días.” Diría que ha sido una lección para mí, en ese sentido.

Diana Morales: Sí, definitivamente hay muchos cambios que tienen que pasar, y  cambios esperando su momento, por muchísimo tiempo.

ELG: Sí… sí cierto. Bueno y, luego, ¡esta canción! Es extremadamente animada y alegre. Y eso es algo que admiro mucho, el hecho de que estos músicos—y, bueno, una cultura entera—saca alegría y buen ánimo de una situación que en muchos sentidos no es nada buena. Y, sabes—Es lo de, “¡Vamos a estar contentxs porque esto es lo que tenemos!”

Diana Morales: Sí, [se ríe] Sí, me encanta eso. Es como… una forma de abrazar la tristeza, pero al mismo tiempo la alegría que acompañaría la realización

que quizás, puedes volver a tu pueblo.

ELG: Sí.

Diana Morales: Eso es la complejidad. Nada es completamente malo, y nada es completamente bueno.

ELG: Sí, tienes toda la razón.  Quiero decir que  esa canción, en la superficie, suena como música muy sencilla, letras muy sencillas, pero tienes toda la razón. ¡No es nada sencilla!  Se trata de algo muy, muy complejo.

Diana Morales: Sí.

ELG: Sí, qué bueno. Entonces, sí, estamos de acuerdo de que hay muchas cosas importantes que tienen que cambiar, y con eso podemos empezar a dirigir nuestros pensamientos un poco hacia el futuro, donde puede que pasen esos cambios, y quizás la cuestión de cómo esos cambios van a pasar. Y la segunda canción que pedí que escogieras, habla de esas cuestiones. Yo les pido a mis entrevistadxs, que escojan una segunda canción que representa o expresa sus esperanzas para el futuro. Entonces, ¿te gustaría contarnos un poco sobre la que escogiste en esa categoría?

Diana Morales: Sí… para la segunda canción, sobre la esperanza y lo que deseo para el futuro, escogí la canción “Creo en ti” por Ana Tijoux. Ella es una artista chilena que creo que muchas personas en el movimiento—muchos movimientos, aquí en los EE. UU.-- conocen. Y diría que esta también es una canción que nos da ánimos, en las marchas, ánimos… Puede que sentimos que no estamos haciendo lo suficiente. Pero definitivamente hay cambios que sí están realizándose, cuando continuamos haciendo este trabajo. Y entonces, para mí, siento que con sus palabras Ana Tijoux es alguien que realmente llega a lo más hondo. Toca las cuerdas de mi corazón. Hay canciones suyas que, cuando me estaba enterando de ella, al escucharlas por primera vez, me rompería en lágrimas, porque todo lo que ella decía, me lo siento, me lo siento profundamente. Y también pienso que, como artista, abraza mucho la imaginación, y la afirmación—o sea, las primeras letras de esta canción son simplemente, “Creo en lo imposible”. Y me siento como para mí, pues, ¡esa soy yo! [se ríe] Y dentro de mi arte, eso es definitivamente algo que estoy tratando de hacer, sabes, hacer esas ilustraciones que se tratan de la alegria, ilustraciones que honran a las mujeres de mi familia, gente P'urhépecha que están continuando con el trabajo, resistiendo en cualquier forma que puedan. Sabes, a veces no trata de marchar, manifestar y arriesgarse la vida. A veces es simplemente preservar la lengua, y hacer cositas como preparar comidas tradicionales, y mantener las relaciones de la comunidad. Aún desde aquí. Y entonces siento que esta canción de Ana se trata mucho de creer en lo que quizás veamos imposible. ¡Y -- que no lo es! También me encanta otra frase que dice "Creo en lo imposible/que de nuestras espaldas/brotaran las alas" –

¡Eso, sí creo! [se ríe] Yo verdaderamente creo que existe magia dentro de nosotrxs mismxs y dentro de los espacios de comunidad, magia que nos sana y que nos hace recoger las fuerzas y las ganas de seguir adelante.

ELG: ¡Ándale! Ay, pues, que introducción más bella. Vamos a escuchar la canción.

