Episodio / Episode #
10
July 30, 2021

Abel Ruíz

English

Español

English

INTRO
Greetings and welcome to THE latest episode of “Si yo fuera una canción”-- “If I Were a Song.” We are a community-based podcast and radio show, in which people of Santa Ana, California, tell us in their own words about the music that means the most to them.


ELG: I am Elisabeth Le Guin, your program host, and Director of this project.
This project is based on my conviction that we people in the modern world need to learn to listen to one another; and that music, and all it brings us, is the perfect place to begin.


DAVID: My name is David Castañeda, music researcher here for the SYFUC podcast. I am so happy to be a part of this project, using my scholarly training and my performance experience to bring you the stories, music, and lived experiences of those living right here in Santa Ana.

INTERVIEW
ELG: Welcome Abel. I’d like to ask you to introduce yourself to our listeners with your full name, and, if you like, your age and a bit about your life, how you came to be in Santa Ana, your profession, things like that. So yeah, whenever you’re ready.

Abel: Yes, thanks a lot Elisabeth. It’s...well thank you so much inviting me to share this space with you and your listeners. This is a very interesting project. My name is Abel Ruiz García, I’m originally from a community in Zacatecas called Tlachichila. Tlachichila, Zacatecas, Mexico. I’m 37 years old...I think...I’ve started losing track! But yes, I’m 37, and I’ve been in Santa Ana....wow, well, since I was 12! Well, so the history of my family here in Santa Ana has been a lot of back and forth. In fact, I was born here, in a house over on Hazard, that’s what the street is called. My mother had me at home, I think because...Well now it’s become popular for lots of reasons, right? To give birth at home.


ELG: Yes.

Abel: But at that time, I think there was a program where it was more affordable to have a baby at home, and so my parents chose that option. And since then, well like I said, we’ve been coming and going.
I was born here, and when I was 11 months old we left for Mexico. We came back here when I was 6 or 7 for another 2 years, and I did first and second grade at Madison.

ELG: Mm-hm.

Abel: And then we went back to Mexico again. I did 4th, 5th, and 6th grade there. And then we came back again, this time for good to Santa Ana, and when I was 12 I started  7th grade at Lathrop. And, well, I’ve been more or less established here ever since. So it’s a little...


ELG: Yeah, how interesting. You’ve truly had an international childhood, right? Really, quite a mix of the two coutnries.

Abel: Yes. Well, most of my memories are from when I was in Mexico, you know? From those times. It was like a...a sort of strange lapse when I was here in first and second grade, for some reason I don’t remember much from that time. But when I was in Mexico, well, I remember a lot, even from back when I was in kindergarten.


ELG: And you always, always came back to Santa Ana. Always here.

Abel: Mm-hm. Yeah.

ELG: It’s really interesting, what you’re saying about a home birth. Because –well, as you know, these things aren’t really promoted here in the United States. There’s a lot of resistance from the medical profession, right? The medical establishment. Ah, in fact, I had my daughter, who-- in fact, is about your age, she’s 36-- at home, in the Bay Area in Northern California. And I had to search for a doctor that would assist in a home birth, and it was really quite a challenge. Because the medical association here doesn’t want it.

Abel: Yes, actually my partner and I are having a baby, a beautiful baby girl, and we are anticipating the same thing, right? That you go to the hospital and you have no control of the situation. There’s no humanity in the way the person giving birth is treated. That’s why we’re going to have the birth at home. I think there’s been a lot more learning lately about this, because now there’s like, a network of people doing partería or “midwifery” as they call it here--

ELG: Yeah.

Abel: --and they are interested in reviving these practices, right? So I think it’s pretty cool, to be able to go back and recover that. It’s really important to humanize giving birth.

ELG: Yea...it’s that, treating childbirth like a disease, it’s insane! Right? haha. The most fundamental moment in life, to treat it ike a disease, truly makes no sense. So, how cool, how awesome and of course, congratulations!


Abel: Mm, thank you.

INSERT #1 – ELG only
The medicalization of birth is a theme we need to think about here in the United States. The richest country in the world is #60 in the world when it comes to the health and suvival of mothers and babies. This unencouraging situation is a direct result of racism and sexism. A hundred years ago, the midwife was a broadly accepted figure across all USAmerican social classes. The great majority of midwives were women of color, many of them African-American. The medical establishment – made up largely of white men, of course – took control of birth away from midwives, and our for-profit medical system did the rest, turning birth into a very profitable industry.

This is not to say that medical advances aren’t useful and important when it comes to birth. For premature babies, for mothers with complications, medical science has been a blessing, of course. But for the 85% of births that are normal, the intervention of doctors and hospital surroundings simply are not necessary.

ELG: Ok, let’s talk about your profession. What work are you doing here in Santa Ana?

Abel: So, right now I’m working partly as a farmer. I’m part of an urban gardening cooperative called “Crece”, [or “Grow”]. It’s an up-and-coming cooperative that’s also an organization that promotes and advocates for members of our community that are involved with, or want to get involved with the field of food production, right? So, in my case, well, I’ve been taking part in urban agriculture for 5 or 6 years now. And I’ve had the chance to associate with, well, really create an association with a couple of other people. Jaime, for example, grows vegetables, but he’s also focussed on mushroom cultivation.

ELG: Ah!

Abel: Yeah, and so, we do it all together, because if we were working separately none of us would be able to sustain our projects, so we are coming together to support each other in creating a produce program, right? With organic boxes, or baskets, like they say in Mexico, where people are already subscribing. We provide a variety of organic produce every week, or every other week, or once a month, whatever the person wants. But yes, it’s a new project....but that’s basically the idea, to take control of our food system as a community, you know?


ELG: Yeah.

Abel: Let’s not even go into all the] problems with the current food system, it’s so damaging to the earth and to people working within the industry. So, we’re trying to change all that.


ELG: Yes, and again we’re talking about, like, the base. I mean, the most fundamental elements of life, right? Birth is one, another is our food. Exactly.

Abel: Mm-hm, yes, exactly.

ELG: How cool. And us urban folks a lot of the time we forget what good food is. Because there’s so much fast food everywhere, right? But growing and caring for a vegetable garden, growing plants, it makes you conscious of what food really is, and how it connects us to the land, right?

Abel: Yes, totally. The ability to grow your own food or to have more spaces like our farm, it’s a great resource, not only for the food, right? I also think of it in the most basic terms. Just being in a garden, it teaches you how to walk, no? Because you have to watch where you step. There have been people, volunteers, who enter the garden and we tell them “go grab a shovel”, or whatever, and they walk right over the planting beds! stepping on everything. And we’re saying “No, you can’t walk there. You have to watch where you’re walking, OK?” And even the way you walk [matters], right? I mean, you’re walking on your own food, you know?

ELG: [laughs] Yeah. I’d never thought about that. But, yeah, it’s true. Literally. The way we connect to the land with our feet. Huh.

Abel: Yes, exactly. And so there are many teachings. The simple act of being among the crops no? And it’s...and well, I’d like to also share, well since I’m going to be a father, I have the mentality that, like, this is for the next generations. I mean, what [spaces] will they have to talk to each other in? What will they talk about? How will they see themselves? What will they want to build?  And so I think we need more spaces like this one, so they have that foundation, right? To have that option of planting, as part of the conversation within their existence in an urban environment, you know? But it’s important that we work hard to be able to provide that resource.

ELG: Yes, yes, super important. It’s really beautiful work, really lovely, and I greatly respect it.  As you know I have—


Abel: Yeah, hehe.

ELG: --a little garden behind my house. And I could find something to be done there every hour of every day, and it’s a really small garden! But it demands quite a lit of attention and commitment. It demands a lot; but it also gives a lot. A whole lot. It’s a way to connect ourselves to this planet.


Abel: Yeah, I totally agree.

ELG: OK, well then, let’s get to the first song, the song you gave me that in some way represents where you come from. That represents your origins. All right… here it is: “Sobre las Olas”, or, “Over the Waves.”

MUSIC CLIP #1:
Juventino Rosas, “Sobre las olas,” Pedro Infante version

ELG: Awww...[both laugh] There’s a piece of old Mexico. All right, tell us a little bit about how this song entered your life, and why you chose it as the musical image of your origins.

Abel: Ah, well, it was pretty tough, no? Because thinking of my origins, well, in general I think of my my aunts, uncles, my mother, my parents’ music in general, which is rancheras, right? Which are... not so much regional, because the genre can be quite diverse regionally. But rancheras are something my uncles always listened to and still listen to in Mexico. In particular, Pedro Infante, beause my mom, and also my Uncle Salvador, who is one of the oldest of his generation, love Pedro Infante. My Uncle Salvador is always says things like “this singer is the boss”, right? –There are people that do voice impersonations, like comedians.

ELG: Ah, yeah.

Abel: And, in general they can do many people. There’s people that imitate Vicente Fernández, or even a couple that attempt José Alfredo Jiménez. But they say, “No one has ever been able to imitate Pedro Infante.” It’s just that voice he had.


ELG: Ahh, yeah, for sure.

Abel: And that’s why Pedro Infante in particular, since I grew up with his music, and my mom, when she’d do chores, or wash the laundry outside—because we all still did laundry by hand—well, not really “us,” it was all my mom-- well, that was the music she’d always be playing, right? She’s put it on at top volume and...[both laugh] and well....I think Pedro Infante was one of the most...was who we listened to the most. And I just wanted to mention that of all his music, because Pedro Infante sang in many styles, my favourite are his waltzes.


ELG: I see.

Abel: The waltzes. Because I like that style best. Especially this song. I‘m not sure if you recognize it, but it’s by Juventino Rosas, a Mexican composer.


ELG: Yeah!


Abel: It was really well-known, but once the waltz became very famous, and it was even being attributed to the Germans, who are know for their waltzes. But originally the music—

ELG: Yes, yes. It’s Mexican music. In fact, I’ll confess something to you. When doing my prep for this interview, I listened to the song several times and thought “Oh, yeah, I recognize this melody.” Everyone recognizes it, right? And I thought, “This composer Juventino Rosas, he stole it from German composers!” Because up until now I thought this super famous melody was by some famous waltz composer, like Johann Strauss.


Abel: [laughs] Yeah.

ELG: I was wrong! I did my research and, no! It’s a really famous melody, but it’s roots are Mexican. So I am duly corrected. [both laugh] And yeah, I didn’t know until now that Juventino Rosas composed this melody.


INSERT #2 – ELG + DC

NOTE: this is not a translation but discusses the same themes in each language.


ELG: So, Juventino Rosas, poor guy, he only lived to be twenty-six years old...

DC: Twenty- six. Wow.

ELG: I know, I know, and he was already an international sensation by the time he died. He was born in 1868 in Guanajuato and he died on tour in Cuba.

DC: Oh, wow.

ELG: And the poor guy! He was touring around as a violinist -- I think he was mostly a violinist -- constantly, because he was poor. He had a lot of trouble making ends meet, even though some of his published music got so very famous.

DC: And it did. It was very, very famous, this song.

ELG: Yeah, you know, this famous melody, [sings the opening] -- I don't sing it as nicely as Pedro Infante [both laugh]. But, it is popular in so many different genres now.

DC: Mm-hm.

ELG: It has gotten such broad distribution, not just as a waltz, but New Orleans jazz, bluegrass, country  Western, Old-Time fiddling, Tejano music, you name it.

DC: Mm hmm. It's gone everywhere, and like you said, Pedro just made the song classic, you know, with his voice and everything. And as Abel talks about in his in the interview, this song means so much to Abel, because Pedro means so much to so many people, not only as a musician and a Mexican, you know, he's become very much this symbol of Mexican culture. And I think this song encapsulates a lot of that.

ELG: Yeah, yeah, both the song itself and then this performance, the one, the performance that Abel chose, are just iconic.

DC: They are, yeah. And it's... I mean, not to make this particular discussion a debate on it, but I do always like to bring up the fact that while people like Pedro Infante became these symbols of national culture, Mexican national identity, and very much so mariachi music, well, he's very much associated with that music. These musics, specifically mariachi, has its roots in indigenous communities in Mexico and the colonial era, and all of those struggles, which sometimes aren't talked about all that much when Pedro Infante comes up. Abel sees him as very much this icon and this point of pride, which he is. And that's great. That should be the most important thing always. But I do like to always remind people, you know, a lot of these musics that we love so much, they have their roots in indigenous communities that sometimes aren't talked about all that much. And it's important to remember.

ELG: That's right, we touched on that briefly in the interview I did with Graciela Holguín --

DC: Mm hmm.

ELG: -- who also brought a lot of wonderful mariachi music to the table. And yeah, I remember mentioning that in that interview. And, just to close out this issue, of course, the waltz, or vals, as it's called in Spanish. Well, that was indigenous music, too. It just happened to be German indigenous peasants who invented that dance!

DC: Mm hmm.

ELG: So it's kind of interesting, this play of -- really international play of styles and origins for the music that becomes iconic to a nation.


ELG – But, returning to your reasons for choosing this song. It sounds like it’s just the voice alone of Pedro Infante that symbolizes or represents your childhood. Is that true? That voice-- much like you said, it’s without equal, it’s unique – and the very sound of his singing reminds you of when you were a child. Am I understanding that correctly?


Abel: Yes...In particular, that anecdote about when I was growing up, well I think it’s one of the things I appreciate about my uncles and my mom. They fostered a sense of pride in us, you know? Pride in being Mexican. And not only being Mexican, but also part of the community we come from. So, I think that when we talk about music, it’s like a support [to that pride]. My Uncle Salvador was a musician, he played in the wind band. He would say, “Listen to that voice, how it changes tones.” Well, the truth is I don’t know too much about music, but they wanted me to hear him, to foster that pride in me. “Listen to what a beautiful voice he has.” I think in my subconscious, I had this pride, where I’d say “Wow! we have amazing composers, and not only composers but singers too, no?”


ELG: Yeah.

Abel: It’s one of those memories that I have that takes me back to that childhood in Mexico, learning those lessons, you know?

ELG: What a lovely memory. And, perhaps you can dance the waltz? [chuckles]

Abel:  Ahhh.... More or less. At school we had to do dance performances. If your listeners have heard about schools in Mexico, well every year you have to do a dance performance for Mother’s Day or graduation. And, well, many of the dances we’d have to do were waltzes.


ELG: Huh, interesting, because according to my research, Rosas’ Waltz was composed in 1885, so way before your Uncle Salvador’s time. So, it’s really a reflection of a very long-gone era right? An old chapter in the history of Mexico, and the world really.
At that time the waltz was in fashion, in a way we can’t imagine today. Everyone, or at least everyone “respectable,” knew how to dance the waltz. And that knowledge has gotten somewhat lost nowadays.

Abel: Mm. Yes...

ELG: At least it is preserved, at least somewhat, in the schools of Mexico. That’s neat.


Abel: Yeah, and to some degree it’s for the quinceañeras, right? Because the waltz, ahh, the principal dance of the quinceañera, I believe, when the do the whole ritual of the girl becoming a woman, the dance with the chambelán or escort, is a waltz.

ELG: Yeah, yeah, it hadn’t ocurred to me, but you’re right. And it seems to me that everything about the quinceañeras  is a bit “in the old style”, no? I mean the dresses they wear, are, well, from the nineteenth century, right? Just like the waltz.


Abel: Yeah, it’s very influenced by, well, European culture, right? Like “Beauty and the Beast”, it makes me think of Beauty and Beast.” [both laugh]


ELG: [laughing] Yeah.

Abel: But, look, if I can share with you something I find interesting, because, in the conversations I’ve had with my mom, or when my uncles get together and talk amongst themselves, I’ve heard them talk about how Pedro Infante, ranchera music, all that, music that for some is the music of that generation, -- well, in fact it wasn’t very popular with my grandparents. In fact, my grandparents didn’t like rancheras.
When I asked my mom what kind of music my grandfather listened to, she said he really liked Argentinean music, he listened to the radio, and in those times there weren’t many radio stations, -- and probably even fewer, when he was young, -- but my mom said he enjoyed music from Argentina.
And that he felt that rancheras were a bit embarassing, no? At that time, well my grandfather grew up during the time of the Revolution, in the early nineteen hundreds.

________________________________________
INSERT #3 – ELG only

It’s so interesting what Abel tells us about his grandfather’s musical tastes. I imagine that at that time, in Tlachichila, Zacatecas, the town benefitted from the RPM, Radio Programas de Mexico, a federal inicitive of 1941 that promoted the creation of various regional radio stations and supported them with programming and announcers. And as for the Argentine music that Abels grandfather preferred, well, it could have been Atahualpa Yupanqui or another singer-songwriter from the great flourishing of Argentine song in the middle of the 20th century. Alberto Cortez, the Argentine songer-songwriter that Abel chose for his second song, was the next generation of that tradition. And so the threads of taste and tradition braid themselves together across the decades!

ELG: Mm-hm. Mmmm. Yes, musical tastes have changed quite a bit I think.
And especially outside of the Capital, right? A lot of ups and downs in enthusiasm for that regional music. it has to do with how pride is tied in with nationalism. Or as you just said, that community pride, which is another thing entirely. And...really interesting, really interesting. Yeah and...Many times in these interviews, I find myself hearing memories of my interviewees’ grandparents. And many of them lived through the Revolution. And the influence that time had on people’s lives even today is striking.


Abel: Mm-hm.

ELG: It’s had a great influence on life in the present day. And on music of course. So...well, how cool! I think it’s time to move on to the second song, which talks a bit about, well, your hopes, or as you put it, your aspirations for the future. And that song is “Castillos en el aire", or “Castles in the Air,” by Alberto Cortez. And I have to thank you for introducing me to this song, because it’s...it’s really something!


MUSIC CLIP #2a
Alberto Cortez, “Castillos en el aire” (1st part of the song)

ELG: Ahh, what a great song. OK—

Abel: Joyful!

ELG: Joyful! it’s authentic joy, right? But it’s funny, I think, because it actually talks about serious issues, but in a way that is light...All right. How does this represent your hopes, Abel?

Abel: No, like you mention, I mean, the second question, [about] what represents my hopes? Ahh, well… I grew up with urban rock, [you know?].

ELG: Uh huh.

Abel: Not very hopeful stuff, right? It’s really, well it’s often very serious in tone, and much of the time, just speaking to the realities of [urban] life. But this song [by Cortez], it’s also talking about realities that we live, you know? As people, like, I think it really connects me to the essence of being a child, no? We all grow up with the...I mean, the [idea that the] impossible doesn’t exist.

ELG: Yeah, it’s that second part, that “doo, doo, doo, doo...” [singing softly]

Abel: Yeah.
___________________________________
INSERT #4 – ELG + DC

NOTE: this is not a translation but has the same themes in each language.


DC: OK, so we have "Castles in the sky," right, Elisabeth?

ELG: Yep, we sure do.

DC: [So this song... I think it's great that Abel chose this song because in it, I think I'm able to see many, many layers of who he is. But before we get into that, maybe we should talk a little bit about what's going on musically and who the singer is. So the singer is Alberto Cortez, a very famous Argentinian singer who actually had his first major job singing for the "Orquesta San Francisco Jazz." So I spent about an hour trying to make sure that this wasn't San Francisco, like my San Francisco -- I'm from, I was born in Oakland. San Francisco Bay Area is my home. And I'm like, "There's no way that he could be from there and I not know it!"

ELG: [laughs] Yeah.

DC: Correct, he's not. There's the "San Francisco Jazz de Buenos Aires." So there it is, that's what it was... That's what that was. He studied social sciences, but then transferred or I should say, moved over to music full time and then went on to become one of the most famous, sought-after singer-songwriters in Latin America. And I think we can see that quality and that caliber in this song. There's a lot of familiarity with different types of music. I heard a lot of familiarity with jazz, but I think most of all, I love how this song is so dynamic. And most people might think that music from South America or music from Latin America in general is only one way, it's either something like mariachi or something like salsa, perhaps. But in this song, we can see that South American music and Latin American music is so dynamic. There's so much going on, it's so creative. It's so... what I will call polycultural. And I just really, really love that about this song.