_________________________________

CLIP DE MÚSICA #2:

Ana Tijoux, “Creo en ti”

+ INSERCIÓN #2

DC: Esta no es la primera vez que escucha sobre Ana Tijoux aquí en "Si yo fuera una canción." Marlha Sánchez también habló sobre la importancia de esta artista y el significado que tiene esta música para ella y muchas comunidades aquí en Santa Ana. Todo esto y más se puede escuchar en el episodio 12.

__________________

ELG: Entonces, sí, esa canción está llena de esperanza, pero es que, ahhh… no sé. Hay diferentes tipos de esperanza, ¿no? Y a veces la esperanza puede ser algo ciega. O sea, sabes --esperas algo sin pensarlo mucho, porque si lo piensas mucho no es, no se siente tan optimista.

Diana Morales: ¡Sí!

ELG: Pero esta no es aquel tipo de canción. Digo, es muy claro que Ana Tijoux piensa mucho en las cosas.

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

ELG: Y, bueno, mencionaste que sus palabras te van directo al corazón. Yo te entiendo. Ella las escoge bien. Y… sí, cuéntame un poco do cómo funciona la transformación del refrán de la canción, que dice “creo en ti”-- ¿cómo es que,  al creer en el prójimo, llegas a creer en ti misma?

Diana Morales: Hmm. Uff... Bueno, pues, volviendo a la razón por la cual escogí esta canción, es una canción que entró en mi vida al mismo tiempo que me estaba sumergiendo en el mundo activista y aprendiendo las historias del imperialismo, colonialismo, cosas que nunca, nunca sabía. ¡En la prepa no te enseñan eso!

ELG: Muy cierto eso. [ambas se ríen]

Diana Morales: Entonces para mí, no fue hasta después de la universidad que empezaba a cuestionar esas cosas, y que empecé a… a casi sumergirme en esa política de identidad de ser Indígena, ser migrante. A decir “indocumentadx, sin miedo.” Y esos movimientos casi de soltar—o casi soltar -- el miedo. Esa canción estaba presente durante toda esa época de transición de los años  universitarios. Y entonces al pensar en la canción, también pienso en los movimientos en los EE. UU. y en Latinoamérica que luchan contra el imperialismo, que todavía está muy presente y está tratando de destruir comunidades. Y entonces para mí, esta canción era algo a lo cual realmente podía aferrarme. Y, sí…

ELG: Bueno, sí. Hay algo interesante pasando aquí. A ver si lo podemos mirar más de cerca. Entonces…tenemos la política de identidad, donde la gente sale al mundo intentando hacer cambios para beneficiar un grupo a lo cual pertenece. Y eso puede tomar varias formas, ¿verdad? Y una de ellas tiene que ver con la identidad étnica.

Y existe un punto de vista, entre otros, que las políticas de identidad tienen la potencial de dividirnos aún más. Y somos un país ya bastante dividido. Pero esta --la cosa de que tú hablas, es todo lo contrario. Digo, “Creo en ti”, y entonces, por eso, creo en mí. Es como —es un tipo de activismo que se basa en, pues, la empatía, supongo. ¿Sería la palabra correcta?

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Mm hmm.

ELG: Y, ¿lo ves como una forma de activismo particularmente Indígena?

O ¿como funciona eso para tí?

Diana Morales: Sí, digo, para mí, no lo empecé de ver de esa forma hasta que empezara en el papel de organizadora, a juntarme a las marchas y sentirme segura dentro de una comunidad, y de sentir que estuvimos ahí colectivamente por un motivo, y de aferrarme a eso con dignidad.

Y entonces, pues, creciendo en Santa Ana, es muy probable que vayas a toparte con muchos colectivos activistas. Y entonces ahí también empezaba a aprender la historia, y empezaba a hacerme preguntas como “¿De dónde vengo?” y, “¿Cuáles son las historias mias que aún retengo, que debería conservar? O sea, “las historias no contadas”, ¿cierto? Como dice Ana Tijoux. Y entonces me hago esas preguntas con frecuencia. Y luego, esa frase, “Creo en ti”, la siento como Ana Tijoux me lo estuviera recitando—y también como yo, repitiéndolo a todas las personas con las que he cruzado y construido comunidad—“Yo creo en tí. Me siento segura contigo. Siento que puedo contar contigo.”  Así que parte de mi experiencia con la organización comunitaria en Santa Ana ha sido muy—pues, algo de que he hablado en el pasado, es esta cultura de echarnos la mano. Y sin duda, creo que eso tiene raíces en prácticas Indígenas, comunidades de las cuales vienen muchxs migrantes a Santa Ana. Y una parte es P'urhépecha, otra parte no. Y entonces, ahora en este momento de mi vida, siento como este “Creo en ti” también ha vuelto como una forma de creer en nosotrxs mismxs para mi familia, que aún podemos lograr mucho más. Aunque no sea en las marchas, por ejemplo, que es algo peligroso para mis padres.

ELG: Sí.

Diana Morales: Entonces, pienso en diferentes formas en que podemos resistir sin tener que ponernos en peligro. Y como decía, pueden tomar la forma de cosas como, conservar nuestra lengua. Yo veo eso como un gran modo de resistencia. Veo el trabajo que yo hago, de hacer arte y conservar alegría, conservar el orgullo, reconocer quienes somos, haciendo visible nuestra existencia—esa es otra forma de resistir.

En fin, siento que después de un largo camino de estar en el movimiento, como organizadora, y ¡sintiendo miedo! Miedo en las marchas con la presencia de policía y todo aquello, siento que era muy difícil. Y es más difícil aún, si no te sientes que tienes a tu comunidad ahí apoyándote. Entonces, --sí.

ELG: Sí, me imagino que sería casi imposible sin esa, sabes. Sin alguien que te respalde.

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Sí.

ELG: Dijiste tantas cosas maravillosas. Y estoy ahorita viendo las letras de la canción. Y ella dice "Yo vine a compartir/con quien haya entendido/que la pelea empieza por el nido."

________

La versión español no tiene

inserción #3

__________

Diana Morales: Mm hmm.

ELG: Que suena un poco como lo que acabas de decir, que, sabes, que el activismo puede tomar varias formas. Y salir a las calles a marchar es una, pero es solamente una. Y quedarse en casa a cocinar comida increíble puede ser otra, ¿no?

Diana Morales: [se ríe ligeramente] Sí.

ELG: Y luego tenemos lo de la lengua, que me parece súper interesante, que… por ejemplo, tus padres. ¿Ellos hablan P'urhépecha, en casa?

Diana Morales: Sí, es la lengua nativa de ambxs. Aprendieron el español más  tarde en sus vidas.

ELG: Ah.

Diana Morales: Y yo crecí hablando el español, escuchando P'urhé en casa, pero sin practicar mucho el responder. Entonces soy como mitad mitad. [se ríe]

Y luego, el inglés.

ELG: Sí, como dicen, hablante por herencia.

Diana Morales: Mm-hm. Sí.

ELG: Sí, ¡y luego el inglés! Y estamos haciendo esta entrevista en inglés.

Diana Morales: [se ríe ligeramente] Sí.

ELG: Es, sabes, es toda una mezcla, loca y bella, y luego el propósito de este podcast es de que sea bilingüe. Y sí traducimos cada entrevista, que es literalmente el doble de trabajo. Y ¡eso trata tan solo de dos lenguas! -- Y luego, están todos los demás idiomas en México. ¿Cuántos tienen allá? Hay como 87 grupos distintos de idiomas Indígenas, tan solo en México, que se hablan a base cotidiana.  

Es una variedad increíblemente rica. Y sí, ¡las historias salen diferentes cuando las cuentas en otra lengua! [ambas se ríen]

Diana Morales: Sí, sí.

ELG: Y salen diferentes según el medio, también. Entonces -- tu forma de contar historias tiende más hacia lo visual.

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Sí, parte de la razón que trabajo tanto con imágenes es porque, eh… porque no sé escribir nuestra lengua. Y eso, principalmente porque nuestra lengua no es una lengua escrita, sino una lengua oral.

ELG: Ah, sí.

Diana Morales: Y siento que las imágenes que estoy creando son referentes a muchas de las formas en que comunicamos, por ejemplo, grabados, pictografías, hay muchos deseños hermosos que llevamos en la ropa, que formamos en barro, artesanías de barro que todavía tenemos, o grabados de madera. Hay tantísimas formas en que compartiríamos nuestras creencias con la lengua.