ELG: Yeah, it... Well, you know, dynamic it certainly is. I mean, it's kind of two songs jammed together and it's interesting, you know, that you hear jazz in the influence, because I, with my classical training, I hear classical music in that opening, which is like kind of hyper dramatic, it's a little bit operatic. And I think he's making fun of the operatic trope --

DC: [Mm hmm.

ELG: -- with this, you know, very dark beginning. And then, you know, at a certain point, there comes this [sings a bit of the second part] And it's, you know, it's just every bit the opposite. And they're in the same song, which is, of course, the whole point of the message of the song: the conflict between adulthood and in childhood that we all carry, no matter what age we are, we all carry within us. I came across a phrase when I was researching Cortez that I like a lot, that he was called "the singer-songwriter of simple things."

DC: Beautiful. I love it.

ELG: Yeah, isn't that nice?

DC: Mm hmm.

ELG: And it really… I mean, this song is as simple as it could be, and it's so effective!

DC: Mm hmm.

MUSIC CLIP #2b
“Castillos en el aire,” the second part

ELG: -- I mean, it almost sounds like a children’s song, right? It’s quite notable. I was here, like, nodding my head, dancing a lttle, because that’s the sound. But yeah, the song, the lyrics talk about a real conflict between...he calls it “sanity,” and love. And...is there such a conflict in your life? Do you ever find yourself wanting to fly and not being able to? How do you relate to the song?

Abel: The song, like you say, talks about this conflict...I sort of see it as this adaptation that they call “adulting.” There are so many ideas, right? About what it is to be an adult. And often it means not idealizing the future anymore, right? And, I mean, I include myself among the...among those who are doing projects that support, let’s say, a different kind of future, right? In terms of community.


ELG:  Yeah.

Abel: And for a lot of people, that’s not realistic, right? It’s something someone does when they’re young, in their “rebellious phase”, we could say. Some of depict it like that. And then the moment arrives when you’re supposed to get serious, figure out your life, get a secure job without many risks.
And I think the way I relate to this song is that we’re creating, like, a cooperative, or an alternative approach to food.
And in one way, that makes me a dreamer. But on the other hand, I’m taking concrete steps, right?
And, well, on a personal level I think in some ways I connect to that energy, you know?
Relating to people who have that essence, that want that essential connection with themselves. And aren’t so caught up in what the media shows us, right? What institutions are telling us about how we should think.

ELG: I’ll tell you something, a few hours ago I was doing a bit of research on Emma Goldman. She was a Russian who emigrated to the United States in the early 20th century, and became an anarchist. She was quite famous. And there’s a quote that’s attributed to her. You hear it all over the place. It turns out she never said it, but it doesn’t really matter; the quote is quite lovely. In Spanish it would be "Si no puedo bailar, no quiero [ser] parte de tu revolución." or, in English: “ If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.”

Abel: Wow! Hahaha.

ELG:  And I think that it expresses very neatly something that this song expresses too. The importance of flying, the importance of spreading your wings—metaphorically speaking of course—it’s real, it’s profound. We have to dance, to be a bit frivolous sometimes, right? But the paradox is that it’s actually quite important. It’s really serious, the need to be joyful and frivolous from time to time.

Abel: Yeah, I completely agree with you.
I think for me, my “dance” we could say, is the day to to ability to grow crops, you know?  On the farm, no? And being able to do this practice, farming for me—well I don’t see it as a job, as work; It’s more like a way to clear my mind. A way to center myself again. I imagine, I’d like to think that every person has a way of connecting to that center of themselves. And many times, like the song says, well “what an idiot.” You can’t do that because you have all these responsibilities. Or whatever it may be.


ELG: Yeah, that we all have enough faith in ourselves, to be idiots every now and then, right? [laughs] Well yeah, and I really love the image of the garden as a dance floor, so to speak.

Abel: Exactly.

ELG: Sometimes, when I’m weeding in my own garden, I picture the whole garden as a party. And the so-called weeds are the uninvited guests. It’s another way of imagining it, I suppose...


But yes, I believe that continuing to move forward, to have faith in life, it’s like a dance—to return to the metaphor—it’s like a dance between the adult, as you say, and the frivolous, or well, joy that can’t be explained. The pure joy of being alive, right? --But now I think we are approaching the end of the interview. Is there anything else you’d like to day about the Cortez song, or about the themes that we’ve discussed in the songs?

Abel: No, I’m think I’m satisifed there. Just very grateful to have been able to have this conversation with you.

ELG: Me too.

Abel: it’s been the highlight of my day!

ELG: That’s great. Yes, exactly. I’m very thankful, because every story that comes out in these interviews is a treasure.


Abel: Well, I agree. And it’s that...I don’t know how much time we have, or if it’s part of the program, but I’d be interested to hear from you, well, a song for your origins, and a song for your hopes.

ELG: Hahaha, Yes, of course, of course! Of course, I’ve thought about it a lot.

Abel: Mm-hm.

ELG: And... [sighs] I’d say that a song that really represents where I’m from would be...It’s classical music, a piano concerto by Robert Schumann, who was a nineteenth century German composer. It’s beautiful, very romantic and passionate.


MUSIC CLIP #3, Schumann piano concerto

ELG. And when I was 14 or 15 years old, I fell in love with this concerto. So for me, the music that represents my origins, the music that I loved and studied as an adolescent, the music I dedicated my—well, it was my career for twenty years – is not my music anymore. And that is a painful thing for me. So there’s a bit of conflict in that story, right?

Abel: I find it interesting that you were interested in that musical genre from a young age.

ELG: Oh yes, passionately. I fell in love with that music, and I still love it. But I can’t listen to it now, because it brings up several layers of painful and conflict-ridden memories, and because of that I’ve taken a bit of distance [from it.] And, OK, briefly, for the future…Well, I’ll tell you that for me, the music that energizes me most, and fills me with hope—this sounds strange, but it’s the truth... It’s my own music! From time to time, not very often, but from time to time, I write songs. Sometimes they are sones in the jaranera tradition, no? and sometimes they’re more like folk music. But I do it purely in the spirit of play. It’s that, after so many years as a professional musician, during which music was like any other commodity to sell, now I get to direct [myself toward] my own musics. I don’t think they are particularly good, [both laugh] but they give me pleasure and relief, a very strong feeling of joy. So for me, those particular songs are my hope. Yeah.


Abel: Ah, how cool, that’s awesome.

ELG: And thank for asking. What a good question!

Abel: [laughs] Of course, thank you for sharing. And...if some day you’re willing to share, I’d like to hear one of your songs.

ELG: Well, I’m thinking about it, I’m thinking about it. I’d like to record my songs...OK, well then, Abel, I think it’s time to say goodbye, and well, I leave you with many thanks for sharing your perspective about life and music. It’s a privilege to hear it.

Abel: Ah no, thank you. Thank you Elisabeth. Thanks for the invitation, and well, yeah, my heart is very happy to have had this opportunity,

ELG: Ah, thank you. Well, me too, me too. Many thanks and you and your family take care. When is the due date, more or less?


Abel: Ah, at the end of July. July 28th supposedly, that’s what the doctors think.

ELG: Well I’m very, like the whole community, I’m very excited for you guys, and I wish you all the good things and joy during these moments. It’s a very special time.

Abel: Yes, thank you so much. I’m personally super excited, and well, I can’t wait to meet little Tlalli!

ELG: Oh, my goodness... Well, OK, have a great evening, a good weekend, and we’ll be in touch.

Abel: For sure, Elisabeth, yes, thanks so much. Have a good day.

ELG: Yeah, yeah, great, thanks Abel. See you soon.

Abel: See you soon.

ELG: Chao.

OUTRO

We didn’t play an example of the music that represents my hopes for the future, because you’re going to hear one very soon: the song with which we close every episode, [sing it] “Si yo fuera una canción…” –well, it’s by me!

Meanwhile: we have put links to CRECE, the community garden cooperative with which Abel works, on our website, siyofuera.org. We hope you’ll explore them and get inspired!

Would you like to know more?

On our website at siyofuera.org, you can find complete transcripts in both languages of every interview, our Blog about the issues of history, culture, and politics that come up around every song, links for listeners who might want to pursue a theme further, and some very cool imagery. You’ll find playlists of all the songs from all the interviews to date, and our special Staff-curated playlist as well.

We invite your comments or questions! Contact us at our website or participate in the Si Yo Fuera conversation on social media. We’re out there on FaceBook and Instagram. And then there’s just plain old word of mouth. If you like our show, do please tell your friends to give it a listen. And do please subscribe, on any of the major podcast platforms. We’ll bring a new interview for you, every two weeks on Friday mornings.


Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, and Wesley McClintock are our sound engineers; Zoë Broussard and Laura Díaz hold down the marketing; David Castañeda is Music Researcher; Jen Orenstein translates interviews to and from Spanish; Deyaneira García and Alex Dolven make production possible. We are a not-for-profit venture, currently and gratefully funded by the John Paul Simon Guggenheim Foundation, UCLA’s Faculty Grants Program, and the Herb Alpert School of Music.


For now, and until the next interview—keep listening to one another!
I’m Elisabeth Le Guin, and this is, “Si yo fuera una canción -- If I were a song…”

Español

INTRO
Saludos y bienvenidxs al episodio más reciente de “Si yo fuera una canción.” Somos un podcast y programa de radio, en donde la gente de Santa Ana, California nos cuenta en sus propias palabras, de las músicas que más le importan.


ELG: Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, la anfitriona del programa, y Directora del proyecto.
Este proyecto se basa en mi convicción que nosotrxs, la gente del mundo moderno, necesitamos aprender a mejor escucharnos; y que la música, con todo lo que nos conlleva, es el lugar perfecto para empezar.