_________

INSERCIÓN #4

ELG: Pues, me acordé mal. La cifra del número de lenguas indígenas que actualmente se habla en México no es 87, es 68. ¡Sólo 68! Todavía es una panorama lingüística asombrosa. El lenguaje P'urhépecha es número 15 en la lista de lenguas autóctonas habladas actualmente en México. Tiene casi 150 mil hablantes, y un dato interesante es que el número de hablantes de P'urhépecha está creciendo año por año. Y esto creo que se debe a la migración.

Radio Santa Ana, que emite nuestro programa cada dos semanas, tiene un programa, creo que semanal, en P'urhépecha. Se llama "La hora purépecha con Aguanita Zamora." Y si les interesa se puede buscar en RadioSantaAna.org.

_________

ELG: Sí, qué bueno. Quizás me podrías ayudar a encontrar unas imágenes que podemos conectar a esta entrevista en nuestro sitio web. Me encantaría poder usarlo como una plataforma para compartir tu arte.

Diana Morales: Sí, puedo compartir unas imágenes contigo.

ELG: Eso sería genial. Entonces, tengo una pregunta más sobre -- bueno, sobre ambas canciones. Sé que existe música P'urhépecha. ¿Aparecen algunos sonidos de esta música, tal como la conoces o recuerdas, en una u otra de las canciones que escogiste? ¿Hay algo en los sonidos de las canciones que te lleva sónicamente a ese mundo?

Diana Morales: Sí, bueno, digo, la primera fue escrita por la Banda Zirahuén, que también es el nombre de un pueblo en Michoacán. Entonces ese sonido de los bailes, lo siento siempre como una llamada, como algo que siempre reconozco, como estar en casa. Y es  también una parte de por qué   escogí esa canción, porque escuchándola todos los fines de semana cuando era niña, eso me acuerda mucho de mi casa. Y es algo que nunca escuché fuera de mi casa, o sea, ni en la escuela,  ni con mis amigxs or en otros espacios públicos. Entonces el sonido de la canción siempre ha sido el sonido de estar en casa.

ELG: Qué padre. Entonces el mero ritmo, ese ritmo particular que tiene la canción. ¿Tendrá un nombre específico, como tipo de baile?

Diana Morales: La verdad, no sé. Pero sé que estas canciones son pirekuas. Y los cantantes son pirerís. Y hay gente que han hecho más investigación sobre los sonidos de ciertos instrumentos tradicionales que usábamos en el pasado, como flautas y diferentes tipos de tambores.

ELG: Sí, sí.

__________

INSERCIÓN #5

NOTA: no es una traducción, sino trata de temas parecidos. Los diálogos de encartes se hablan de manera improvisada

ELG: Según entiendo a resulta de mis investigaciones, es que en la música P'urhépecha, en efecto, hay dos ritmos principales: el rápido y el lento. Las músicas lentas en esta tradición se llaman sones, y las rápidas se llaman abajeños.

DC: OK.

ELG: Pero -- cualquier ritmo que haya, si se canta, se llama pirekua -- según entiendo yo. No somos expertos para nada. Ni tú ni yo. Pero sí tenemos, como entrenamientos que pueden servir para para señalar algunos rasgos de cada música. Así que, vamos a empezar con un abajeño, es decir, una música rápida, no cantada, así que no es pirekua. Y los músicos se llaman "La Gran Banda de Ichán Michoacán." Y después nos vamos a hablar un poco.

_____________

CLIP DE MÚSICA #1, Grand Banda Ichán de Michoacán, “Abajeño para rodos los que quieren bailar”

_____________

ELG: Pues cuéntame un poco de lo que escuchas en esa música.

DC: Es un sentido, no? Es un sentido rítmico que para mí, como investigador, estudiante de la música latina, es un producto de lo que llamamos América Central, no? De México y todo eso. Porque el ritmo se puede llamar 6 por 8: Ta-ti-ta, ta-ti-ta, ta-ti-ta,  123, 123, 123. Pero también tiene lo que llamamos el "common time.” Que puede ser 1234, 1234, -- pero ¡a la vez!

ELG: Mmm.

DC: Pero en esta música es algo muy hermoso y muy de esta tierra. De esa confluencia de [lo] indígena y africano y español de esa época.

ELG: En efecto, un rasgo centroamericano musical.

DC: Centroamericano, si.