DAVID: Mi nombre es David Castañeda, investigador de música aquí en el podcast SYFUC. Estoy muy feliz de ser parte de este proyecto, utilizando mi entrenamiento académico y mi experiencia profesional como músico, para traerles las historias, la música y las experiencias vividas de quienes viven aquí en Santa Ana.

ENTREVISTA
ELG: Pues bienvenido. Y Abel, te voy a pedir a presentarte a los y las que nos escuchan, eh? Con tu nombre completo y, si quieres, tu edad; y unos datos sobre tu vida. ¿Cómo es que llegaste aquí a Santa Ana, y cuál es tu oficio? Cosas de esta índole. Así que, cuando quieras.

Abel: Sí, muchas gracias Elisabeth. Es de..pues muchas gracias por la invitación a compartir este espacio. Está muy interesante el proyecto. Mi nombre es Abel Ruiz García, soy originario de una comunidad en Zacatecas que se llama Tlachichila. Tlachichila, Zacatecas, México. Yo actualmente tengo 37 años. Ya, ya ¡estoy perdiendo la cuenta! Sí, tengo 37 años, y aquí llevo en Santana...híjole, pues ¡llegué a los 12 años! Bueno, la historia de mi familia aquí en Santa Ana pues ha sido un va y viene, ¿no? Es de... Yo de hecho aquí nací, nací en Santa Ana, en una casa que está acá por la Hazard, que se llama la calle. Mi madre dió un parto en, pues en casa, creo que porque... Ahorita es muy popular por un montón de razones, ¿no? Que la gente lo hace en casa.

ELG: Sí.

Abel: Pero en ese tiempo creo que había un programa donde era más barato, hacer un parto en casa y pues mi mis padres optaron por hacer eso. Y de allí, pues, ha sido como te decía, un va y viene. Yo nací aquí; a los 11 meses nos fuimos para México. Regresamos cuando yo tenía como unos 6 o 7 años por otros dos años, y crucé como primero y segundo en la Madison.

ELG: Mm-hm.

Abel: Y de ahí ya nos regresamos otra vez. Ah, hice cuarto, quinto y sexto en México otra vez. Y ya nos regresamos, ahora sí de planta para Santa Ana, y desde los 12 años empecé el séptimo grado en la Lathrop. Y pues he estado, pues ya más establecido aquí desde entonces. Entonces es un poquito....

ELG: Sí, qué interesante. Realmente una niñez internacional, ¿no? Muy, muy mezclada entre los dos países.

Abel: Sí. Bueno, pues, la mayoría de mis recuerdos vienen de México, ¿no? Como en ese tiempo. Fue como un...un lapso medio extraño entre cuando estábamos aquí en primero y segundo, por alguna razón no me acuerdo de muchas memorias de ese tiempo. Pero cuando estaba en México, pues me recuerdo muchas cosas, como inclusive cuando estaba en el Kinder.

ELG: Y siempre, siempre regresando a Santa Ana. Siempre aquí.

Abel: Mm-hm. Sí.

ELG: Es muy interesante, lo que dices sobre el parto en casa. Porque --pues como sabes, estas cosas no se promueven aquí en Estados Unidos. Es que hay mucha resistencia en la profesión de médicos, ¿no? El gremio de médicos. Ah, y de hecho tuve a mi hija, que es -- bueno, justamente de tu edad, tiene 36 -- tuve a mi hija en casa, allá en la Bahía, al norte de California. Y tuve que buscar un médico que podía atender un parto en casa, y era todo un rollo, realmente. Porque es que el gremio de médicos aquí no quiere.


Abel: Sí, de hecho, pues mi pareja y yo estamos esperando un niño, una bella niña, y creo que teníamos a esa expectativa, ¿no? De que en los hospitales, pues entras y no hay control, no hay un tratamiento humano a la persona que va a dar a luz. Por eso vamos a hacer parto en casa. Pues creo que en este temporada pues ha sido mucho aprendizaje porque, pues, sí hay una red de personas que están haciendo partería, como se dice, "midwifery" que le dicen en inglés--

ELG: Sí.

Abel: --y están interesadas en recobrar esas prácticas, ¿no? Entonces se me hace muy chido, de poder volver a recuperar eso. Es muy importante, poder humanizar el parto.

ELG: Sí... Es que, lo de tratar el parto como una enfermedad, ¡es una locura! ¿No? Jeje. La cosa más fundamental de la vida, como enfermedad, realmente no tiene sentido. Así que, qué chido, que chido, y felicidades, por supuesto.

Abel: Mm, muchas gracias.

ENCARTE #1 – ELG sola
La medicalización del parto es un tema digno de pensar para nosotrxs que vivimos in Estados Unidos. El país más rico del mundo es #60 en el mundo en cuanto a la salud y tasa de sobrevivencia entre las madres y bebés. Esta situación nada alentadora tiene raíces en el racismo y el sexismo; hace 100 años, el oficio de partera estaba ampliamente aceptada entre todos los estamentos sociales estadounidenses. La gran mayoría de las parteras de ese entonces eran mujeres de color, muchas de ellas afro-americanas. El establecimiento medico -- compuesto de hombres blancos, por supuesto -- les restó el control del parto; y un sistema médica con fines de lucro hizo el resto, convirtiéndolo en toda una industria muy rentable.

Esto no es decir que los avances médicos no sirvan en torno al nacimiento. Para los bebés que llegan muy antes de tiempo, para las mamás con complicaciones, ha sido una bendición, claro. Pero para el 85% de los partos que salen normales, las intervenciones de médicos y los entornos de hospitales simplemente no son necesarios.

ELG: Bueno. Háblanos un rato a tu oficio. ¿En qué trabajas aquí en Santa Ana? Y todo eso.

Abel: Ahorita actualmente soy, por una parte, un agricultor. Soy parte de una cooperativa que se llama "Crece," [de] huertos urbanos. Es una cooperativa que está emergiendo. Pues bueno, es cooperativa, también es una organización que promueve y aboga por personas en nuestra comunidad que está[n] haciendo o está[n] interesada[s] o está[n] entrando al campo de producción de alimentos, ¿no? Entonces, en mi caso, pues yo llevo algunos años ya, como 5 o 6 años, practicando la agricultura urbana. Y he podido, pues asociarme, o crear una asociación con otros dos compañeros. En el caso de Jaime, pues sí hace hortalizas, pero también se enfoca en la producción de hongos.

ELG: ¡Ah!

Abel: Sí. Entonces, y todos juntos, porque por nuestra propia cuenta no podríamos hacer un proyecto sustentable, pues nos estamos uniendo para poder apoyarnos unos a los otros en crear un programa de de hortalizas, ¿no? De cajas orgánicas, o canastas orgánicas, que se dicen en México, donde ya la gente se suscribe. Nosotros proveemos una variedad de cultivos cada semana o para otra semana, o una vez al mes, como lo [prefiere?] la persona. Pero sí, es un proyecto emergente… En largos rasgos esa es la idea, poder tomar control como comunidad de nuestro sistema alimentario, ¿no?

ELG: Sí.

Abel: --Que ni siquiera entremos a todos los problemas que tiene el sistema alimentario actual, y los daños que le da a la tierra, y también a la gente que trabaja en estas industrias. Entonces estamos tratando de cambiar todo eso.
ELG: Sí, y otra vez estamos hablando de, como la base. Bueno, los elementos más fundamentales de la vida, ¿no? Es que el nacimiento sí es uno, y otro son los alimentos. Exactamente.

Abel: Mm-hm, exacto, sí.

ELG: Qué chido. Y con eso, para la gente urbana, muchas veces es que perdimos la conciencia de lo que es buena comida. Por la cantidad de comida rápida que hay en todos lados, ¿no? Y esto de criar y cuidar un una hortaliza, y criar las plantas es que uno cobra conciencia de lo que es la comida. Y cómo nos conecta a la tierra, ¿verdad?

Abel: Sí, totalmente. El poder crecer tu propia comida o tener más espacios, como la granja que tenemos nosotros, pues es un gran recurso, no sólo por lo alimentario, ¿no? Creo que es inclusive en la forma más básica. El estar en una granja te enseña cómo caminar, ¿no? Porque tienes que ver por dónde estás caminando. Ha habido gente o voluntarios que entran a la granja, y pues les decimos, "Ve a agarrar una pala," o lo que sea, y cortan por todo el barbecho, así como pisando por todo. Y no, pues estamos diciendo, "No puedes caminar por ahí, tienes. Tienes que ver por dónde caminas, ¿no?" Y pues inclusive la forma en que uno camina, lo influye a uno, ¿no? pues estás caminando en tu propia comida, no?

ELG: [se ríe] Sí. Nunca lo había pensado. Pero, sí es verdad. Literalmente. Cómo nos conectamos a la tierra con los pies. Qué cosa.

Abel: Sí, exactamente. Y pues así hay muchas enseñanzas. El simple hecho de estar entre los cultivos, ¿no? Y es de...pues me gustaría compartir también, pues de hecho porque voy a ser papá, pues tengo esa mentalidad de que, cómo es de que nuestras propias próximas generaciones, pues, ¿qué van a tener ellos para poder tener pláticas entre ellos mismos, entre ellxs? En quiénes son, o ¿qué es lo que quieren construir más? Y pues creo que se ocupan más espacios como éstos, para que ellos tengan esta base, ¿no? De tener el cultivo, como una conversación más, entre su existencia en una zona urbana ¿no? Pero es importante que nosotros laboremos para poder proveer ese recurso.

ELG: Sí, sí. Súper importante. Es un trabajo realmente muy lindo, muy lindo, y lo respeto enormemente. Como sabes, yo tengo--

Abel: Sí, jeje.

ELG: --un jardincito atrás de mi casa. Bueno, me podría ocupar todas las horas de todos los días, y ¡es muy chiquito como jardín! Pero es que pide una un nivel de atención y de compromiso impresionante. Pide mucho, pero también da mucho, muchísimo. Es un modo de conectarnos con este planeta.