ELG: Anjá, qué interesante. Otra cosa que yo he notado escuchando, es... Bueno, el título de esta pieza es "Abajeño para todos los que quieren bailar." Describe muy bien el carácter animado de la música. Pero esta música, esta pieza, por lo menos, es que es muy cortés, porque -- hay una frase musical, rápido, rápido, rápido, rápido. Y luego hay una pausa. Y luego otra frase y una pausa. Y otra frase y una pausa. Me parece ideal para lxs bailadorxs como yo, que no estamos tan de forma, y necesitamos respirar entre frases! [se ríen]

Y ahora pasamos a otra pieza P'urhépecha que es un son. Es decir, es música lenta. Pero es también pirekua porque está cantada. Bueno, escuchamos

_______________

CLIP DE MÚSICA #2, “Tarheperama”

_______________

ELG. Yo casi diría que era un vals, pero no. Pero no, porque hay algo que nunca se escucharía en ningún vals, ¿correcto?

DC: [Correcto, correcto, muy parecido a un vals, pero también tenemos otra vez este sentido rítmico que tiene el 6 por 8 y el tiempo común a la vez, en esta canción puedes oír los dos, a la vez, en la misma canción. Es muy de América Central.

ELG: Y a pesar de esta complejidad rítmica que describes, se teje perfectamente en una música muy, muy agradable. Otro aspecto de la música es la armonía vocal. Dos voces en armonía perfecta, por toda la canción cantan así. Es muy dulce, muy dulce y como... Un trago de miel, no?

DC: Sí, exacto, exacto.

ELG: Un trago de miel sonoro... Y bueno, no más volviendo un ratito a la canción que eligió Diana, "Adiós California.” También es música P'urhépecha, tal como dice, pero es música para migrantes P'urhépechas. Y bueno, hay muchas, muchas músicas. Es una comunidad medio grande allá en Michoacán. Y nomás hemos podido rozar la mera franja de este, el mundo musical P'urhépecha.

_____________

ELG: Bueno, Diana, estamos llegando a la última parte de la entrevista.

Y en el espíritu de mirar hacia adelante, y las esperanzas para el futuro: cuando estuvimos organizándonos para esta entrevista, me enteré de que estás a punto de comenzar tus estudios en la UCLA (la Universidad de California en Los Ángeles), ¿correcto?

Diana Morales: Mm hmm. Sí.

ELG: Y ¿en qué vas a especializar?

Diana Morales: Bueno, formaré parte del programa TEP, que es el programa de educación para maestros, y mi enfoque va a ser, los estudios étnicos. Entonces en dos años estaré en el distrito de LAUSD enseñando los estudios étnicos. Y es algo que estoy persiguiendo con todo mi corazón.  

Sabes, como he mencionado varias veces aquí, lo de aprender la verdadera historia, aprender “las historias no contadas,” es la razón por la cual estoy entrando en este programa. Y una gran parte de esa historia es también historia que traigo de mi familia, de la tradición oral que no se ha escrito, que no parece en los libros, y que definitivamente puede  contarse a través del arte.

ELG: Y que tiene que contarse.

Diana Morales: Eso, sí.

ELG: Sí… ¿Qué edad de niñxs piensas enseñar?

Diana Morales: Lxs de la prepa, espero.

ELG: Uff, ¡ellxs son casos duros! [ambas se ríen] ¡Eso sí es trabajo fuerte! Pero estoy de acuerdo contigo, eso es la edad en cuando la historia -- o mejor dicho, las historias, porque es siempre plural, sabes—esa edad es cuando eso se vuelve muy importante.

Diana Morales: Sí.

ELG: Bueno, te felicito por eso. Es muy emocionante. Me emociono por tus futurxs alumnxs, que en dos años van a tener una maestra como tú, que vas a volar por los aires esa idea que la Historia es una cosa singular, con la ‘h’ en mayúscula. Sabes, tenemos que deshacernos de eso, porque hace daño en tantos niveles. Yo, como historiadora, creo que este tipo de cambio, el hecho de cambiar el discurso, tal como dices, es, bueno, es fundamental. Entonces, te felicito.

Diana Morales: Gracias.

ELG: Y, ¡bienvenida a UCLA!

Diana Morales: [se ríe] Gracias.