Abel: Sí, de acuerdo. Sí, totalmente.

ELG: Ah, pues entonces, pasemos a la primera canción, a la canción que me diste, que representa de alguna manera, de dónde eres. Representa tus orígenes.
Bueno, aquí va "Sobre las olas.”

CLIP DE MÚSICA #1:
Juventino Rosas, “Sobre las olas,” versión de Pedro Infante

ELG: Awww...[los dos se ríen] Ahí está un pedacito del viejo México. Pues, cuéntanos un poco de cómo llegó esta canción en tu vida, y por qué lo elegiste como el imagen musical de tus orígenes.

Abel: Ah, pues fue muy difícil, ¿no? Porque al pensar sobre mis orígenes, pues en general, la música de mis tíos y de mi mamá y de mis padres en general, pues son como las rancheras, ¿no? Son música que... no tanto regional, porque inclusive el género como regional pues es bastante diverso. Pero las rancheras en particular, pues son como una música que mis tíos la escuchan y la siguen escuchando allá en México. En particular a Pedro Infante, porque a mi mamá y también a mi tío Salvador, por ejemplo, siendo uno de los más viejos de su generación. Pues es, como, amante de Pedro Infante, ¿no? Dice tantas cosas como, "Este cantante es el mero fregón," ¿no? --Hay como gente que imita las voces, así como comediantes.

ELG: Ah, sí.

Abel: Y por lo general pueden imitar a mucha gente. Hay gente que imita a éste, Vicente Fernández, o inclusive hay uno que otro que se avienta por imitar a José Alfredo Jiménez. Pero dicen, “Pedro Infante nunca nadie la ha podido igualar.” Es la voz que tenía.

ELG:  Ahh, fíjate, si sí.

Abel: Y por esa razón Pedro Infante en particular, como crecí con su música y mi mamá, pues cuando hacía quéhacer o cuando lavaba afuera -- porque todos nosotros todavía lavábamos a mano -- pues nosotros, a mi mamá, ¡“nosotros” dijo la mosca! --pues eso era la música que rifaba?, ¿no? Se ponía la grabadora todo [volumen] y....[se ríen los dos] Y es de… Creo que Pedro Infante era uno de los más… que escuchábamos más.
Nada más que quería mencionar que entre esa música -- bueno, Pedro Infante cantaba bastantes variedades de música, pero de los que me gustan más son los Vals de Pedro Infante.

ELG: Anjá.

Abel: Los valses. Porque, pues me gusta más el estilo, ¿no? En particular esta canción. Pues no sé si lo identificas, pero es de Juventino Rosas, un compositor mexicano.

ELG: ¡Sí!

Abel: Fue muy reconocido, pero después el vals se hizo muy famoso y hasta los estaban [achacando?] a los alemanes, que son muy buenos para los valses. Pero originalmente la música --

ELG: Sí, sí. Es música mexicana. De hecho, te confieso algo. Es que, haciendo mis preparaciones para esta entrevista, es que escuché varias veces la canción y pensé, "Ah, sí, reconozco esta melodía." Todo el mundo lo reconoce, ¿verdad? Y pensaba, "Ay, pero este compositor, Juventino Rosas, ¡es que robó la melodía de los compositores alemanes!” Porque yo pensaba, hasta el día de hoy, pensaba que la melodía tan famosa era de algún compositor de valses como Johann Strauss.

Abel: [se ríe] Sí.

ELG: ¡Fue un error! Hice mis investigaciones, y ¡no! Es una melodía súper famosa, pero mexicana de raíz. Así que estoy debidamente corregida. [se ríen los dos] Y bueno, sí, no sabía hasta hoy que era Juventino Rosas que compuso esta melodía.

ENCARTE #2 – ELG + DC

NOTA: no es una traducción, sino trata de temas parecidos. Los diálogos de encartes se hablan de manera improvisada

ELG: Pues ese Juventino Rosas, el pobre se murió a los 26 años.

DC: Guau, qué tristeza, guau.

ELG. Sí, es que estaba en gira en Cuba. Era mexicano, pero bueno, es que [en] la vida cortita que tenía, es que sufría la pobreza. Y estaba como haciendo giras, como músico, o como violinista -- que era violinista – constantemente, no más para ganar la vida. Y, a la vez es que compuso, bueno, varios bailes de salón. Era compositor sobre todo de bailes. Y entre ellos este súper famoso, "Sobre las olas," que se compuso en 1888. Y, bueno...la melodía tan famosa ¿no? Es que [tararea la melodía] Es divertido cantarla! Bueno, no sueno tan bien como Pedro Infante. [los dos se ríen]

DC: Está bien, está bien.

ELG: Pero sí, es genial la melodía, no?

DC: Sí.

ELG: Y la cosa es que, como dije en la entrevista, es que muchos, incluso yo, han pensado que era un vals de Alemania, que es un poco... es una ironía, no? Que la fama se robó del compositor, en cierto sentido, ¿no?

DC: Sí. Bueno, para mí es muy interesante que Abel eligiera esta hermosa canción cantada por el gran Pedro Infante, porque recientemente terminé mi disertación, y en ella entrevisté a Lupita Infante, que es la nieta de Pedro.

ELG: No me digas.

DC: Y... Sí, sí, Lupita Infante. Y ella es una maravillosa cantante. Está mezclando música mexicana y, bueno, deberíamos decir tradicional con Pop.

ELG: Anjá. Me interesa mucho, el hecho de que has escrito toda una tesis doctoral que incluye esta figura que es nieta de Pedro Infante.

DC: Sí.

ELG: Y bueno, lo de la música tradicional, por ejemplo: creo que tienes cosas que decir en torno al mariachi, que es la música con que se conecta Pedro Infante típicamente.

DC: Sí, sí. Bueno, porque Abel mencionó que... Lo mucho que Infante, Pedro Infante, significa para él como mexicano y también como músico. Y... yo creo que eso es lo más importante aquí. Pero también debemos recordar que Pedro Infante era y sigue siendo una parte importante en la creación de lo que es el mariachi, ¿no? Y aunque el mariachi se haya convertido en un símbolo de la cultura mexicana, esa música tiene sus raíces en los pueblos indígenas de México, así como en la época colonial y todo eso. Y realmente no se habla mucho. Debemos recordar eso. Yo creo.

ELG: Sí, sí. Y de hecho, brevemente en otra entrevista, la que realicé hace tiempo con Graciela Holguín, que ella trajo un montón de mariachi a su entrevista. Y yo me sentía un poco obligada a recordar el hecho de que el mariachi mismo tiene raíces indígenas y así que escuchamos un ratito del mariachi antiguo en esa entrevista. Así que sí, es importante recordarlo. Estoy de acuerdo... Y nomás voy a añadir una curiosidad que es --

DC: Por favor, si.

ELG: -- de hecho, el vals, bueno, es un baile con raíces alemanas. Pero era en su día, en el siglo XVIII, era un baile de campesinos.

DC: Guau.

ELG: Campesinos alemanes.

DC :¡Oh, guau!

ELG: Así que, en efecto, los indígenas de Alemania de ese entonces, [el vals] era su música. Así que estamos ante una red increíble de orígenes de músicas que siempre tienen raíces entre los pueblos, ¿no? Y luego llegan a ser fenómenos interculturales, internacionales, como el vals en su día. Y bueno, como Juventino Rosas también, que ganó una fama como compositor de esta melodía genial.

DC: Sí, exacto

ELG -- Pero regresando un poco a los motivos para tu elección. Es que suena como si fuera más bien la mera voz de Pedro Infante, que simboliza o que representa esa época de tu niñez. ¿Es verdad? Es que esa voz -- que tal como dices, es una voz inigualable, es una voz única -- es que es el mero sonido de su canto que te recuerda la infancia. ¿Entiendo correctamente?

Abel: Sí... En particular, ese anécdota de cuando estaba creciendo o de niño, pues creo que es una de las cosas que aprecio de mis tíos o de mi mamá. Pues se nos inculcó como cierto orgullo, ¿no? de ser mexicano. No sólo de ser mexicano, sino también [de] ser parte de la comunidad donde somos nosotros. Entonces, creo que es cuando hablamos de música, siempre como un respaldo. Es como lo que me contaba mi tio Salvador, ¿no? Él era músico, él tocaba en la banda de viento. Y él se ponía, "Escucha esa voz. Como cambian los tonos." Pues yo la verdad no sé mucho de música, pero se me ponía pues, a inculcarme, no? "Fíjate qué bonita voz tiene." Creo que mi subconsciente me creó como ese orgullo de decir, "¡Guau! Tenemos pues, chingones compositores, no sólo compositores, sino también cantores, no?"

ELG: Sí.

Abel: Es una de esas memorias que me lleva a esa niñez creciendo en México. Captando a esas lecciones, ¿no?

ELG: Qué bonita memoria. Y ¿tal vez, sabes cómo bailar el vals? [se carcajea]


Abel: Ahhh... Más o menos. Nos ponían en la escuela a bailar, en los bailables. Y si tu audiencia ha escuchado sobre la escuela en México, pues cada año uno tiene que hacer como un bailable en el Día de las Madres o en la graduación. Y pues, alguno de los muchos bailes que nos ponían a bailar, eran vals.

ELG: Pues interesante, porque según mis investigaciones, este vals de Rosas se compuso en el año mil ochocientos ochenta y cinco, así que muy antes de la vida de tu tío Salvador. Así que realmente es un reflejo de una época ya muy, muy pasada, no? Una época antigua de la historia, bueno, de México y del mundo. Y es que el vals en ese entonces era de moda, de una manera que ahora no podemos imaginar. Es que todo el mundo, o todo el mundo "respetable," sabía como bailar el vals. Y ahora se ha perdido algo este conocimiento...

Abel: Mm. Sí...

ELG: Por lo menos, lo preservan, o algo parecido, en las escuelas de México. Qué lindo.


Abel: Sí, y pues, en cierta forma también existe por las quinceañeras, no? Porque el Vals ahh, el baile principal de la quinceañera, creo, que cuando hacen todo ese ritual de que se va a convertir en mujer, el baile con el chambelán es un vals.

ELG: Sí, sí. No lo había pensado, pero tienes razón. Y bueno, a mí me parece que todo lo de las quinceañeras es algo "al estilo antiguo, ¿no? Es que estos vestidos que llevan, son de, bueno, del siglo XIX, ¿verdad? Tal como el vals.


Abel: Sí, es como muy influido por, digamos, como una cultura europea, no? Como "Beauty and the Beast." Me hace, me la imagino como "Beauty and the Beast." [se ríen los dos]

ELG: [riéndose] Sí.

Abel: Pero fíjate, si puedo compartirte que se me hace interesante, porque en las pláticas que tengo con mi mamá o cuando se juntan los tíos y se ponen a platicar con unos, entre ellos, yo escuchaba de que de hecho la música de Pedro Infante, las rancheras y todo eso, que son para otros, la música de esa generación, pues de hecho no era muy popular con mis abuelos. De hecho a mis abuelos no les gustaban las rancheras. Cuando le pregunté a mi mamá sobre qué música escuchaba  mi abuelo y ella decía que le gustaba mucho la música argentina, escuchaba un radio y no había muchas estaciones de radio en ese tiempo, ni mucho menos, me imagino, cuando mi abuelo estaba creciendo, pero decía mi mamá que le gustaba la música argentina. Y que se le hace como medio bochornoso la música de las rancheras, ¿no? Que en ese tiempo mi abuelo, pues creció como en el tiempo de la Revolución, como en los early nineteen hundreds.

________________________________________
ENCARTE #3 – ELG sola

Es tan interesante lo que nos cuenta Abel, de los gustos musicales de su abuelo. Me imagino que en ese entonces en Tlachichila, Zacatecas, el pueblo beneficiaba del RPM, Radio Programas de Mexico, una iniciativa de 1941 que impulsó la creación de varias emisoras regionales, y las respaldó con programación y anunciantes. En cuanto a la musica argentina que prefería el abuelo de Abel, puede haber sido Atahualpa Yupanqui u otro cantautor del gran florecimiento del canto argentino de mediados del siglo XX. Alberto Cortez, el cantautor argentino que elige Abel como para su 2da canción, fue heredero de este florecimiento.
¡Así se trenzan los hilos del gusto y tradición a través de las décadas!

ELG: Mm-hm. Mmmm. Sí, se ha cambiado mucho el gusto musical, creo. Y sobre todo fuera de la capital, ¿no? muchas subidas y bajadas del entusiasmo por la misma música regional. Tiene que ver con todo este rollo del nacionalismo, y del orgullo, cómo se lía con el nacionalismo. O como acabas de decir, eso del orgullo de pueblo, que es otra cosa por completo. Y...muy interesante, muy interesante. Sí, y... Una y otra vez me encuentro en estas entrevistas a con las memorias de los abuelos, las abuelas de mis entrevistadxs. Y muchos de ellos vivían la Revolución misma. Y la influencia de aquella época en las vidas actuales es impresionante.

Abel: Mm-hm.

ELG: Tiene muchos, muchos caminos de influencia en la vida actual. Y la vida musical, claro. Así que... Pues ¡qué chido! Creo que ya es tiempo pasar a la segunda canción, que habla un poco de, bueno, de tus esperanzas, o como dijiste tú, tus aspiraciones para el futuro. Y esto es la canción, "Castillos en el aire," por Alberto Cortez. Y tengo que agradecerte por haberme introducido a esta canción, porque es una... ¡es una cosa!

CLIP DE MÚSICA #2a
Alberto Cortez, “Castillos en el aire” (1a parte de la canción)

ELG: Ahh, qué canción más chida. Bueno–

Abel: ¡Alegre!

ELG: ¡Alegre! Auténtica alegría, verdad? Pero es curioso, creo, porque realmente habla de asuntos bastante serios, pero de manera más ligera…Bueno. ¿Cómo representa tus esperanzas, Abel?

Abel: No, así como lo mencionas tú, es decir la segunda pregunta, que es lo que representa mis esperanzas? Ahh, de hecho yo crecí con el rock urbano, digamos.

ELG: Sí.

Abel: No hay mucha esperanza, ¿no? Es bastante, pues, seria la temática, y muchas veces nomás hablando las realidades que se viven. Pero en este particular creo que también habla sobre las realidades que vivimos, ¿no? Como gente, pues creo que me conecta mucho, como con una esencia de niño, ¿no? Crecemos todos con la... o sea, lo imposible no existe.


ELG: Sí, es que la segunda parte, de "dut du du du..." [canturrea].

Abel: Anjá.
___________________________________
ENCARTE #4 – DC + ELG

NOTA: no es una traducción, sino trata de temas parecidos. Los diálogos de encartes se hablan de manera improvisada.

DC: OK. So.. "Castillos en el aire," ¿eh?

ELG: Sí. En el aire.

DC: Bueno, me encanta que Abel eligiera esta canción también, porque creo que en ella puedo ver mucho de Abel. Pero antes de hablar de eso, ¿por qué no hablamos un poco de la música? Alberto Cortez fue un cantante argentino muy famoso que consiguió su primer trabajo importante cantando para la "Orquesta San Francisco Jazz." Que yo... Para mí, cuando yo oí eso. Yo pensaba "Oh wow, de mi San Francisco!" Yo soy de la área de la Bahía San Francisco, nacido en Oakland, California. Yo pensé "Wow, que increíble!" Pero -- ¡no!

ELG:  [se ríe]

DC: Gasté como una hora tratando de encontrar algo. Pero no era así. El cantó para la "Orquesta San Francisco Jazz de Buenos Aires." Of course.

ELG: Claro, claro.

DC: Por supuesto. Pero -- fue así. Estudió Ciencias Sociales en Buenos Aires, pero luego se dedicó totalmente a la música y se convirtió en uno de los cantantes más famosos de toda América Latina. Y lo hizo cantando Jazz y cantando música de Sudamérica. Y yo creo que en esta canción podemos oír eso. Puedo oír todo eso en esta canción. Y me encanta, totalmente.

ELG: Sí, sí. Bueno, es curioso porque yo, con mi formación de músico de la música clásica, escucho en la canción la influencia de -- bueno, sobre todo de la ópera.

DC: Ah, guau.

ELG: Cómo empieza la canción, ¿no? Súper dramática. Un poco como... No sé como se dice, "over the top."

DC: [se ríe]

ELG: Pero, como dramática, ¡trágica! Y luego, más tarde, la misma canción pasa a otro tipo de música mucho más ligero. Y bueno, es el propósito de la misma canción, ¿no? Es este contraste entre estilos y entre estilos de vivir. Y por eso lo eligió Abel, creo. Pero bueno. Háblanos un poco de…. bueno -- Cortés es argentino. Vivía muchos años en España, pero no suena la música, su música -- no suena como "latina."

DC: No. Y yo creo que, para mí, esta canción es un ejemplo de la música latina como es. Y de eso quiero decir que la música latina siempre ha sido dinámica culturalmente. Y aquí en los Estados Unidos hay una imagen, ¿no? una idea, que la música latina es solamente mariachi o salsa o algo así.

ELG: Si.

DC: ¿No? Pero en realidad la música latina, la música de Sudamérica, de México, del Caribe. Muy, muy, muy dinámica. Y tiene muchas cosas de todas las culturas del mundo. Y eso me encanta en esta canción, que es un ejemplo de eso. De la música latina como es.

ELG: Sí, sí, sí. Y también, que habla tan simplemente de cosas fundamentales de la vida. Esta frase, que Cortés era "el gran cantautor de las cosas simples." Esto encierra perfectamente su carácter como artista. Yo creo.

DC: Mm-hm.


CLIP DE MÚSICA #2b
“Castillos en el aire,” 2da parte

ELG: -- es que casi suena como canción de niñxs, no? Es muy notable. Yo estaba aquí como meneando la cabeza, bailando un poco, porque así suena. Pero bueno, la canción habla, la letra habla de un conflicto muy real, entre…lo llama "la cordura," y el amor. Y...¿hay un conflicto así en tu vida? ¿Tú te encuentras ante momentos de querer volar y no poder volar? Cómo es que te relacionas con la canción?

Abel: La canción, como tú dices, habla sobre este conflicto... Es como en cierta forma yo lo veo como la adaptación, digamos, lo que le dicen "adulting." Hay tantas ideas, ¿no? sobre qué es ser adulto. Y muchas veces, eso se representa como dejar de idealizar un futuro, ¿no¿ Bueno, yo me incluyo entre la...pues entre la gente que está haciendo como proyectos que apoyan, digamos, un futuro diferente, ¿no? en sentido comunitario.

ELG:  Sí.

Abel: Y para muchos es como eso no es más realista, ¿no? Esto es como algo que hace uno cuando está joven, en su "época de rebeldía," digamos, en cierta forma. En algunos de mis tíos así lo lo pintan. Y llega un momento donde ya te tienes que hacer serio, y tienes que averiguar tu vida y agarrarte un empleo. Que no sea riesgoso, digamos. Y pues, creo que la forma en que yo lo asimilo esta canción es de que estamos creando como una cooperativa, o creando unas alternativas alimentarias. Pues es de... Se me hace como por una parte, soñador. Y por otra parte, pues tomando pasos concretos también, ¿no? Y pues ya en un ambiente personal, pues creo que en ciertas formas me conecto a esa energía, ¿no? De relacionarme con gente que tenga esa esencia, que quieren estar en conexión con su esencia. Y no tanto ser llevados por lo que nos presentan los medios, ¿no?  que nos dice[n], digamos, las instituciones, cómo debemos de pensar.

ELG: Te cuento algo, es que hace unas horas estaba investigando un poco sobre la señora anarquista Emma Goldman, que era una rusa que emigró a Estados Unidos en los años tempranos del siglo XX, y se hizo anarquista. Bastante famosa. Y hay una cita que se atribuye a ella. Se oye en todas partes. Resulta que no lo dijo, pero realmente no importa; la cita es bella. Bueno, en español seria, "Si no puedo bailar, no quiero [ser] parte de tu revolución."
"If I can't dance, I don't want to be part of your revolution."