ELG: Esta ha sido une linda entrevista, ha sido un placer llegar a conocerte.

Diana Morales: Bueno, antes que nada, gracias, igualmente. Disfruté mucho esta conversación. Gracias por invitarme. Espero que entre la gente que nos escuche, que quizás entre ellxs estén unxs jóvenes P'urhépecha, y que ellxs se  pongan en comunicación, y que tengan las ganas de armar más conversaciones sobre cómo es la experiencia de ser parte de la diáspora P'urhépecha. Y sí, aquí estoy.

ELG: Qué padre. Este es principalmente un podcast, pero también tenemos emisiones en Radio Santa Ana, creo que eso es un poco más accesible para algunxs. Entonces ojalá que, a través de uno de esos medios, alcancemos a jóvenes como tú, que están contando nuevas historias.

Diana Morales: Gracias.

ELG: Bueno, gracias a ti, Diana.

¿Quisieran saber más?

En nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, pueden encontrar transcripciones completas en ambas lenguas de cad entrevistaa; nuestro Blog, donde indagamos más en los asuntos históricos, culturales, y políticos que surgen en torno a cada canción; enlaces para oyentes que quisieran investigar un tema más a fondo; y unos imágenes muy chidos. Encontrarán un playlist con todas las canciones de todas las entrevistas hasta la fecha, así como otro playlist elegido por nuestro equipo.

¡Esperamos sus comentarios o preguntas! Contáctennos en nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, o bien pueden participar en la conversación “Si yo fuera” a través de los medios sociales. Estamos en FeisBuk e Instagram. Y, pues, también hay el modo antiguo, de boca en boca. Si les gusta nuestro show, por favor digan a sus amigxs y familiares que lo escuchen. Y por favor, suscríbanse, a través de su plataforma de podcast preferida. Les traeremos una nueva entrevista cada dos semanas, los viernes por la mañana.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, y Wesley McClintock son nuestros soniderxs; Zoë Broussard y Laura Díaz manejan la mercadotecnia; David Castañeda es Investigador de Música; Jen Orenstein traduce las entrevistas entre español e inglés; y Deyaneira García y Alex Dolven facilitan la producción. Somos una entidad sin fines de lucro, actualmente y agradecidamente apoyada por una beca desde la Fundación John Simon Guggenheim, así como fondos desde el Programa de Becas de Facultad de la Universidad de California, Los Angeles, y de la Escuela de Música Herb Alpert en la misma Universidad.

Por ahora, y hasta la próxima entrevista--¡que sigan escuchando unxs a otrxs! Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, y están escuchando, “Si yo fuera una canción.”

English

Diana’s website and Instagram

https://www.arteesmedicina.com/

http://www.instagram.com/arte.es.medicina


Another Interview with Diana

On “Nuestras raíces verdes,” an interesting podcast focused on BIPOC people’s relation to the land //

https://nuestrasraicesverdes.com/podcast/archiving-purhepecha-knowledge-through-art/

______________________________________________________________________________

Indigenous languages in México

“Catálogo de las lenguas indígenas nacionales” (Spanish only)

A Mexican government website // Un sitio Web del gobierno mexicano.

https://www.inali.gob.mx/clin-inali/


The article “Lenguas de México” in Wikipedia is a first-rate introduction to this topic:

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenguas_de_Mexico

English version: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Mexico


______________________________________________________________________________

P’urhépecha music

(everything is in Spanish)


Reynoso Riqué, Cecilia. “Acercamiento a la música purépecha.” Revista redes música: música y musicología desde Baja California. Julio - Diciembre de 2007, Vol. 2, No. 2 / Enero – Junio de 2008, Vol. 3, No. 1. [ www.redesmusica.org/no3 , consultado el 24-26 agosto de 2021]

  • este resumen escueto y cuidadoso cuenta con una discografía muy útil.


Chamorro Escalante, Arturo. Sones de la guerra, rivalidad y emoción en la práctica de la música p’urhépecha. COLMICH, Zamora, 1994.