Abel: ¡Guau! Jajaja.

ELG: Y creo que expresa muy netamente algo que tiene esta canción también. Es que, la importancia de volar, la importancia de extender las alas -- hablando metafóricamente, claro -- es real, es profundo. Es que hay que bailar, hay que ponerse un poco frívolo, ¿no? Pero la paradoja es que, es muy importante. Es muy serio, en efecto, tener alegría y ser frívolo de vez en cuando.

Abel: No, completamente de acuerdo. Creo que para mí, mi baile, digamos, en una forma muy real, al día del día, es poder cultivar, no?. Entonces en la granja, no? Y poder hacer la práctica o estar cultivando es para mí --Pues no, no lo veo tanto como una empleo, como la chamba, sino es un despeje para mí, ¿no? Es una forma de centrarme otra vez. Me imagino, me gustaría pensar que cada persona tiene una forma de conectarse a ese centro de sí mismo. Y muchas veces, pues, como dice la canción,  pues, "Qué idiota.” Eso no se puede hacer porque tienes toda esta responsabilidad. O lo que sea.

ELG: Sí, que tengamos todos y todas la fe en nosotrxs mismxs, a ser idiotas de vez en cuando, ¿no? [se ríe] Pues sí, y me gusta mucho el imagen de jardín como un piso de baile, por así decirlo.

Abel: Exacto.

ELG: A veces, bueno, estando en mi propio jardín y arrancando malas hierbas, tengo una imagen de que todo el jardín es una fiesta. Y ellas, las llamadas malas hierbas, no están invitadas a la fiesta… Es otra versión, quizás...

Pero sí, yo creo que en fin, lo de sacar adelante, lo de tener esperanzas en la vida, es como un baile -- para recurrir a la metáfora -- es como un baile entre lo adulto, como dices tú, y lo frívolo, o bien la alegría, que no tiene por qué. La alegría pura de la vida, ¿no? Pero ahora creo que estamos rondando al fin de la entrevista. Y no sé si tienes algo más que quieres decir sobre la canción de Cortez, o sobre los temas que hemos sacado de las canciones.

Abel: No, creo que con esto estoy satisfecho. Nomás muy agradecido de poder tener esa conversación contigo.

ELG: Yo también.

Abel: Ha sido "my highlight."

ELG: Qué bien, qué bien... Sí, exacto. Estoy muy agradecida porque cada historia que surge a través de estas entrevistas es un tesoro.

Abel: Pues estoy de acuerdo. Y es de...No sé cuánto tiempo tengamos, si es parte del programa, pero me interesaría recibir de ti, pues, a tu canción de tu origen, y tu canción de tu esperanza.

ELG: Jajajaja. Sí, ¡claro, claro! Claro que lo he pensado bastante.

Abel: Mm-hm.

ELG: Y...[suspira] Yo diría que una canción que sirve muy bien para representar mis orígenes seria… Es música clásica, un concerto para piano de Robert Schumann, que era un compositor alemán del siglo XIX. Es una belleza, muy romántica, muy apasionada.

CLIP DE MÚSICA #3, Schumann concerto para piano

ELG. Y cuando yo tenía 14, 15 años me enamoré de este concerto. Así que para mí, la música de mis orígenes, la música que amaba y estudiaba como adolescente, a qué dedicaba mi -- bueno, era mi profesión durante veinte años -- ahora no es mi música. Y es una cosa que duele, que me duele. Así que es un poco conflictuosa, la historia, ¿no?

Abel: Bueno, se me hace interesante que desde joven te interesó ese género de música.

ELG: Pues sí, apasionadamente, la verdad. Sí, me enamoré de esta música. Y todavía la amo, la quiero. Pero no puedo, no puedo escuchar porque lleva varias capas de memorias dolorosas o conflictuosas, y por eso he tomado un poco de distancia. --Y bueno, brevemente, para el futuro... Bueno, te diré que para mí la música que más me da ánimo, más me da esperanza --eso suena raro, pero es verdad. ¡Es mi propia música! Me dedico de vez en cuando, no con frecuencia, pero de vez en cuando, compongo canciones. A veces son sones, en la tradición jaranera, ¿no? Y a veces son más bien como folk music. Pero es con un espíritu de puro juego. Es que después de tantos años de profesionalizarme, en que la música era como una comodidad más para vender, ahora me dirijo a mis propias músicas. No creo que sean particularmente buenas, [se ríen los dos] pero me dan un un aliento y un placer, una alegría muy fuerte. Así que para mí esas músicas particulares son mi esperanza. Sí.

Abel: Ay, qué chido. Chido.

ELG: Y gracias por preguntar. ¡Buena pregunta!

Abel: [se ríe] Claro, gracias por compartir. Es de... si algún dia está para compartir, me gustaría escuchar una de tus músicas.

ELG: Pues lo estoy pensando, lo estoy pensando. Me gustaría grabar mis canciones…Bueno, pues entonces Abel. Creo que es tiempo de despedirnos y, bueno, con mis agradecimientos muy fuertes por tus perspectivas sobre la vida y la música. Es un privilegio escucharlas.

Abel: Ah, no, gracias. Gracias Elisabeth. Gracias por la invitación y pues sí, está muy contento mi corazón de haber tenido esta oportunidad.

ELG: Ah, Gracias. Pues yo igual, yo igual…Mil gracias y cuídense todos. -- Y cuándo es la fecha, más o menos, del parto, ¿se sabe?

Abel: Ah, es para finales de julio. El julio 28 supuestamente, los doctores estiman.

ELG: Pues estoy muy, como toda la comunidad, estoy muy emocionada por ustedes, y les deseo todo tipo de cosas buenas y de alegría durante esta época. Es muy especial.

Abel: Sí, muchas gracias. En lo personal estoy super emocionadísimo y pues, can't wait, can't wait to meet little Tlalli!

ELG: Oh, my goodness... Pues bueno, que tengas buena tarde, buen fin de semana, y estamos en contacto.

Abel: Ándale Elisabeth, sí, muchas gracias. Que pases buen día.

ELG: Sí, sí, sí. Bueno, gracias Abel. Hasta pronto.

Abel: Anda. Hasta pronto.

ELG: Chao.

OUTRO
No tocamos ningún ejemplo de la música que representa mis esperanzas para el futuro, porque ya pronto van a escuchar un ejemplo: la canción con que cerramos cada episodio, [cántalo] “Si yo fuera una canción…” –pues es de mi propia composición…
Mientras: hemos puesto unos enlaces a CRECE, la cooperativa comunitaria jardinera con que trabaja Abel, en nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org. Esperamos que los explorarán y !que se inspiren

¿Quisieran saber más?

En nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, pueden encontrar transcripciones completas en ambas lenguas de cad entrevistaa; nuestro Blog, donde indagamos más en los asuntos históricos, culturales, y políticos que surgen en torno a cada canción; enlaces para oyentes que quisieran investigar un tema más a fondo; y unos imágenes muy chidos. Encontrarán un playlist con todas las canciones de todas las entrevistas hasta la fecha, así como otro playlist elegido por nuestro equipo.

¡Esperamos sus comentarios o preguntas! Contáctennos en nuestro sitio Web, siyofuera.org, o bien pueden participar en la conversación “Si yo fuera” a través de los medios sociales. Estamos en FeisBuk e Instagram. Y, pues, también hay el modo antiguo, de boca en boca. Si les gusta nuestro show, por favor digan a sus amigxs y familiares que lo escuchen. Y por favor, suscríbanse, a través de su plataforma de podcast preferida. Les traeremos una nueva entrevista cada dos semanas, los viernes por la mañana.

Julia Alanis, Cynthia Marcel De La Torre, y Wesley McClintock son nuestros soniderxs; Zoë Broussard y Laura Díaz manejan la mercadotecnia; David Castañeda es Investigador de Música; Jen Orenstein traduce las entrevistas entre español e inglés; y Deyaneira García y Alex Dolven facilitan la producción. Somos una entidad sin fines de lucro, actualmente y agradecidamente apoyada por una beca desde la Fundación John Simon Guggenheim, así como fondos desde el Programa de Becas de Facultad de la Universidad de California, Los Angeles, y de la Escuela de Música Herb Alpert en la misma Universidad.

Por ahora, y hasta la próxima entrevista--¡que sigan escuchando unxs a otrxs! Soy Elisabeth Le Guin, y están escuchando, “Si yo fuera una canción.”

English

CRECE COOPERATIVE – Community resilience through urban gardening

https://communityresilience.uci.edu/crece-community-resistance/ (Student blog, en inglés)

FB: https://www.facebook.com/crececommunityinresistance.co.op/

IG: @crece.coop 

____________________________________________________________________________

MEDICALIZATION OF CHILDBIRTH // LA MEDICALIZACIÓN DEL PARTO


MIDWIVES ALLIANCE OF NORTH AMERICA

https://mana.org/what-we-do/organizations-coalitions (en inglés)

  • links to local and specialized organizations in USA, Canada, and Mexico
  • enlaces a organizaciones locales y especializadas en EE UU, Canadá, y México


In English:

California Health Care Foundation 

Infographic site, very informative: 

https://www.chcf.org/publication/infographic-overmedicalization-childbirth/ 

They also did a 2016 survey called “Listening to Mothers in California” with issue briefs on the childbirth experiences of various demographic groups:

https://www.chcf.org/collection/listening-to-mothers-in-california/


Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English. Witches, Midwives & Nurses : A History of Women Healers. The Feminist Press, 2010


en español: 

https://hollywoodhealthandsociety.org/sites/default/files/attachments/page/Overmedicalization%20of%20Childbirth_Spanish.pdf


Barbara Ehrenreich y Deirdre English, traducido por ??. Brujas, parteras y enfermeras. Bauma, 2019.