------------------------------------. “La música Purhépecha a través de su forma y estructura:

Hemiola, cuatrillo, bájeos y armonías.” https://www.colmich.edu.mx/relaciones25/files/revistas/048/J.ArturoChamorroE.pdf

Español

El sitio Web e Instagram de Diana:

https://www.arteesmedicina.com/

http://www.instagram.com/arte.es.medicina


Otra entrevista con Diana

On “Nuestras raíces verdes,” an interesting podcast focused on BIPOC people’s relation to the land //

En “Nuestras raíces verdes,” un podcast interesante (en inglés) sobre las relaciones de la gente de color con la Tierra

https://nuestrasraicesverdes.com/podcast/archiving-purhepecha-knowledge-through-art/

______________________________________________________________________________

Indigenous languages in México

“Catálogo de las lenguas indígenas nacionales” (Spanish only)

Un sitio Web del gobierno mexicano.

https://www.inali.gob.mx/clin-inali/


El artículo “Lenguas de México” en Wikipedia es una introducción excelente a este tópico

https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenguas_de_Mexico

English version: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Mexico


______________________________________________________________________________

P’urhépecha music

(Todo en español )


Reynoso Riqué, Cecilia. “Acercamiento a la música purépecha.” Revista redes música: música y musicología desde Baja California. Julio - Diciembre de 2007, Vol. 2, No. 2 / Enero – Junio de 2008, Vol. 3, No. 1. [ www.redesmusica.org/no3 , consultado el 24-26 agosto de 2021]

  • este resumen escueto y cuidadoso cuenta con una discografía muy útil.


Chamorro Escalante, Arturo. Sones de la guerra, rivalidad y emoción en la práctica de la música p’urhépecha. COLMICH, Zamora, 1994.


------------------------------------. “La música Purhépecha a través de su forma y estructura:

Hemiola, cuatrillo, bájeos y armonías.” https://www.colmich.edu.mx/relaciones25/files/revistas/048/J.ArturoChamorroE.pdf

La Banda de Zirahuen - Adios California

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

Adiós California

Y esto es el orgullo de Michoacán... la banda Zirahuen

Adiós California, adiós california
Ya me voy de aquí

Voy para mi casa a ver a mis amigos
Yo no se si vuelva nuevamente aquí

De que yo regreso, de que yo regreso... No lo se

Solamente dios, solamente dios... Sabe si regresare

Yo tan agusto que estaba
Pero me llego una carta y me tengo que regresar

Con estampilla inmediata
Esta noticia me mata
Adiós California te tengo que abandonar

Adiós California, adiós california
Ya me voy de aquí

Voy para mi casa a ver a mis amigos
Yo no se si vuelva nuevamente aquí

De que yo regreso, de que yo regreso... No lo se

Solamente dios, solamente dios... Sabe si regresare

Yo tan agusto que estaba
Pero me llego una carta y me tengo que regresar

Con estampilla inmediata
Esta noticia me mata
Adiós California te tengo que abandonar


Traducción | Translation

Farewell California

And here they are, the pride of Michoacán… la Banda Zirahuén

Farewell California, farewell California

I’m leaving now

I’m going home to see my friends

I don’t know if I’ll be back again

Will I return, Will I return… 

I don’t know

Only God, only God… knows

 if I’ll return.

I was so comfortable

But a letter came and I have

 to go back

It was stamped urgent

That news kills me

Farewell California, I have to leave you

Farewell California, farewell California

I’m leaving now

I’m going home to see my friends

I don’t know if I’ll be back again

Will I return, Will I return… 

I don’t know

Only God, only God… knows

 if I’ll return.

I was so comfortable

But a letter came and I have

 to go back

It was stamped urgent

That news kills me

Farewell California, I have to leave you


Ana Tijoux - Creo en Ti

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

Creo en Ti


Creo en lo imposible
Que la locura más cuerda
Es buscar como ser libre
Creo en lo imposible
Que de nuestras espaldas
Brotaran las alas
Que nos harán volar invencible
Creo en lo imposible
Que el sin voz Silenciara
El efecto de sus misiles
Creo en lo imposible
Creo que es posible
Hacer de este mundo
Un mundo sensible
Creo en nuestros sueños
Como punta de lanza
El arma perfecta para nivelar la balanza
Creo en las acciones, las acciones cotidianas
Te llenan de vida, te llenan de esperanza

En lo pequeño radica la fuerza
Con tu cariño yo caminaré
Imaginando rutinas bellas
Para dar vuelta el mundo al revés
Empezar por nuestra casa primero
Romper con todos nuestros miedos
Ser consecuente
De cuerpo y de mente
Para alzar el vuelo por senderos nuevos

Porque tu luz cotidiana
Enciende la sonrisa que sale por la mañana


(Creo en ti)

Porque veo tu fuerza inexplicable
Esa justa dignidad inconmensurable
(Creo en ti)

Yo reafirmo que tu rabia proviene del dolor
Y tu lucha florece del amor
(Creo en ti)
Porque en ti, me veo yo
(Creo en ti)

Creo en ti con problemas y dilemas
Con trabas con vallas
Con tropiezos y con penas
Creo en el cotidiano
Que hemos hecho a mano
Tallado con el paso de lo que caminamos

Nadie muestra su careta
Sonrisas y morisquetas
Solo esconden la verdad
Desarticulando la
Micro política de la vida personal
Creo en nuestros sueños
Volando pa'l cielo
Creo en tus acciones más fuertes que balas
Transformando nuestro barrio
Al final de la jornada
Con ideas que el dinero no compra ni paga

Por eso yo no vine a convencer los convencidos
Ni a predicar a los que se sienten vencidos
Yo vine a compartir
Con quien haya entendido
Que la pelea empieza por el nido

Porque tu luz cotidiana
Enciende la sonrisa que sale por la mañana


(Creo en ti)

Porque veo
Tu fuerza inexplicable
Esa justa dignidad inconmensurable
(Creo en ti)

Yo reafirmo que tu rabia proviene del dolor
Y tu lucha florece del amor
(Creo en ti)
Porque en ti me veo yo
(Creo en ti)

Hace tiempo que elegí
(Creo, creo)
Tu mirada junto a mí
(Creo, creo)
Somos rebeldía
(Creo, creo)
La rabia y la alegría
(Creo, creo)
Y en nuestros sueños
(Creo, creo)
Volando pa'l cielo
(Creo, creo)
Desplegando alas
(Creo, creo)
Libertades, esperanzas


Traducción | Translation

Creo en Ti


I believe in the impossible

That the most logical insanity

Is to search for how to be free

I believe in the impossible

That from our backs

Will sprout wings

That will make us fly, invincible

I believe in the impossible

That the one without a voice will silence

The effect of their missiles

I believe in the impossible

I believe it is possible

To make of this world

A sensible world

I believe in our dreams

Like the point of a spear

The perfect weapon to level off the balance

I believe in actions, daily actions

They fill you with life, they fill you with hope

Strength lies in small things

with your tenderness I will walk

Imagining lovely routines

To spin the world in reverse

First we start with our own house

Let go of our fears

Be consistent

In mind and body

To take flight on new paths

Because your daily light

Lights up the smile that comes in the morning

(I believe in you)

Because I see your inexplicable strength

That immeasurable just dignity 

(I believe in you)

I reaffirm that your rage comes from pain

And your fight blooms from love

(I believe in you)

Because in you I see myself

(I believe in you)

I believe in you with problem and dilemmas

With obstacles and hurdles

With blunders and shame

I believe in daily life

That we’ve made by hand

Crafted with the steps we take

No one shows their mask

Smiles and deceptions

Only hiding the truth

Taking apart the

Micropolitics of personal life

I belive in our dreams

Flying in the sky

I believe in your actions, stroner than bullets

Transforming our neighborhood

At the end of the day

With ideas that money can’t buy or pay for

That’s why I didn;t come to convince the

convinced

Or to lecture those who feel defeated

I came to share

With those who’ve understood

That the struggle starts in the womb

Because your daily light

Lights up the smile that comes in the morning

(I believe in you)

Because I see

 your inexplicable strength

That immeasurable just dignity 

(I believe in you)

I reaffirm that your rage comes from pain

And your fight blooms from love

(I believe in you)

Because in you I see myself

(I believe in you)

Some time ago I chose

(I believe, I believe)

Your gaze here with me

(I believe, I believe)

We are rebellion

(I believe, I believe)

Rage and joy

(I believe, I believe)

And in our dreams

(I believe, I believe)

Flying through the sky

(I believe, I believe)

Unfolding our wings

(I believe, I believe)

Freedoms, hopes


Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language
Traducción | Translation