Existe una versión en pdf de solamente 41 pp. https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxwZXJtYW11amVyZXN8Z3g6NWVmNTI4YTU5ZTZiMjkzOQ 


JUVENTINO ROSAS (todo en español)

Wikipedia https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juventino_Rosas 


Sólo existe una biografía monógrafo de Rosas, y algo irónicamente, está escrita en inglés y por un austriaco; no se la recomendamos. Es un tema que se beneficiaría de un estudio pensativo.


There is only one monograph biography of Rosas, which rather ironically is written in English by an Austrian; we don’t recommend it. This is an area that could use some thoughtful scholarship.

ALBERTO CORTEZ  

(todo en español)

Noticia de su muerte en El País, con biografía: https://elpais.com/cultura/2019/04/04/actualidad/1554397254_613657.html 

http://www.albertocortez.com/ Un sitio conmemorativo bien bonito


Wikipedia en español ofrece una discografía (¡más de 40 álbumes!) https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Cortez 


LA RADIO EN MEXICO 

(todo en español)

Leyva, Juan. Política educativa y comunicación social: la radio en México, 1940-1946. México : Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 1992.


Romo, Cristina. Ondas, canales y mensajes: un perfil de la radio en México. Guadalajara, Jalisco, México: ITESO, 1991.

Español

CRECE COOPERATIVE – Community resilience through urban gardening

https://communityresilience.uci.edu/crece-community-resistance/ (Student blog, en inglés)

FB: https://www.facebook.com/crececommunityinresistance.co.op/

IG: @crece.coop 

MEDICALIZATION OF CHILDBIRTH // LA MEDICALIZACIÓN DEL PARTO


MIDWIVES ALLIANCE OF NORTH AMERICA

https://mana.org/what-we-do/organizations-coalitions (en inglés)

  • links to local and specialized organizations in USA, Canada, and Mexico
  • enlaces a organizaciones locales y especializadas en EE UU, Canadá, y México


In English:

California Health Care Foundation 

Infographic site, very informative: 

https://www.chcf.org/publication/infographic-overmedicalization-childbirth/ 

They also did a 2016 survey called “Listening to Mothers in California” with issue briefs on the childbirth experiences of various demographic groups:

https://www.chcf.org/collection/listening-to-mothers-in-california/


Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English. Witches, Midwives & Nurses : A History of Women Healers. The Feminist Press, 2010


en español: 

https://hollywoodhealthandsociety.org/sites/default/files/attachments/page/Overmedicalization%20of%20Childbirth_Spanish.pdf


Barbara Ehrenreich y Deirdre English, traducido por ??. Brujas, parteras y enfermeras. Bauma, 2019.

Existe una versión en pdf de solamente 41 pp. https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxwZXJtYW11amVyZXN8Z3g6NWVmNTI4YTU5ZTZiMjkzOQ 


JUVENTINO ROSAS (todo en español)

Wikipedia https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juventino_Rosas 


Sólo existe una biografía monógrafo de Rosas, y algo irónicamente, está escrita en inglés y por un austriaco; no se la recomendamos. Es un tema que se beneficiaría de un estudio pensativo.


There is only one monograph biography of Rosas, which rather ironically is written in English by an Austrian; we don’t recommend it. This is an area that could use some thoughtful scholarship.

ALBERTO CORTEZ  

(todo en español)

Noticia de su muerte en El País, con biografía: https://elpais.com/cultura/2019/04/04/actualidad/1554397254_613657.html 

http://www.albertocortez.com/ Un sitio conmemorativo bien bonito


Wikipedia en español ofrece una discografía (¡más de 40 álbumes!) https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberto_Cortez 


LA RADIO EN MEXICO 

(todo en español)

Leyva, Juan. Política educativa y comunicación social: la radio en México, 1940-1946. México : Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 1992.


Romo, Cristina. Ondas, canales y mensajes: un perfil de la radio en México. Guadalajara, Jalisco, México: ITESO, 1991.

SOBRE LAS OLAS - PEDRO INFANTE

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

En la inmensidad
De las olas flotando te vi
Y al irte a salvar
Por tu vida la vida perdí

Tu dulce visión
En mi alma indeleble grabo
La tierna pasión
Que la dicha y la paz me robo

Si dentro de mi dolor
Tu refugio llegara a turbar
Te seguiré con amor
Note niegues mujer a escuchar

El viento te llevara
Los gemidos de mi corazon
Y siempre repetirá
Los acentos de mi canción

La tempestad en su furia del mar
Y del relámpago en duro fragor
Solo podrán débilmente escuchar
La tempestad que hay aquí con tu amor

Por doquiera que voy
Tu recuerdo es mi guía
En la noche es mi fe
Pues mi sol en el día

Mi suspiro es mi ideal
O mi acerbo dolor
Mi doliente quebranto
Es por ti por tu amor

Con mi gemido
Te envió el corazon
Y en mis ojos
Te mando mi ser

Mas no
No quiero de ti compasión
Yo quiero amor
O por el perecer

En la inmensidad
De las olas flotando te vi
Y al irte a salvar
Por tu vida la vida perdí

Tu dulce visión
En mi alma indeleble grabo
La tierna pasión
Que la dicha y la paz me robó

Traducción | Translation

In the vastness

Of the waves I saw you floating

And in going to save you

For your life I lost my own

The sweet vision of you

Was indelibly etched onto my soul

The tender passion

Peace and fortune stole

If in my pain

Your refuge is disturbed

I will follow you with love

Woman, don’t refuse to listen

The wind will bring you

My heart’s wailing

And the strains of my song

will always repeat

The storm in the sea’s fury

And from lightning’s mighty crash

Only weakly can be heard

The storm here with your love

Wheresoever I go

Your memory is my guide

It’s my faith in the night

My sun in the day

My breath, my ideal

Or my heap of pain

My painful sorrow

It’s because of you, because of your love

With my wail

I send you my heart

And in my eyes

I send you my being

But no

I don’t want your compassion

I want love

Or to perish for it

In the vastness

Of the waves I saw you floating

And in going to save you

For your life I lost my own

The sweet vision of you

Was indelibly etched on my soul

The tender passion

Peace and fortune stole

CASTILLOS EN EL AIRE - ALBERTO CORTEZ

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language

Quiso volar igual que las gaviotas
Libre en el aire, por el aire libre
Y los demás dijeron, ""¡pobre idiota
No sabe que volar es imposible!""

Mas él alzó sus sueños hacia el cielo
Y poco a poco, fue ganando altura
Y los demás, quedaron en el suelo
Guardando la cordura

Y construyó, castillos en aire
A pleno sol, con nubes de algodón
En un lugar, adonde nunca nadie
Pudo llegar usando la razón

Y construyó ventanas fabulosas
Llenas de luz, de magia y de color
Y convocó al duende de las cosas
Que tiene mucho que ver con el amor

En los demás, al verlo tan dichoso
Cundió la alarma, se dictaron normas
""No vaya a ser que fuera contagioso...""
Tratar de ser feliz de aquella forma

La conclusión, es clara y contundente
Lo condenaron por su chifladura
A convivir de nuevo con la gente
Vestido de corduraQuiso volar igual que las gaviotas
Libre en el aire, por el aire libre
Y los demás dijeron, pobre idiota
No sabe que volar es imposible

Mas él alzó sus sueños hacia el cielo
Y poco a poco, fue ganando altura
Y los demás, quedaron en el suelo
Guardando la cordura

Y construyó, castillos en el aire
A pleno sol, con nubes de algodón
En un lugar, adonde nunca nadie
Pudo llegar usando la razón

Y construyó ventanas fabulosas
Llenas de luz, de magia y de color
Y convocó al duende de las cosas
Que tiene mucho que ver con el amor

En los demás, al verlo tan dichoso
Cundió la alarma, se dictaron normas
No vaya a ser que fuera contagioso
Tratar de ser feliz de aquella forma

La conclusión, es clara y contundente
Lo condenaron por su chifladura
A convivir de nuevo con la gente
Vestido de cordura

Por construir castillos en el aire
A pleno sol, con nubes de algodón
En un lugar, adonde nunca nadie
Pudo llegar usando la razón

Y por abrir ventanas fabulosas
Llenas de luz, de magia y de color
Y convocar al duende de las cosas
Que tienen mucho que ver con el amor

Acaba aquí la historia del idiota
Que por el aire, como el aire libre
Quiso volar igual que las gaviotas
Pero eso es imposible ¿o no?


Por construir castillos en el aire
A pleno sol, con nubes de algodón
En un lugar, adonde nunca nadie
Pudo llegar usando la razón

Y por abrir ventanas fabulosas
Llenas de luz, de magia y de color
Y convocar al duende de las cosas
Que tienen mucho que ver con el amor

Acaba aquí la historia del idiota
Que por el aire, como el aire libre
Quiso volar igual que las gaviotas...,
Pero eso es imposible..., ¿o no?...

Traducción | Translation

He wanted to fly like the seagulls

Free in the air, through the open air

And the others said, poor idiot

He doesn’t know it’s impossible to fly

But he raised his dreams toward the sky

And little by little, he gained altitude

And the others stayed on the ground

Staying reasonable

And he built castles in the air

In full sun, with cotton clouds

In a place where no one could ever

Arrive using reason

And he built fabulous windows

Full of light, of magic, and of color

And he summoned the goblin of things

That have a lot to do with love

Among the rest, at seeing him so blissful

Alarm spread, rules were dictated

So it wouldn’t become contagious

To seek happiness that way

The conclusion is clear and severe

They condemned him for his mania

To live amongst the people again

Dressed in a reasonable way

For building castles in the air

In full sun, with cotton clouds

In a place where no one could ever

Arrive using reason

And for opening fabulous windows

Full of light, of magic and of color

And for summoning the goblin of things

That have a lot to do with love

Here ends the story of the idiot

Who through the air, like open air

Wanted to fly like the seagulls

But it’s impossible, isn’t it?

SCHUMANN PIANO CONCERTO

Lyrics | Letras
Idioma Original | Original Language
Traducción | Translation